8

I've researched a little, but I found nothing that relates exactly to what I need and whenever tried to create the expression it is always a little off from what I require.

I attempted something along the lines of [AZaz09]{3,8}\-[AZaz09]{3,8}.

I want the valid result to only allow text-text, where either or the text can be alphabetical or numeric however the only symbol allowed is - and that is in between the two texts.

Each text must be at least three characters long ({3,8}?), then separated by the -.

Therefore for it to be valid some examples could be:

Text-Text
Abc-123
123-Abc
A2C-def4gk

Invalid tests could be:

Ab-3
Abc!-ajr4
a-bc3-25aj
a?c-b%
  • 1
    Do you want accented letters or other alphabets to also match? Like "déjà-vus", "12µ-13µ", "mañana-1234" – trincot Feb 27 '16 at 18:01
  • @trincot: Good point, have updated my answer to reflect the u modifier. – Jan Feb 27 '16 at 18:29
11

You need to use anchors and use the - so the characters in the character class are read as a range, not the individual characters.

Try:

^[A-Za-z0-9]{3,8}-[A-Za-z0-9]{3,8}$

Demo: https://regex101.com/r/xH3oM8/1

You also could simplify it a but with the i modifier and the \d meta character.

(?i)^[a-z\d]{3,8}-[a-z\d]{3,8}$
  • Top one seems to be perfect for my use :) – mhvvzmak1 Feb 27 '16 at 18:40
  • I noticed that in the site there is /gm at the end of the regex, what does this gm do and is it required? – mhvvzmak1 Feb 27 '16 at 18:50
  • 2
    g is a global modifier, m is multi-line. That is just to demonstrate there. The g isn't supported in PHP. The m makes the ^$ match each line, rather than the whole string. – chris85 Feb 27 '16 at 19:43
6

If accented letters should be allowed, or any other letter that exists in the Unicode range (like Greek or Cyrillic letters), then use the u modifier (for UTF-8 support) and \pL to match Unicode letters (and \d for digits):

$string ="
Mañana-déjà
Text-Text
Abc-123
123-Abc
A2C-def4gk
Ab-3
Abc!-ajr4
a-bc3-25aj
a?c-b%";

$regex='/^[\pL\d]{3,}-[\pL\d]{3,}$/mu';

preg_match_all($regex, $string, $matches);

var_export($matches);

Output:

array (
  0 => 
  array (
    0 => 'Mañana-déjà',
    1 => 'Text-Text',
    2 => 'Abc-123',
    3 => '123-Abc',
    4 => 'A2C-def4gk',
  ),
)

NB: the difference with \w is that [\pL\d] will not match an underscore.

5

You could come up with the following:

<?php
$string ="
Text-Text
Abc-123
123-Abc
A2C-def4gk
Ab-3
Abc!-ajr4
a-bc3-25aj
a?c-b%";

$regex='~
        ^\w{3,}  # at last three word characters at the beginning of the line
        -        # a dash
        \w{3,}$  # three word characters at the end of the line
        ~xm';    # multiline and freespacing mode (for this explanation)
                 # ~xmu for accented characters

preg_match_all($regex, $string, $matches);
print_r($matches);
?>

As @chris85 pointed out, \w will match an underscore as well. Trincot had a good comment (matching accented characters, that is). To achieve this, simply use the u modifier.
See a demo on regex101.com and a complete code on ideone.com.

  • The PHP won't work with the explanation in there, you should do that in the question's body by itself. – chris85 Feb 27 '16 at 18:00
  • @chris85: Why not??? - this is exactly what the x modifier is for. – Jan Feb 27 '16 at 18:04
  • @trincot never used x modifier but doesn't work here, eval.in/526650. I'll look at that modifier though. – chris85 Feb 27 '16 at 18:04
  • Ah, I see now, thats a tricky modifier I hadn't encountered, can't upvote twice. Still doesn't work in that other environment though, not sure why. – chris85 Feb 27 '16 at 18:07
3

You can use this regex

^\w{3,}-\w{3,}$

^       // start of the string
\w{3,}  // match "a" to "z", "A" to "Z" and 0 to 9 and requires at least 3 characters
-       // requires "-"
\w{3,}  // same as above
$       // end of the string

Regex Demo

3

And a short one.

^([^\W_]{3,8})-(?1)$

Demo at regex101

My vote for @chris85 which is most obvious and performant.

1

This one

^([\w]{3,8}-[\w]{3,8})$

https://regex101.com/r/uS8nB5/1

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.