1

This question already has an answer here:

My problem is that I've got 2 class: parent and child.

Parent class is abstract and child extends from them.

Then I've got a method that return a parent ArrayList and I need cast it to ArrayList of child.

What I should do?

marked as duplicate by Toby Speight, Tom, Tunaki java Mar 2 '16 at 19:54

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2

You could do by the following way:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

    abstract class Parent {
        void callMe(){
            System.out.println("Parent"); 
        } 
    } 
    class Child extends Parent {
        void callMe(){
            System.out.println("Child");
        }
    }
    public class TestClass {
        public static void main(String[] args) {
            List<Parent> alist=new ArrayList<Parent>();
            List<? super Child> alist2=alist;
        }
    }

List<Parent> is not same as List<Child>. Compilor does not allow to assign the reference of List<Parent> to List<Child> even though List contains only Child Object.

For Example:

List<Parent>  parentList=new ArryList<Parent>();
parentList.add(new Child());
parentList.add(new Child());
parentList.add(new Child());
//This is not allowed
List<Child>  childList=(List<Child>)parentList;//Compiler Error

//But,This is allowed
List<? super Child>  childList=parentList; //Okey

This is allowed becuase using reference of List<? super Child> gurantees that the List<Parent> will not be corrupted.

  • Its working for me.Thank you very much – Sachin HR Oct 11 '17 at 10:53
0

Credit goes to Blackcompe

If you are using the generic version of the list implementation, you don't need to cast, e.g.

ArrayList<BestTutor> list = null; 
BestTutor c = list.get(0); 

Generics is a type-safety method that tells Java nothing other than a BestTutor will go into this collection, so you can always bet that List.get() will return a BestTutor or whatever the bounded object is. BestTutor is called the bounded object. If you don't use generics the bounded object is Object., e.g.

ArrayList<Object> list; 

Although, this bounding is implicit, so it's just:

ArrayList list;

Java will check to see if computeArea has been overridden. If it has it will use that version, else it will use the inherited version. e.g.

class Parent {
    void callMe(){
        System.out.println("Parent"); 
    } 
} 
class Child {
    void callMe(){
        System.out.println("Child");
    }
} 
Child c = new Child(); 
c.callMe(); //will display Child

It would call the Parent version, which would print Parent, but we overrode the method. That's basic overriding. Java also has polymorphism:

Parent p = new Child(); 
p.callMe(); //will display Child

A reference of type Parent can refer to an instance of Child.

If you call a method of Parent that's been overridden by Child Java knows to call the Child's instance method, not the Parent's.

A little advanced, but that will really become useful in more advanced design methods, like "coding to interfaces".

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