I'm using angular 2. I have a component with an input. I want to be able to write some code when the input value changes. The binding is working, and if the data is changed (from outside the component) I can see that there is change in the dom.

@Component({
    selector: 'test'
})
@View({
    template: `
    <div>data.somevalue={{data.somevalue}}</div>`
})
export class MyComponent {

    _data: Data;
    @Input()
    set data(value: Data) {
        this.data = value;
    }
    get data() {
        return this._data;
    }

    constructor() {
    }

    dataChagedListener(param) {
        // listen to changes of _data object and do something...
    }
}
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could use the lifecycle hook ngOnChanges:

export class MyComponent {
  _data: Data;
  @Input()
  set data(value: Data) {
    this.data = value;
  }
  get data() {
    return this._data;
  }

  constructor() {
  }

  ngOnChanges([propName: string]: SimpleChange) {
    // listen to changes of _data object and do something...
  }
}

This hook is triggered when:

if any bindings have changed

See these links for more details:

  • the problem is that the data object is not a primitive value. I want to know when the member "somevalue" of data changes. – Ido Feb 28 '16 at 9:32
  • In fact, Angular2 won't detect this through ngOnChanges. The latter is only notified when references change not the content... See this issue: github.com/angular/angular/issues/6458 – Thierry Templier Feb 28 '16 at 9:47
  • Setting data will be detected (this.data = ...) but setting value on data properties won't (this.data.someValue = ...) – Thierry Templier Feb 28 '16 at 9:48

As mentioned in the comments of Thierry Templier's answer, ngOnChanges lifecycle hook can only detect changes to primitives. I found that by using ngDoCheck instead, you are able to check the state of the object manually to determine if the object's members have changed:

A full Plunker can be found here. But here's the important part:

import { Component, Input } from '@angular/core';

@Component({
    selector: 'listener',
    template: `
        <div style="background-color:#f2f2f2">
            <h3>Listener</h3>
            <p>{{primitive}}</p>
            <p>{{objectOne.foo}}</p>
            <p>{{objectTwo.foo.bar}}</p>

            <ul>
                <li *ngFor="let item of log">{{item}}</li>
            </ul>
        </div>
    `
})
export class ListenerComponent {
    @Input() protected primitive;
    @Input() protected objectOne;
    @Input() protected objectTwo;

    protected currentPrimitive;
    protected currentObjectOne;
    protected currentObjectTwo;

    protected log = ['Started'];

    ngOnInit() {
        this.getCurrentObjectState();
    }

    getCurrentObjectState() {
        this.currentPrimitive = this.primitive;
        this.currentObjectOne = _.clone(this.objectOne);
        this.currentObjectTwoJSON = JSON.stringify(this.objectTwo);
    }

    ngOnChanges() {
        this.log.push('OnChages Fired.')
    }

    ngDoCheck() {
        this.log.push('DoCheck Fired.');

        if (!_.isEqual(this.currentPrimitive, this.primitive)){
            this.log.push('A change in Primitive\'s state has occurred:');
            this.log.push('Primitive\'s new value:' + this.primitive);
        }

        if(!_.isEqual(this.currentObjectOne, this.objectOne)){
            this.log.push('A change in objectOne\'s state has occurred:');
            this.log.push('objectOne.foo\'s new value:' + this.objectOne.foo);
        }

        if(this.currentObjectTwoJSON != JSON.stringify(this.objectTwo)){
            this.log.push('A change in objectTwo\'s state has occurred:');
            this.log.push('objectTwo.foo.bar\'s new value:' + this.objectTwo.foo.bar);
        }

        if(!_.isEqual(this.currentPrimitive, this.primitive) || !_.isEqual(this.currentObjectOne, this.objectOne) || this.currentObjectTwoJSON != JSON.stringify(this.objectTwo)) {
             this.getCurrentObjectState();
        }
    }

It should be noted that the Angular documentation provides this caution about using ngDoCheck:

While the ngDoCheck hook can detect when the hero's name has changed, it has a frightful cost. This hook is called with enormous frequency — after every change detection cycle no matter where the change occurred. It's called over twenty times in this example before the user can do anything.

Most of these initial checks are triggered by Angular's first rendering of unrelated data elsewhere on the page. Mere mousing into another input box triggers a call. Relatively few calls reveal actual changes to pertinent data. Clearly our implementation must be very lightweight or the user experience will suffer.

  • I don't like what I see. This can kill performance. Is there any other way to cacth any change on object? – AngularOne Feb 23 '17 at 21:17
  • @AngularOne Yep. Performance is something to be mindful of with this, as noted with the quote from the documentation. I'm not aware of a better way to handle it (but I'm still pretty new to Angular myself!) – HPierce Feb 23 '17 at 21:45

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