2

This is how the code looks like:

public class Family
{
    public int FamilyID { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Member> FamilyMembers { get; set; }
}
public class Member
{
    public int MemberID { get; set; }
    public virtual Family Family { get; set; }
}
public class Bicycle
{
    public int BicycleID { get; set; }
    public virtual Member Owner { get; set; }
}
public class MyContext : DbContext
{
    public MyContext : base () { }
}

So, there is a one-to-one relantionship between Member and Bicycle, and there is one-to-many relationship between Family and Member. My question is: how do I initialize these foreign keys using my context? All the tutorials on the internet say how to define, but now how to initialize them. Do I simply assign them a correct int value or do I assign them a whole object, and if so, how do I do that? Using LINQ?

@Edit: Assume there are 2 families: Smith and Johnson. Smith has 3 members: Ben, Amy, Brian. Johnson has 2 members: John and Natalie. How do I initialize all that in my code?

2
  • You configurations should have your Primary Keys setup as DatabaseGeneratedOption.Identity. Then when you save the objects, the IDs will be set automatically, and then the FK IDs when those objects are set as well.
    – krillgar
    Feb 26, 2016 at 13:54
  • But how do I initialize those FKs? Assume there are 2 families: Smith and Johnson. Smith has 3 members: Ben, Amy, Brian. Johnson has 2 members: John and Natalie. How do I initialize all that in my code?
    – Amai
    Feb 26, 2016 at 14:08

2 Answers 2

3

First, fix this:

public class Member
{
    public int MemberID { get; set; }
    public virtual Family Family { get; set; }
}

That should be enough to configure the relationships. EF will make the keys identity by convention.

You can assign the relationships multiple ways. You can explicitly set FK Ids if you add them to your models, or you can use the navigation properties like this:

var family = new Family { LastName = "Smith", ...};
List<Member> members = new List<Member>
{
    new Member(){ Name = "Ben", ... },
    new Member(){ Name = "Amy", ... },
    new Member(){ Name = "Brian", ... }
};
family.FamilyMembers = members;
context.Family.Add(family);
context.SaveChanges();

To assign a bike to an owner:

var owner = context.Members.Find(ownerId);
var bike = new Bicycle
{
    Make = "ACME",
    Model = "XXXX",
    Owner = owner
};
context.Bicycles.Add(bike);
context.SaveChanges();

EDIT: Yes, it is certainly permissible to add FK to your model. That's the method I use. Like this code:

public class Member
{
    public int MemberID { get; set; }
    public int FamilyID { get; set; }  // EF will automatically make this a FK by convention
    public virtual Family Family { get; set; }
}

You need to add annotations if you don't adhere to convention or if you want them for documentation sake:

public class Member
{
    public int MemberID { get; set; }
    public int FamilyID { get; set; }
    [ForeignKey("FamilyID")]
    public virtual Family Family { get; set; }
}

See http://www.entityframeworktutorial.net/code-first/foreignkey-dataannotations-attribute-in-code-first.aspx

I prefer the fluent api. It keeps my models cleaner and separates concerns. For simple projects you can add all the fluent code in the OnModelCreating() override in your context, but I prefer to store my entity configurations in a folder under my context (one file per entity) as described here: http://odetocode.com/blogs/scott/archive/2011/11/28/composing-entity-framework-fluent-configurations.aspx

You can actually have EF automatically find your fluent code using the technique described here: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/dn519921.aspx

Regarding the child collections, yes, you can new it up in the constructor:

public class Family
{
    public Family()
    {
        FamilyMembers = new HashSet<Member>();
    }

    public int FamilyID { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Member> FamilyMembers { get; set; }
}
3
  • Thanks, this answered my question just the way I wanted. Got a few new questions though, if you'd be willing to answer: First, that FamilyFK - I know it's not needed, but it allows me to set a custom name for the FK. Is it still bad to do that? Should I use DataAnnotations or Fluent API instead? And since you add the members by using a list, doest that mean that: - I can define FamilyMembers as a List in constructors ( new List<Member>() )? - I have to have a method for adding FKs to the list, as well as a method for removing them?
    – Amai
    Feb 27, 2016 at 10:37
  • See my edited answer. You can add the family members via a list or one at a time. family.FamilyMembers.Add(mySingleFamilyMember); Feb 27, 2016 at 16:39
  • Sorry to bother you this way, but I'm completly stuck with another problem I asked yesterday and which noone seems to be capable of helping me with, I fail even to find any materials or references concerning that and so I thought maybe you could take a look and see if you know how to solve that problem. Once again, sorry if that bothers you. stackoverflow.com/questions/35746496/…
    – Amai
    Mar 3, 2016 at 13:33
0

You don't need to explicitly define a foreign key between Family and Member. Entity Framework will take care of this for you if you require. Because you have already stated this property

public virtual ICollection<Member> FamilyMembers { get; set; }

On the Family class the Foreign key is created during the initial Add-Migration or Update-database. So you don't need the property

public virtual FamilyFK { get; set; }

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