91

In C++, is the ?: operator faster than if()...else statements? Are there any differences between them in compiled code?

5
  • Difficult question, as it would also depend on the optimalisation setting of the compiler.
    – extraneon
    Aug 25, 2010 at 11:35
  • 3
    That certainly depends on what you do inside the branches. The conditional operator allows only expressions while if allows statements.
    – Gumbo
    Aug 25, 2010 at 11:37
  • 4
    related: To ternary or not to ternary? Aug 25, 2010 at 11:57
  • 11
    Some guy randomly decided to edit my perfectly okay three years old question, rewriting the question so it sounds totally unlike me and adding some totally unnecessary code that makes the whole problem pointless because, thanks to constant folding, both those samples reduce to simple "result = 5". Reverting.
    – Xirdus
    Jul 10, 2013 at 13:08
  • Assembly version cmov vs jmp stackoverflow.com/questions/14131096/… May 19, 2016 at 10:21

14 Answers 14

108

It is not faster. There is one difference when you can initialize a constant variable depending on some expression:

const int x = (a<b) ? b : a;

You can't do the same with if-else.

13
  • 22
    @Developer Art: Which isn't possible with a const variable.
    – mtvec
    Aug 25, 2010 at 11:43
  • 1
    You could create a non-const variable, assign to it in the if/else, then create a new const variable and construct it with the non-const. Rather wasteful, but far from impossible.
    – Puppy
    Aug 25, 2010 at 12:56
  • 7
    What about good ol' max? const int x = max(a,b); works just fine.
    – bobobobo
    Dec 20, 2012 at 23:06
  • 3
    @bobobobo ha! when i read your comment i thought the command you wre suggesting was max ? const int x = max(a,b); and thought whoa! WTF is that! then i read it again and noticed the question mark wasn't monospace! given the topic, i think i was justified in thinking the ? was part of the command! :)
    – dewd
    Dec 5, 2014 at 12:50
  • 2
    You can use const int x = [&] -> int { if (a < b) return b; else return a; }.
    – L. F.
    Jul 24, 2019 at 11:02
94

Depends on your compiler, but on any modern compiler there is generally no difference. It's something you shouldn't worry about. Concentrate on the maintainability of your code.

8
  • 1
    +1 For many applications, the perf difference is not worth considering even on a really dump compiler.
    – user395760
    Aug 25, 2010 at 11:48
  • 4
    Regarding maintainability of code I'd prefer if...else. At least for me it is easier to read.
    – Exa
    Aug 25, 2010 at 12:08
  • 2
    @Exa: Depends on the context. The ternary operator is often better when you are initializing an object. Aug 25, 2010 at 12:24
  • @Nemanja: That's why I said "At least for me". I was just referring to the readability of code :)
    – Exa
    Aug 25, 2010 at 12:45
  • 1
    @kotlinski, I'm not saying a conditional is less maintainable than an if. They are both clearer in certain, differing, circumstances, as described in the answers of the To ternary or not to ternary question linked above.
    – ptomato
    Aug 25, 2010 at 13:41
45

I've seen GCC turn the conditional operator into cmov (conditional move) instructions, while turning if statements into branches, which meant in our case, the code was faster when using the conditional operator. But that was a couple of years ago, and most likely today, both would compile to the same code.

There's no guarantee that they'll compile to the same code. If you need the performance then, as always, measure. And when you've measured and found out that 1. your code is too slow, and 2. it is this particular chunk of code that is the culprit, then study the assembly code generated by the compiler and check for yourself what is happening.

Don't trust golden rules like "the compiler will always generate more efficient code if I use the conditional operator".

