70

Is there any way I can find in SQL Server Management Studio stored procedure by name or by part of the name? (on active database context)

Thanks for help

120

You can use:

select * 
from 
   sys.procedures 
where 
   name like '%name_of_proc%'

if you need the code you can look in the syscomments table

select text 
from 
    syscomments c
    inner join sys.procedures p on p.object_id = c.object_id
where 
    p.name like '%name_of_proc%'

Edit Update:

you can can also use the ansi standard version

SELECT * 
FROM 
    INFORMATION_SCHEMA.ROUTINES 
WHERE 
    ROUTINE_NAME LIKE '%name_of_proc%'
  • If you want to get text of the sp with name, it is easier with use "sp_helptext SPNAME" – Ali Nov 8 '17 at 17:42
  • 1
    Sql 2012, had to do inner join sys.procedures p on p.object_id = c.id instead – user5226582 Apr 16 '18 at 8:17
  • 1
    Note for SQL Server the ANSI standard version cuts off the ROUTINE_DEFINITION at 8k. You can use object_definition(object_id(r.ROUTINE_NAME)), as an alternative it that is an issue. – Mark Schultheiss May 4 '18 at 10:30
  • +1 for the ANSI standard version which returns catalog (database) and schema in case you're not sure where the procedure sits. (By way of example, I found an Agent job referencing a procedure I could not easily locate; the ANSI standard query solved this for me). – youcantryreachingme Sep 26 '18 at 1:05
41

Assuming you're in the Object Explorer Details (F7) showing the list of Stored Procedures, click the Filters button and enter the name (or partial name).

alt text

  • 2
    Thank you so much I did not know about the filter thing somehow i never saw that button. – Chad Portman May 12 '16 at 14:57
5

This will work for tables and views (among other things) as well, not just sprocs:

SELECT
    '[' + s.name + '].[' + o.Name + ']',
    o.type_desc
FROM
    sys.objects o
    JOIN sys.schemas s ON s.schema_id = o.schema_id
WHERE
    o.name = 'CreateAllTheThings' -- if you are certain of the exact name
    OR o.name LIKE '%CreateAllThe%' -- if you are not so certain

It also gives you the schema name which will be useful in any non-trivial database (e.g. one where you need a query to find a stored procedure by name).

  • 1
    Migrating a legacy app from sql 2005 to 2016 my script got 'incorrect syntax near '@errorMessage', which was not terribly helpful. When I ran the same sql in SSSM, it added "in procedure 'some_name'", but there was no such stored procedure anywhere! Turned out it was a trigger, and your query found it. Thanks! – mickeyf Mar 30 '17 at 19:37
1

You can use this query:

SELECT 
    ROUTINE_CATALOG AS DatabaseName ,
    ROUTINE_SCHEMA AS SchemaName,
    SPECIFIC_NAME AS SPName ,
    ROUTINE_DEFINITION AS SPBody ,
    CREATED AS CreatedDate,
    LAST_ALTERED AS LastModificationDate
FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.ROUTINES
WHERE 
    (ROUTINE_DEFINITION LIKE '%%')
    AND 
    (ROUTINE_TYPE='PROCEDURE')
    AND
    (SPECIFIC_NAME LIKE '%AssessmentToolDegreeDel')

As you can see, you can do search inside the body of Stored Procedure also.

0

Very neat trick I stumble upon trying some SQL injection, in object explorer in the search box just use your percentage characters, and this will search EVERYTHING stored procedures, functions, views, tables, schema, indexes...I tired of thinking of more :)

Search Pattern

0

When I have a Store Procedure name, and do not know which database it belongs to, I use the following -

Use [master]
GO

DECLARE @dbname VARCHAR(50)   
DECLARE @statement NVARCHAR(max)

DECLARE db_cursor CURSOR 
LOCAL FAST_FORWARD
FOR  
--Status 48 (mirrored db)
SELECT name FROM MASTER.dbo.sysdatabases WHERE STATUS NOT LIKE 48 AND name NOT IN ('master','model','msdb','tempdb','distribution')  

OPEN db_cursor  
FETCH NEXT FROM db_cursor INTO @dbname  
WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0  
BEGIN  

SELECT @statement = 'SELECT * FROM ['+@dbname+'].INFORMATION_SCHEMA.ROUTINES  WHERE [ROUTINE_NAME] LIKE ''%name_of_proc%'''+';'
print @statement

EXEC sp_executesql @statement

FETCH NEXT FROM db_cursor INTO @dbname  
END  
CLOSE db_cursor  
DEALLOCATE db_cursor

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