17

Is there a way to make something like this work in Kotlin without the reflection?

inline fun <reified T : kotlin.Enum<T>> safeValueOf(type: String?): T? {
    return java.lang.Enum.valueOf(T::class.java, type)
}

The example below doesn't compile due to:

Type parameter bound for T in inline fun <reified T : kotlin.Enum<T>> safeValueOf(type: kotlin.String?): T? is not satisfied: inferred type TestEnum? is not a subtype of kotlin.Enum<TestEnum?>

enum class TestEnum

fun main() {
    val value: TestEnum? = safeValueOf("test")
}
  • Your function works if you specify the type parameter value explicitly: val value = safeValueOf<TestEnum>("test") – yole Feb 27 '16 at 7:12
  • Why not just use Kotlin implementation of valueOf? – awesoon Feb 27 '16 at 7:13
  • @yole thanks, that's it. Do you mind posting this as the answer? – AndroidEx Feb 27 '16 at 7:16
  • 1
    Can I ask how this is safeValueOf? this can still throw exceptions – charlie_pl Mar 31 '17 at 10:34
  • 2
    @charlie_pl the question title doesn't really say anything about safety. The problem at that time was making this construct work, and, as you've correctly noted, the safeValueOf is not safe here as it's just a minimal example of the issue at hand. But you can easily imagine how it can be made safe from here. – AndroidEx Mar 31 '17 at 12:40
12

Your function works if you specify the type parameter value explicitly:

val value = safeValueOf<TestEnum>("test")

The original code is supposed to work as well, but doesn't work because of a bug in the type inference implementation: https://youtrack.jetbrains.com/issue/KT-11218

3

Since Kotlin 1.1, it's possible to access the constants in an enum class in a generic way, using the enumValues() and enumValueOf() functions:

enum class RGB { RED, GREEN, BLUE }

inline fun <reified T : Enum<T>> printAllValues() {
    print(enumValues<T>().joinToString { it.name })
}

printAllValues<RGB>() // prints RED, GREEN, BLUE

https://kotlinlang.org/docs/reference/enum-classes.html#working-with-enum-constants

0

Crash-safe Solution

Create an extension and then call valueOf<MyEnum>("value"). If the type is invalid, you'll get null and have to handle it

inline fun <reified T : Enum<T>> valueOf(type: String): T? {
    return try {
        java.lang.Enum.valueOf(T::class.java, type)
    } catch (e: IllegalArgumentException) {
        null
    }
}

Alternatively, you can set a default value, calling valueOf<MyEnum>("value", MyEnum.FALLBACK), and avoiding a null response. You can extend your specific enum to have the default be automatic

inline fun <reified T : Enum<T>> valueOf(type: String, default: T): T {
    return try {
        java.lang.Enum.valueOf(T::class.java, type)
    } catch (e: IllegalArgumentException) {
        default
    }
}

Or if you want both, make the second:

inline fun <reified T : Enum<T>> valueOf(type: String, default: T): T = valueOf<T>(type) ?: default

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