5
  • 3
    +1. When I was developing for PS3 using GCC, using conditionals instead of "if" was useful to avoid branches. Aug 25, 2010 at 13:21
  • Is this specific to c language? The standard of c++ says Only one of the second and third expressions is evaluated. Every value computation and side effect associated with the first expression is sequenced before every value computation and side effect associated with the second or third expression. Which apparently prevent the compiler from generating a cmove instructions.
    – Joey.Z
    Aug 3, 2015 at 3:46
  • 2
    @zoujyjs no, C has the same rule. But under the as-if rule, the compiler is free to cheat, as long as the end result is correct. So as long as there are no side effects, the compiler can make this optimization.
    – jalf
    Aug 3, 2015 at 11:18
  • How to implement if else with cmov? A mov to value 1 + a cmov to value 2 ? May 19, 2016 at 10:36
  • 1
    NOTE : This advice is outdated (cira 2010), I could not reproduce this on gcc 4.4 or later.
    – ACyclic
    Oct 12, 2016 at 18:35
17

They are the same, however, the ternary operator can be used in places where it is difficult to use a if/else:

printf("Total: %d item%s", cnt, cnt != 1 ? "s" : "");

Doing that statement with an if/else, would generate a very different compiled code.


Update after 8 years...

Actually, I think this would be better:

printf(cnt == 1 ? "Total: %d item" : "Total: %d items", cnt);

(actually, I'm pretty sure you can replace the "%d" in the first string with "one")

5
  • 8
    Doesn't even need a ternary operator: printf("Total: %d item%s", cnt, "s" + (cnt==1));
    – MSalters
    Aug 26, 2010 at 9:15
  • @MSalters but that gives a double null at the end of the string, which may be a problem in other situations where double null means something (eg in lpStrFilter member of OPENFILENAME structures)
    – bobobobo
    Feb 19, 2012 at 17:30
  • 1
    @bobobobo: No. %s prints up to, but not including the \0 from the source string.
    – MSalters
    Feb 20, 2012 at 8:33
  • @MSalters how does this printf("Total: %d item%s", cnt, "s" + (cnt==1)); work?
    – Quirk
    Aug 11, 2015 at 2:55
  • 2
    @Quirk: (cnt==1) is true or false, which converts to 0 or 1. "s" is a pointer to a nul-terminated string. Adding one skips one character (the s). So this prints either "s" or "".
    – MSalters
    Aug 11, 2015 at 7:14
4

Regardless the compiled code, They are semantically different thing. <cond>?<true expr>:<false expr> is an expression and if..else.. is a statement.

Although the syntax of conditional expression seems awkward, it is a good thing. You are forced to provide a <false expr> and the two expressions are type checked.

The equivalent to if..else.. in expression-based, functional language like Lisp, Haskell is ? : in C++, instead of if..else.. statement.

3

Just to be a bit left handed...

x ? y : x = value

will assign value to y if x is not 0 (false).

2
1

You are not forced to put it all on one line:-

x = y==1 ?
    2
    :// else
    3;

It is much clearer than if/else because you can see immediately that both branches lead to x being assigned to.

You can also declare a const eg

int const x = y==1 ?
            2
            :// else
            3;

And a const can be useful to the compiler to make the code more optimised.

0
0

I would expect that on most compilers and target platforms, there will be cases where "if" is faster and cases where ?: is faster. There will also be cases where one form is more or less compact than the other. Which cases favor one form or the other will vary between compilers and platforms. If you're writing performance-critical code on an embedded micro, look at what the compiler is generating in each case and see which is better. On a "mainstream" PC, because of caching issues, the only way to see which is better is to benchmark both forms in something resembling the real application.

0

In C A ternary operator " ? : " is available to construct conditional expressions of the form

exp1 ? exp2:exp3

where exp1,exp2 and exp3 are expressions

for Example

        a=20;
        b=25;
        x=(a>b)?a:b;

        in the above example x value will be assigned to b;

This can be written using if..else statement as follows

            if (a>b)
             x=a;
             else
             x=b;

**Hence there is no difference between these two. This for the programmer to write easily, but for compiler both are same.*

0

During reversing some code (which I don't remember, few years ago) I saw single line difference between the Machine Code of :? and if-else. Don't remember much but it is clear that implementation of both is different.

But I advise You to not choose one of them b'coz of its efficiency, choose according to readability of code or your convenience. Happy Coding

1
  • The difference was one of them was using goto for branching and other was using saome native instruction, I don't remember which one was using which.. Jan 19, 2012 at 12:44
0

Ternary Operator always returns a value. So in situation when you want some output value from result and there are only 2 conditions always better to use ternary operator. Use if-else if any of the above mentioned conditions are not true.

