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I'm developing a Client/Server-Application with ASP.Net WebAPI and WPF. Right now I'm thinking of authenticating the client with basic authentication over https. You can suggest better solutions but windows authentication and server side sessions won't work for me.

For basic authentication I need the password on the client in plain text (base64) to send it over the wire on every request, right?

But i don't want the user to reenter the password on every request, so I have a Login-Window on the application start.

The WPF PasswordBox uses SecureString and is not bound to the viewmodel. But at least right before the request I have to get the password as normal string to encode it to base64. So sooner or later the password is in RAM in plain text no matter what I do.

What are the best practices to hold the password for later requests?

  • cache the PasswordBox
  • cache the SecureString
  • cache a plain text string because it will be in RAM either way
  • cache the base64 encoded string because at least it is obscure ;)
  • ...?

So how do I handle this in a reasonably secure way? Other applications by big players (MS, Google, Apple, ...) don't request my password for every call, so there has to be a way.

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  • Why on Earth do you want to send the password as Base64? That is a simple, non-encrypted, encoding, and all that using it will do for you is use a tiny bit more memory. Base64 is normally used to encode binary data as a string, not a string as a longer string. – ProfK Oct 14 '16 at 4:15
  • First I want to thank you for stressing this, because talking about security topics this is something one should know. You are absolutely right about base64 not really helping in this case. I know that and I knew that before asking this question. That is why I wrote: at least it is obscure ;) But why base64? Because that is how basic authentication works with WebAPI: see asp.net-site – alex Oct 28 '16 at 6:06
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You should read into authentication tokens, this is a commonly used method and the asp.net-web-api framework provides a lot of functionality provided by OWin.

Basically the flow is as follows:

  • Authenticate at your web-api.
  • Return a token
  • Use this token in the header of every following web-api/http request

The benefits:

  • Doesn't store the username and password in memory (well, just for a single call)
  • Token can be invalidated at server side
  • Functionality out of the box with web-api2

You can read about it here: http://bitoftech.net/2014/06/01/token-based-authentication-asp-net-web-api-2-owin-asp-net-identity/

As for your WPF client:

You can create a .net client for your http/web-api requests by using the:

HttpClient https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.net.http.httpclient%28v=vs.118%29.aspx

Some psuedo code will look like this:

public async Task<IEnumerable<DataContainer>> GetDataForTarget(string id)
{
    var requestMessage = new HttpRequestMessage(HttpMethod.Post, new Uri(new Uri(Host),
        string.Format("api/Data?id={0}", id)));

        var response = await Client.SendAsync(requestMessage);

        //etc...
}

Note: For the token based security to work you'll need https, otherwise the token can be intercepted. Everybody who knows the token can make calls to the web-api on behalf of the corresponding user. So, basically the problem shifts from securing the password to securing the token. The benefit of a token is that it should have a much shorter lifetime than a password, thats why it's more secure. Nevertheless it's arguable to store the token in a SecureString.

Meanwhile at the server side

It's is good practice (or even unethical if you don't) to, provided that users can pick their own passwords, you use a one-way encryption mechanism at your server to store the passwords.

This can be accomplished by using a (encryption-strong) random salt and a asymmetric-hash encryption using that salt.

To verify the user, just encrypt the incoming password with the stored salt and check if it gives you the stored hash value. In this case no actual passwords will be stored at your server and there is no way to retrieve the users password (.... well ehh excluded some technical details).

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  • Thanks, the link to bitoftech.net already enlightened me a bit. Until now I thought tokens imply server state and need shared sessions for multiple servers. But according to that site tokens are self contained. So I'll read into that. You mentioned that the first request still has the plain password in memory. Is there anything I should do to get rid of it as fast as possible or is that something I have to leave to the GC? – alex Mar 1 '16 at 10:14
  • Well, the problem with a securestring for example is that, when you want to use it, you'll need to convert it to a normal string, which isn't secure. So in this case, if you make sure the hosting strings or textboxes are cleared before you move on it is the best you can do. – Stefan Mar 1 '16 at 10:32
  • One other thing: for the token based security to work you'll need https, otherwise the token can be intercepted. Everybody who knows the token can make calls to the web-api on behalf of the corresponding user. So, basically the problem shifts from securing the password to securing the token. The benefit of a token is that it should have a much shorter lifetime than a password, thats why it's more secure. Nevertheless it's arguable to store the token in a SecureString. I'll ad this to my answer. – Stefan Mar 1 '16 at 10:36
  • https was already configured and testet, but thanks for the advice. Certificate pinning is on my list. It works like a charm and I have a good feeling about it, so I accepted your answer. just one litte follow up question: The token service returns json with the members access_token, token_type and expires_in. do you know if there is any built in class representing that object? I did my own because I couldn't find one and of course it works. But if there is a build in one I'd prefer that – alex Mar 7 '16 at 7:16
  • @alex; I do know of any strong types that provide such a datacontainer. If you are using Microsoft.Owin there exist an AuthenticationProperties but as far as I know this uses a Dictionary<string,string>, which would be as 'loosly' as the JSON variant. – Stefan Mar 8 '16 at 10:17

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