8

I am trying to make a producer/consumer thread situation more efficient by skipping expensive event operations if necessary with something like:

//cas(variable, compare, set) is atomic compare and swap
//queue is already lock free

running = false


// dd item to queue – producer thread(s)

if(cas(running, false, true))
{
  // We effectively obtained a lock on signalling the event
  add_to_queue()
  signal_event()
}
else
{
  // Most of the time if things are busy we should not be signalling the event
  add_to_queue()

  if(cas(running, false, true))
    signal_event()
}

...

// Process queue, single consumer thread

reset_event()

while(1)
{
  wait_for_auto_reset_event() // Preferably IOCP

  for(int i = 0; i &lt SpinCount; ++i)
    process_queue()

  cas(running, true, false)

  if(queue_not_empty())
    if(cas(running, false, true))
      signal_event()
}

Obviously trying to get these things correct is a little tricky(!) so is the above pseudo code correct? A solution that signals the event more than is exactly needed is ok but not one that does so for every item.

  • In which language is your code? – Marcel Nov 30 '10 at 14:36
  • Are event operations expensive only or is the consumer thread processing expensive as well? (and you want to avoid that too?) – Sedat Kapanoglu Dec 7 '10 at 7:51
  • Sorry I have only just noticed all this feedback now! It's in C++ although I am interested in replicated similar in CSharp. An event synchronisation operation is the most expensive thing if its being taken for each item in the queue. – iam Dec 14 '10 at 6:18
2

This falls into the sub-category of "stop messing about and go back to work" known as "premature optimisation". :-)

If the "expensive" event operations are taking up a significant portion of time, your design is wrong, and rather than use a producer/consumer you should use a critical section/mutex and just do the work from the calling thread.

I suggest you profile your application if you are really concerned.

Updated:

Correct answer:

Producer

ProducerAddToQueue(pQueue,pItem){

    EnterCriticalSection(pQueue->pCritSec)
        if(IsQueueEmpty(pQueue)){
            SignalEvent(pQueue->hEvent)
        }

        AddToQueue(pQueue, pItem)
    LeaveCriticalSection(pQueue->pCritSec)
}

Consumer

nCheckQuitInterval = 100; // Every 100 ms consumer checks if it should quit.

ConsumerRun(pQueue)
{
    while(!ShouldQuit())
    {
        Item* pCurrentItem = NULL;
        EnterCriticalSection(pQueue-pCritSec);
            if(IsQueueEmpty(pQueue))
            {
                ResetEvent(pQueue->hEvent)
            }
            else
            {
                pCurrentItem = RemoveFromQueue(pQueue);
            }
        LeaveCriticalSection(pQueue->pCritSec);

        if(pCurrentItem){
            ProcessItem(pCurrentItem);
            pCurrentItem = NULL;
        }
        else
        {
            // Wait for items to be added.
            WaitForSingleObject(pQueue->hEvent, nCheckQuitInterval);
        }

    }
}

Notes:

  • The event is a manual-reset event.
  • The operations protected by the critical section are quick. The event is only set or reset when the queue transitions to/from empty state. It has to be set/reset within the critical section to avoid a race condition.
  • This means the critical section is only held for a short time. so contention will be rare.
  • Critical sections don't block unless they are contended. So context switches will be rare.

Assumptions:

  • This is a real problem not homework.
  • Producers and consumers spend most of their time doing other stuff, i.e. getting the items ready for the queue, processing them after removing them from the queue.
  • If they are spending most of the time doing the actual queue operations, you shouldn't be using a queue. I hope that is obvious.
  • I'm sorry but that's a pretty bad answer although I appreciate you are trying to help. Critical sections and mutexes are too slow for the kind of throughput I am working with. A lot of this comes from the possible OS context switches that can happen. – iam Mar 4 '11 at 1:00
  • @wb, you are just reinventing the critical section. This is precisely the problem critical sections are designed to solve, so just use them. they don't block unless there is contention – Ben Mar 4 '11 at 13:26
  • To be clear, your proposed solution is to use a memory barrier/interlocked compare and exchange operation to avoid having to signal or wait on an event object/semaphore. This is exactly what critical sections do, and your example is exactly the reason they do it. That's why the answer to your question is "use a critical section" - not because there is anything wrong with your idea, but because it has already been invented. – Ben Mar 4 '11 at 15:27
0

Went thru a bunch of cases, can't see an issue. But it's kinda complicated. I thought maybe you would have an issue with queue_not_empty / add_to_queue racing. But looks like the post-dominating CAS in both paths covers this case.

CAS is expensive (not as expensive as signal). If you expect skipping the signal to be common, I would code the CAS as follows:

bool cas(variable, old_val, new_val) {
   if (variable != old_val) return false
   asm cmpxchg
}

Lock-free structures like this is the stuff that Jinx (the product I work on) is very good at testing. So you might want to use an eval license to test the lock-free queue and signal optimization logic.


Edit: maybe you can simplify this logic.

running = false 

// add item to queue – producer thread(s) 
add_to_queue()
if (cas(running, false, true)) {
   signal_event()
}

// Process queue, single consumer thread 

reset_event() 

while(1) 
{ 
    wait_for_auto_reset_event() // Preferably IOCP 

   for(int i = 0; i &lt SpinCount; ++i) 
       process_queue() 

   cas(running, true, false)  // this could just be a memory barriered store of false

   if(queue_not_empty()) 
      if(cas(running, false, true)) 
         signal_event() 
} 

Now that the cas/signal are always next to each other they can be moved into a subroutine.

  • Sorry I missed all these comments until now - thank you for yours! - and I am just taking the time to digest what you have said now... – iam Dec 14 '10 at 6:21
  • On the first part of your comment (As I start to remember my train of thought from before!) - yes I structured it around that way on purpose (I think!) to deal with a race condition I remember being caused in an example like Anthony's answer. I think I was going for the lesser of evils - by having the worker in some instances loop around possibly more times than needed in the worst case.I am digesting your suggestion more now and your comment about the memory barrier store I was previously wondering about something like that but decide to try and get it working with interlocked stuff first :) – iam Dec 14 '10 at 6:49
0

Why not just associate a bool with the event? Use cas to set it to true, and if the cas succeeds then signal the event because the event must have been clear. The waiter can then just clear the flag before it waits

bool flag=false;

// producer
add_to_queue();
if(cas(flag,false,true))
{
    signal_event();
}

// consumer
while(true)
{
    while(queue_not_empty())
    {
        process_queue();
    }
    cas(flag,true,false); // clear the flag
    if(queue_is_empty())
        wait_for_auto_reset_event();
}

This way, you only wait if there are no elements on the queue, and you only signal the event once for each batch of items.

  • 1
    Sorry ignore my last comment I hit return too fast! - I think I tried something like this but worked out there was a race condition with it between the clear the flag bit and the queue being empty. – iam Dec 14 '10 at 6:41
0

I believe, you want to achieve something like in this question:
WinForms Multithreading: Execute a GUI update only if the previous one has finished. It is specific on C# and Winforms, but the structure may well apply for you.

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