1
  • 6
    What exactly is this? Do you know what you are talking about?
    – quantum
    Oct 27, 2012 at 13:25
0

I think that there are situations where the inline if can yield "faster" code because of the scope it works at. Object creation and destruction can be costly so consider the follow scenario :

class A{
    public:
    A() : value(0) {
        cout << "Default ctor" << endl;
    }
    A(int myInt) : value(myInt)
    {
        cout << "Overloaded ctor" << endl;
    }

    A& operator=(const A& other){
        cout << "= operator" << endl;
        value = other.value; 
    }

    ~A(){
        cout << "destroyed" << std::endl;
    }

    int value;

};


int main()
{
   {
       A a;
       if(true){
           a = A(5);
       }else{
           a = A(10);
       }
   }

   cout << "Next test" << endl;
   {
        A b = true? A(5) : A(10);
   }
   return 0;
}

With this code, the output will be :

Default ctor                                                                                                                                                                                                                      
Overloaded ctor                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
= operator                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
destroyed                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
destroyed                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
Next test                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
Overloaded ctor                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
destroyed  

So by inlining the if, we save a bunch of operation needed to keep a alive at the same scope as b. While it is highly probable that the condition evaluation speed is pretty equal in both scenarios, changing scope forces you to take other factors into consideration that the inline if allows you to avoid.

1
  • And what about A a(true ? 5 : 10);
    – Quest
    Sep 4, 2016 at 11:37
-1

Now I can't help you with that, I may be able to help with a secondary question beneath it, do I want to use it? If you just want to know of the speed, just ignore my comment.

All I can say is please be very smart about when to use the ternary ? : operator. It can be a blessing as much as a curse for readability.

Ask yourself if you find this easier to read before using it

int x = x == 1 ? x = 1 : x = 1;

if (x == 1)
{
   x = 1
}
else
{
   x = 2
}

if (x == 1)
    x = 1
else
    x = 1

Yes It looks stupid to make the code 100% bogus. But that little trick helped me analyse my readability of code. It's the readability of the operator you look at in this sample, and not the content.

It LOOKS clean, but so does the average toilet seat and doorknob

In my experience, which is limited, I have seen very little people actually being able to quickly extradite information required from a ternary operator, avoid unless 100% sure it's better. It's a pain to fix when it's bugged aswell I think

4
  • 5
    first line should probably read int x = x == 1 ? 1 : 2 or possibly int x = (x == 1) ? 1 : 2
    – Hasturkun
    Aug 25, 2010 at 12:35
  • My point was merely to show the view of the code, the cleanlyness of one line is nice yes. But if you want to see CONDITION / ASSIGNEMENT the content of the code can be bogus. If you want to spot what is what you look at the operator and the location alone. I see the word IF and ( ) I know , ah , that is a condition. I see A = B ? CONDITION : CONDITION did you immedeatly spot that for yourself? Most people I know that program do not, maybe it's because most people I know that program are rookies like me. You are correct ofc in the numbers being nonsense, thats the point.
    – Proclyon
    Aug 25, 2010 at 12:59
  • 2
    First line definitely needs some parentheses. Perhaps "int x = (y==1) ? 0 : 1;" or "int x = ((y==1) ? 0 : 1);"
    – supercat
    Aug 25, 2010 at 15:09
  • 6
    I'm sorry, but I have no problem seeing the assignment. If you choose to overcomplicate the example to make your point, that's your problem. Why don't you write x = x = 1; everywhere and then complain that assignment is too complicated and should be avoided.
    – UncleBens
    Aug 25, 2010 at 16:32
-4

No, they are converted to exactly the same executable code.

2
  • 7
    -1: On what version of what compiler, on what platform, with what code?
    – Puppy
    Aug 25, 2010 at 12:05
  • 3
    DeadMG: VB6 compiler, obviously!
    – Alex F
    Aug 25, 2010 at 12:08

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