5

I'm trying to convert a C++ literal string into an instance of the following template:

template <char ... C>
struct string_literal {
    typedef string_constant type;
    static constexpr const char value[sizeof...(C)] = {C...};
    constexpr operator const char* (void) const {
        return value;
    }
};
template <char ... C>
constexpr const char string_literal<C...>::value[sizeof...(C)];

I came up with these helpers based on various sources for 'unpacking' the quoted string value into the template above.

template <unsigned N, const char (&S) [N], typename U>
struct selector;

template <unsigned N, const char (&S) [N], unsigned ...I>
struct selector<N, S, index_sequence<I...>> {
    using type = string_literal<S[I]...>;
};

template <unsigned N, const char (&S) [N]>
struct unpack {
    using type = typename selector<N, S, make_index_sequence<N>>::type;
};

However, when a call this I get a compiler error:

template <unsigned N>
constexpr auto make_string_literal(const char (&s) [N]) {
    return unpack<N, s>{}; // Error here
}

constexpr auto literal = make_string_literal("test");
// string_literal<'t','e','s','t','\0'>

GCC 4.9+ reports: error: 'const char (& s)[1]' is not a valid template argument for type 'const char (&)[1]' because a reference variable does not have a constant address

Clang 3.7.1 reports: error: non-type template argument refers to object 's' that does not have linkage

I tried a few different approaches but the errors are mostly the same. What am I missing here?

  • 1
    You can use GNU extension (example). It is the only way thinkable currently. – Orient Feb 27 '16 at 14:59
  • Alternate -unsatisfactory- solution that compiles under gcc and clang: ideone.com/uKP2qj – Ricardo Andrade Feb 29 '16 at 5:56
  • (void) is C-izm. operator const char * is currently wrong (error-prone): you may need to change definiton of value from value[sizeof...(C)] = {C...}; to value[sizeof...(C) + 1] = {C..., '\0'};, because currently its correctness depends on way of acquisition of source char array. – Orient Mar 1 '16 at 6:18
  • Just to be clear @Orient. The deal of the sizeof+1 is to be sure that there's a null terminator for operator const char* even when the template is instantiated directly (i.e. <'a', 'b', 'c'>) instead of an initialization from a literal string that already has the null terminator. Am I right? – Ricardo Andrade Mar 2 '16 at 5:01
  • Yes. I think so. Also char a[3] = {'1', '2', '3'}; is possilbe case. – Orient Mar 2 '16 at 6:03
1

Is this a satisfactory solution to meet your needs?

template <char ... C>
struct string_literal {
    static constexpr const char value[sizeof...(C)] = {C...};
    constexpr operator const char* (void) const {
        return value;
    }
    void foo() {std::cout << value << '\n';}
};
template <char ... C> constexpr const char string_literal<C...>::value[sizeof...(C)];

template <typename CharT, CharT... Cs>
constexpr string_literal<Cs...> operator ""_create() {
    return {};
}

int main() {
    string_literal<'t','e','s','t'> s = "test"_create;
    std::cout << s << '\n';  // test
    s.foo();  // test
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.