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I have some machine learning results that I am trying to make sense of. The task is to predict/label "Irish" vs. "non-Irish". Python 2.7's output:

1= ir
0= non-ir
Class count:
0    4090942
1     940852
Name: ethnicity_scan, dtype: int64
Accuracy: 0.874921350119
Classification report:
             precision    recall  f1-score   support

          0       0.89      0.96      0.93   2045610
          1       0.74      0.51      0.60    470287

avg / total       0.87      0.87      0.87   2515897

Confusion matrix:
[[1961422   84188]
 [ 230497  239790]]
AUC-ir= 0.901238104773

As you can see, the precision and recall are mediocre, but the AUC-ROC is higher (~0.90). And I am trying to figure out why, which I suspect is due to data imbalance (about 1:5). Based on the confusion matrix, and using Irish as the target (+), I calculated the TPR=0.51 and FPR=0.04. If I am considering non-Irish as (+), then TPR=0.96 and FPR=0.49. So how can I get a 0.9 AUC while the TPR can be only 0.5 at FPR=0.04?

Codes:

try:
    for i in mass[k]:
        df = df_temp # reset df before each loop
        #$$
        #$$ 
        if 1==1:
        ###if i == singleEthnic:
            count+=1
            ethnicity_tar = str(i) # fr, en, ir, sc, others, ab, rus, ch, it, jp
            # fn, metis, inuit; algonquian, iroquoian, athapaskan, wakashan, siouan, salish, tsimshian, kootenay
            ############################################
            ############################################

            def ethnicity_target(row):
                try:
                    if row[ethnicity_var] == ethnicity_tar:
                        return 1
                    else:
                        return 0
                except: return None
            df['ethnicity_scan'] = df.apply(ethnicity_target, axis=1)
            print '1=', ethnicity_tar
            print '0=', 'non-'+ethnicity_tar

            # Random sampling a smaller dataframe for debugging
            rows = df.sample(n=subsample_size, random_state=seed) # Seed gives fixed randomness
            df = DataFrame(rows)
            print 'Class count:'
            print df['ethnicity_scan'].value_counts()

            # Assign X and y variables
            X = df.raw_name.values
            X2 = df.name.values
            X3 = df.gender.values
            X4 = df.location.values
            y = df.ethnicity_scan.values

            # Feature extraction functions
            def feature_full_name(nameString):
                try:
                    full_name = nameString
                    if len(full_name) > 1: # not accept name with only 1 character
                        return full_name
                    else: return '?'
                except: return '?'

            def feature_full_last_name(nameString):
                try:
                    last_name = nameString.rsplit(None, 1)[-1]
                    if len(last_name) > 1: # not accept name with only 1 character
                        return last_name
                    else: return '?'
                except: return '?'

            def feature_full_first_name(nameString):
                try:
                    first_name = nameString.rsplit(' ', 1)[0]
                    if len(first_name) > 1: # not accept name with only 1 character
                        return first_name
                    else: return '?'
                except: return '?'

            # Transform format of X variables, and spit out a numpy array for all features
            my_dict = [{'last-name': feature_full_last_name(i)} for i in X]
            my_dict5 = [{'first-name': feature_full_first_name(i)} for i in X]

            all_dict = []
            for i in range(0, len(my_dict)):
                temp_dict = dict(
                    my_dict[i].items() + my_dict5[i].items()
                    )
                all_dict.append(temp_dict)

            newX = dv.fit_transform(all_dict)

            # Separate the training and testing data sets
            X_train, X_test, y_train, y_test = cross_validation.train_test_split(newX, y, test_size=testTrainSplit)

            # Fitting X and y into model, using training data
            classifierUsed2.fit(X_train, y_train)

            # Making predictions using trained data
            y_train_predictions = classifierUsed2.predict(X_train)
            y_test_predictions = classifierUsed2.predict(X_test)

Inserted codes for resampling:

try:
    for i in mass[k]:
        df = df_temp # reset df before each loop
        #$$
        #$$ 
        if 1==1:
        ###if i == singleEthnic:
            count+=1
            ethnicity_tar = str(i) # fr, en, ir, sc, others, ab, rus, ch, it, jp
            # fn, metis, inuit; algonquian, iroquoian, athapaskan, wakashan, siouan, salish, tsimshian, kootenay
            ############################################
            ############################################

            def ethnicity_target(row):
                try:
                    if row[ethnicity_var] == ethnicity_tar:
                        return 1
                    else:
                        return 0
                except: return None
            df['ethnicity_scan'] = df.apply(ethnicity_target, axis=1)
            print '1=', ethnicity_tar
            print '0=', 'non-'+ethnicity_tar

