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I have a class called .box-159 where the number changes every time the screen is refreshed. Is there a way to define this field (say background-color) in the CSS?

marked as duplicate by BoltClock css Mar 3 '16 at 14:09

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  • Does CSS allow wildcards? I don't think so. You could refer to the element by something other than the class – jpaugh Feb 25 '16 at 22:03
  • are you asking to style the element differently based on the number at the end of the class? – Cruiser Feb 25 '16 at 22:09

Yes it is possible just by using CSS only.

Option #1 - Match by prefix value

  • Use CSS Class selector ^="class" which select all elements whose class is prefixed by "box-"

[class^="box-"] {
  background: red;
  height: 100px;
  width: 100px;
  margin: 10px 0;
  display:block
}
<div class="box-159"></div>
<span class="box-147"></span>
<article class="box-76878"></article>

Option #2 - Match by contains at least one value

  • Use another CSS class selector *="class" (equivalent to CSS attribute selector) which select all elements whose class contains at least one substring "box-".

[class*="box-"] {
  background: red;
  height: 100px;
  width: 100px;
  margin: 10px 0;
  display:block
}
<div class="box-159"></div>
<span class="box-147"></span>
<article class="box-76878"></article>

You can add an additional class, like so, then both those elements will have the class' CSS attributes:

.box-class {
    background-color: red;
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    margin-bottom: 20px;
}
<div class="box-class box-4"></div>
<div class="box-class box-159"></div>

  • 1
    Another class is not necessary, this can be done with a CSS selector alone. – Adam Konieska Feb 25 '16 at 22:05
  • 1
    I just noticed, well it is a non-efficiant, working solution at least :) – Clemens Himmer Feb 25 '16 at 22:06
  • 1
    I prefer this solution. Attribute selectors, especially using partial string matching, will always be slower than a simple class selector like this. – Heretic Monkey Feb 25 '16 at 22:14

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