I've a document from which I need to extract some data. Document contain strings like these

Text:"How secure is my information?"

I need to extract text which is in double quotes after the literal Text:

How secure is my information?

How do I do this with regex in Javascript

  • 9
    That's not lookbehind (or even lookahead). – Matt Ball Aug 25 '10 at 18:37
  • How would the regex with lookbehind look like? – inetphantom Mar 17 '16 at 12:48
  • @MattBall, how do you figure? One could match on one or more characters with a lookbehind for Text:" and a lookahead for ". – henrebotha Jun 24 '16 at 8:52
  • I suppose I can understand thinking about lookbehind as a solution for this, but it's much better suited for grouping parentheses. i.e. /Text: "([^"]*)"/ – Vince Mar 15 '17 at 0:15
up vote 44 down vote accepted

Lookbehind assertions were recently finalised for JavaScript and will be in the next publication of the ECMA-262 specification. They are supported in Chrome 66 (Opera 53), but no other major browsers at the time of writing.

var str = 'Text:"How secure is my information?"',
    reg = /(?<=Text:")[^"]+(?=")/;

str.match(reg)[0];
// -> How secure is my information?

Older browsers do not support lookbehind in JavaScript regular expression. You have to use capturing parenthesis for expressions like this one instead:

var str = 'Text:"How secure is my information?"',
    reg = /Text:"([^"]+)"/;

str.match(reg)[1];
// -> How secure is my information?

This will not cover all the lookbehind assertion use cases, however.

  • 3
    But how do I extract all such data from a large document? Say into an array or something? – Raj Aug 25 '10 at 19:00
  • 1
    Hm. I get an undefined when I test the above code. When I console the str.match(reg) without index 1, it outputs ["Text:"How secure is my information?""] thoughts? – jmk2142 Jun 19 '13 at 14:42
  • 1
    @orangewarp: the g modifier needed removing for the example in my answer. – Andy E Jun 19 '13 at 14:50
  • 5
    Cool. Works. Why does the g modifier kill the capturing parentheses? I was wondering because I can imagine a scenario where you might have multiple targets in a string. str = 'Something <id="12345"> more things <id="qwerty>" ...' If I wanted all id values in an array, it seems you would want to use g but then the capturing parentheses would be gone. What would the best way be here? reg = /id="([^"]+)"/g; -> ["id="12345"","id="qwerty""] -> then run a foreach with /id="([^"]+)"/ ? Can it be done in one regex step? – jmk2142 Jun 19 '13 at 15:55
  • 2
    @orangewarp: that's the standard behaviour for match with a global flag. It basically repeats a call to exec behind the scenes, returning only the first element from the result array in each iteration. The best solution is probably to run your own loop, calling RegExp.prototype.exec and parsing the result yourself, or use the search and don't replace method (both of which are more or less the same, but the latter offers a little more convenience in some cases). – Andy E Jun 20 '13 at 7:45

I just want to add something: JavaScript doesn't support lookbehinds like (?<= ) or (?<! ).

But it does support lookaheads like (?= ) or (?! ).

You can just do:

/Text:"(.*?)"/

Explanation:

  • Text:" : To be matched literally
  • .*? : To match anything in non-greedy way
  • () : To capture the match
  • " : To match a literal "
  • / / : delimiters
  • How do you use this? Do you have some context? – Sjoerd Aug 25 '10 at 18:39
  • that is the regex, you are supposed to use it with for instance .match() – Crayon Violent Aug 25 '10 at 22:56
string.match(/Text:"([^"]*)"/g)
  • 1
    How to avoid matching Text: in the result? – Raj Aug 25 '10 at 19:30
  • 1
    string[0] will always have the full regex match. string[1] will have the captured text. If there was a 2nd capture (parenthesis) in the regex, it would be put in string[2], etc... – Crayon Violent Aug 25 '10 at 19:59
  • I think with /g flag you will only get full regex match for all matches. – Raj Aug 25 '10 at 21:16
  • 1
    The g modifier will look for everything on the page that matches, not just stop at the first match. You said you have strings (plural), so that's why I put the /g modifier there. – Crayon Violent Aug 25 '10 at 22:54
<script type="text/javascript">
var str = 'Text:"How secure is my information?"';
var obj = eval('({'+str+'})')
console.log(obj.Text);
</script>
  • 5
    Modern browsers also have JSON.parse, which may be preferred over eval. – Sjoerd Jun 20 '12 at 12:39

If you want to avoid the regular expression all together you can do:

var texts = file.split('Text:"').slice(1).map(function (text) {
  return text.slice(0, text.lastIndexOf('"')); 
});

Here is an example showing how you can approach this.

1) Given this input string:

const inputText = 
`Text:"How secure is my information?"someRandomTextHere
Voice:"Not very much"
Text:"How to improve this?"
Voice:"Don't use '123456' for your password"
Text:"OK just like in the "Hackers" movie."`;

2) Extract data in double quotes after the literal Text: so that the results is an array with all matches like so:

["How secure is my information?",
 "How to improve this?",
 "OK just like in the \"Hackers\" movie."]

SOLUTION

function getText(text) {
  return text
    .match(/Text:".*"/g)
    .map(item => item.match(/^Text:"(.*)"/)[1]);
}

console.log(JSON.stringify(    getText(inputText)    ));

RUN SNIPPET TO SEE A WORKING DEMO

const inputText = 
`Text:"How secure is my information?"someRandomTextHere
Voice:"Not very much"
Text:"How to improve this?"
Voice:"Don't use '123456' for your password"
Text:"OK just like in the "Hackers" movie."`;



function getText(text) {
  return text
    .match(/Text:".*"/g)
    .map(item => item.match(/^Text:"(.*)"/)[1]);
}

console.log(JSON.stringify(    getText(inputText)    ));

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