            # Resampled
            df_resampled = df.append(df[df.ethnicity_scan==0].sample(len(df)*5, replace=True))

            # Random sampling a smaller dataframe for debugging
            rows = df_resampled.sample(n=subsample_size, random_state=seed) # Seed gives fixed randomness
            df = DataFrame(rows)
            print 'Class count:'
            print df['ethnicity_scan'].value_counts()

            # Assign X and y variables
            X = df.raw_name.values
            X2 = df.name.values
            X3 = df.gender.values
            X4 = df.location.values
            y = df.ethnicity_scan.values

            # Feature extraction functions
            def feature_full_name(nameString):
                try:
                    full_name = nameString
                    if len(full_name) > 1: # not accept name with only 1 character
                        return full_name
                    else: return '?'
                except: return '?'

            def feature_full_last_name(nameString):
                try:
                    last_name = nameString.rsplit(None, 1)[-1]
                    if len(last_name) > 1: # not accept name with only 1 character
                        return last_name
                    else: return '?'
                except: return '?'

            def feature_full_first_name(nameString):
                try:
                    first_name = nameString.rsplit(' ', 1)[0]
                    if len(first_name) > 1: # not accept name with only 1 character
                        return first_name
                    else: return '?'
                except: return '?'

            # Transform format of X variables, and spit out a numpy array for all features
            my_dict = [{'last-name': feature_full_last_name(i)} for i in X]
            my_dict5 = [{'first-name': feature_full_first_name(i)} for i in X]

            all_dict = []
            for i in range(0, len(my_dict)):
                temp_dict = dict(
                    my_dict[i].items() + my_dict5[i].items()
                    )
                all_dict.append(temp_dict)

            newX = dv.fit_transform(all_dict)

            # Separate the training and testing data sets
            X_train, X_test, y_train, y_test = cross_validation.train_test_split(newX, y, test_size=testTrainSplit)

            # Fitting X and y into model, using training data
            classifierUsed2.fit(X_train, y_train)

            # Making predictions using trained data
            y_train_predictions = classifierUsed2.predict(X_train)
            y_test_predictions = classifierUsed2.predict(X_test)
1

Your model outputs a probability P (between 0 and 1) for each row in the test set that it scores. The summary stats (precision, recall, etc) are for a single value of P as a prediction threshold, probably P=0.5, unless you've changed this in your code. However the ROC contains more information, the idea is that you probably won't want to use this default value as your prediction threshold, so the ROC is plotted by calculating the ratio of true positives to false positives, across every prediction threshold betwen 0 and 1.

If you've undersampled your non-Irish people in the data, then you're correct that the AUC and precision will be overestimated; if your dataset is only 5000 rows, then you will have no problem running your model on a larger training set; just rebalance your dataset (by bootstrap sampling to increase your non-Irish people) until your accurately reflect your sample population.

  • I haven't changed the P, so it should be 0.5. For reporting purposes, is it ok for me to report the existing precision, recall and ROC as is (while using the default P=0.5)? – KubiK888 Feb 28 '16 at 22:51
  • no it's definately not ok, you will be greatly exaggerating how effective your model is, don't do it! – maxymoo Feb 28 '16 at 22:55
  • Please help me understand where you are coming from, you seem to hint at the possible "exaggeration" of the effectiveness is due to the data imbalance. But I am using performance measures that should be sensitive to it (i.e. F1 score, precision, and recall). So why is reporting even the F1 score, precision, and recall are exaggerating the performance? (note: I heard about over/undersampling technique for imbalance data, but they have their own pitfalls like losing information or modelling too closely with the duplicated noise, etc) – KubiK888 Feb 28 '16 at 23:16
  • Or are you just saying it will exaggerate ROC measure only? If so, does making the AUC-ROC graph help? – KubiK888 Feb 28 '16 at 23:17
  • if you report that your precision is 89% then you're saying "my model can correctly predict 89% of the time". however because you undersampled non-irish people, you're exaggerating how well your model performs, if you rerun your model on a new test set which is not undersampled, the precision will be a lot worse, maybe only 30%. think about it, if i go into a room and kick out a whole bunch of the non-irish people, suddenly i get a whole lot better at telling if people are irish, even if i'm just guessing at random! – maxymoo Feb 28 '16 at 23:31

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