2

I found a piece of code on the internet that has a really simple objective, yet it uses an ugly approach. Supposedly, the author is using a switch case to determine if a few (non-contiguous) values of a previously-defined Enum belong in their scope. If it does, the function returns true and that's that. Else, it returns false.

It practically looks like this:

switch(value) {
case ONE:
case TWO:
/* many similar lines later */
case TWENTY:
case TWENTY_FIVE:
/* an afternoon later */
case ONE_HUNDRED:
    return true;
default:
    return false;
}

Their use of a switch case is justified with having an instant lookup thanks to a jump table generated by the compiler (even though a jump table doesn't necessarily mean instant lookup from what I've gathered). Even so, this generates countless needless lines of code.

I've read about function inlining and using an array of function pointers, but I don't know how to use that in such a specific case.

How do I avoid writing many lines of case X: with such a simple case (no pun intended) as this?

  • 2
    Utterly long switch and/or if statements are usually a sign of poor usage of OOP – hgiesel Feb 29 '16 at 18:21
  • 2
    @henrikgiesel, where did OOP come from? – SergeyA Feb 29 '16 at 18:22
  • 1
    What exactly is your question? I don't get it. – Christian Hackl Feb 29 '16 at 18:24
  • 4
    if (value > ONE && value < ONE_HUNDRED)? – SergeyA Feb 29 '16 at 18:24
  • 2
    What do you expect to gain by using an array of function pointers? If an array of function pointers was faster than a switch, compiler developers would start implementing switches with functions pointers... – fredoverflow Feb 29 '16 at 18:24
9

Computing a boolean value efficiently based on some bound integral number is a job for bit twiddling:

const unsigned long long ps[2] = {0x28208a20a08a28ac, 0x800228a202088288};

bool is_prime(unsigned x)
{
    return (x < 128) && ((ps[x >> 6] >> (x & 63)) & 1);
}

If you look at the binary representation of the numbers stored in the array, a 1 bit signifies a prime number, and a 0 bit signifies a compound number:

   2    8    2    0    8    a    2    0    a    0    8    a    2    8    a    c
0010 1000 0010 0000 1000 1010 0010 0000 1010 0000 1000 1010 0010 1000 1010 1100
    59             47     41           31        23     17      11      5   2
 61        53           43     37        29           19     13       7    3

To scale this to more than 128 numbers, simply increase the array size and patch the < comparison in is_prime. The constants 6 and 63 stem from the amount of bits in an unsigned long long.

  • 3
    But bit twiddling is scary :/ – SolaGratia Feb 29 '16 at 19:43
  • Did you happen to remember 0x28208a20a08a28ac for this use? , so bit twiddling requires remembering/copy paste of hex numbers? – Angelus Mortis Mar 8 '16 at 16:12
  • 1
    @AngelusMortis No, I wrote a program to generate the number. – fredoverflow Mar 8 '16 at 16:23
  • Indeed bit twiddling is scary, it hurt my brain :D – Angelus Mortis Mar 8 '16 at 16:42
3

Avoid a repeating and simple switch case in C/C++?

Yes, do avoid this.. You should normally work at the highest level of abstraction possible at any given domain/context, whether this is compile-time polymorphism (e.g. using templates), object-oriented programming or, simpler control structures.. First come correctness, code clarity and efficiency and then comes optimisation (and only after proper measurement)

In this particular case you could simply do this:

return (value < 100);

I don't see why a 100+ lines switch statement is better.. even if it's faster (which is just an assumption in the absence of actual measurements) it'll only be slightly faster anyway so does it deserve all this fuss?? No, or at least no in most real-life scenarios.. If the application is that critical, optimising such code is better done in assembly language anyway..

As far as function inlining and arrays of function pointers - I'm not sure I understand what the questions is, but nevertheless, if you don't understand how to use such features for optimisation, don't use them.. let the compiler optimise your code instead.

  • 1
    Not being a C/C++ expert, why would a switch statement be faster? From my understanding, it has to compare the value 100 times, while if does it only once. – sjaustirni Feb 29 '16 at 18:35
  • 3
    Definitely return value < 100; please... – Barry Feb 29 '16 at 18:36
  • indeed.. I'll edit this out.. – Marinos K Feb 29 '16 at 18:38
  • Taking into account that not all enum values are present in this list (a.k.a. they're not contiguous), I could use, as @RodrigoGuiotti suggested, comparing the ends of each "bunch" of enum values. – Keyaku Feb 29 '16 at 18:42
0

Since you have an odd enum, skipping values, you can invert your solution. But you will need to declare skipped numbers (if it is skipping only a few).

if( value > ONE_HUNDRED || value < ONE )
{
    return false;
}
else
{
    switch(value)
    {
         case SKIPPED_FIRST:
         case SKIPPED_SECOND:
         {
             return false;
         }
         break;
         default:
         {
             return true;
         }
    }
}
  • I think it's best your other suggestion; this answer presents more code declaration for a big amount of skipped values. – Keyaku Feb 29 '16 at 18:43
  • You forgot the keyword case: Syntax Error. – abelenky Feb 29 '16 at 18:44
  • no problem, just couldnt suggest that in a comment – Rodrigo Guiotti Feb 29 '16 at 18:45

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