53

I'd like to create a split violin density plot using ggplot, like the fourth example on this page of the seaborn documentation.

enter image description here

Here is some data:

set.seed(20160229)

my_data = data.frame(
    y=c(rnorm(1000), rnorm(1000, 0.5), rnorm(1000, 1), rnorm(1000, 1.5)),
    x=c(rep('a', 2000), rep('b', 2000)),
    m=c(rep('i', 1000), rep('j', 2000), rep('i', 1000))
)

I can plot dodged violins like this:

library('ggplot2')

ggplot(my_data, aes(x, y, fill=m)) +
  geom_violin()

enter image description here

But it's hard to visually compare the widths at different points in the side-by-side distributions. I haven't been able to find any examples of split violins in ggplot - is it possible?

I found a base R graphics solution but the function is quite long and I want to highlight distribution modes, which are easy to add as additional layers in ggplot but will be harder to do if I need to figure out how to edit that function.

71
+500

Or, to avoid fiddling with the densities, you could extend ggplot2's GeomViolin like this:

GeomSplitViolin <- ggproto("GeomSplitViolin", GeomViolin, 
                           draw_group = function(self, data, ..., draw_quantiles = NULL) {
  data <- transform(data, xminv = x - violinwidth * (x - xmin), xmaxv = x + violinwidth * (xmax - x))
  grp <- data[1, "group"]
  newdata <- plyr::arrange(transform(data, x = if (grp %% 2 == 1) xminv else xmaxv), if (grp %% 2 == 1) y else -y)
  newdata <- rbind(newdata[1, ], newdata, newdata[nrow(newdata), ], newdata[1, ])
  newdata[c(1, nrow(newdata) - 1, nrow(newdata)), "x"] <- round(newdata[1, "x"])

  if (length(draw_quantiles) > 0 & !scales::zero_range(range(data$y))) {
    stopifnot(all(draw_quantiles >= 0), all(draw_quantiles <=
      1))
    quantiles <- ggplot2:::create_quantile_segment_frame(data, draw_quantiles)
    aesthetics <- data[rep(1, nrow(quantiles)), setdiff(names(data), c("x", "y")), drop = FALSE]
    aesthetics$alpha <- rep(1, nrow(quantiles))
    both <- cbind(quantiles, aesthetics)
    quantile_grob <- GeomPath$draw_panel(both, ...)
    ggplot2:::ggname("geom_split_violin", grid::grobTree(GeomPolygon$draw_panel(newdata, ...), quantile_grob))
  }
  else {
    ggplot2:::ggname("geom_split_violin", GeomPolygon$draw_panel(newdata, ...))
  }
})

geom_split_violin <- function(mapping = NULL, data = NULL, stat = "ydensity", position = "identity", ..., 
                              draw_quantiles = NULL, trim = TRUE, scale = "area", na.rm = FALSE, 
                              show.legend = NA, inherit.aes = TRUE) {
  layer(data = data, mapping = mapping, stat = stat, geom = GeomSplitViolin, 
        position = position, show.legend = show.legend, inherit.aes = inherit.aes, 
        params = list(trim = trim, scale = scale, draw_quantiles = draw_quantiles, na.rm = na.rm, ...))
}

And use the new geom_split_violin like this:

ggplot(my_data, aes(x, y, fill = m)) + geom_split_violin()

enter image description here

7
  • 1
    What if I want different colors for groups "a" and "b"? THanks! Sep 28 '17 at 21:18
  • 2
    @user3236841 Not sure in which case this was desirable, but as it's implemented with modulus it might already work? Did you try to use 4 levels in the factor m ? If you only have two levels you could use: ggplot(my_data, aes(x, y, fill=interaction(x,m))) + geom_split_violin() to get different colors, I think.
    – jan-glx
    Sep 29 '17 at 9:14
  • 1
    Yes, indeed, this works! Thanks. Useful when the distributions for a and b are of different things, and distributions are standardized, perhaps. Sep 29 '17 at 13:29
  • 3
    Also see here for some mostly working code about plotting quantiles on split violins based on this function.
    – Axeman
    Dec 5 '17 at 11:50
  • 1
    I think this is a fantastic function. However, I prefer using @Axeman 's solution, because it returns a continuous x-axis. I am sure there is a way to use the underlying (continuous) density distribution in your geom too, but it's not as straight forward to me.
    – tjebo
    May 21 '18 at 10:25
51

Note: I think the answer by jan-glx is much better, and most people should use that instead. But sometimes, the manual approach is still helpful to do weird things.


You can achieve this by calculating the densities yourself beforehand, and then plotting polygons. See below for a rough idea.

Get densities

library(dplyr)
pdat <- my_data %>%
  group_by(x, m) %>%
  do(data.frame(loc = density(.$y)$x,
                dens = density(.$y)$y))

Flip and offset densities for the groups

pdat$dens <- ifelse(pdat$m == 'i', pdat$dens * -1, pdat$dens)
pdat$dens <- ifelse(pdat$x == 'b', pdat$dens + 1, pdat$dens)

Plot

ggplot(pdat, aes(dens, loc, fill = m, group = interaction(m, x))) + 
  geom_polygon() +
  scale_x_continuous(breaks = 0:1, labels = c('a', 'b')) +
  ylab('density') +
  theme_minimal() +
  theme(axis.title.x = element_blank())

Result

enter image description here

4
  • 1
    How would you calculate densities if there are thee groups (e.g. i, j and x)
    – user702846
    Sep 15 '16 at 21:03
  • 1
    What should the three-group plot look like? It might be hard to visualize if you want to show density curves for all three groups within each violin.
    – user102162
    Sep 24 '16 at 17:04
  • that's a great option for cases where the original data is huge. Pre-calculating densities make the plot a lot more lightweight! Sep 16 '19 at 9:00
  • 1
    Tremendous!! I managed to get your method working with plotnine. I wanted to use plotnine rather than seaborn to give a consistent feel with other charts and the first solution looked too difficult to implement. Your was easy. Fantastic solution!
    – brb
    Mar 2 at 12:28

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