6

I have an LDAP directory that I'm querying using Net::LDAP. This gives me a set of parent-child relationships.

It's a directory of people - and includes a 'manager' DN (which is another field within the directory).

I'm having real trouble turning this manager->person set of records into a hierarchical structure.

What I've got so far is:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use Net::LDAP;
use Data::Dumper;

my %people;

my $ldap   = Net::LDAP->new('my_ldap_server');
my $result = $ldap->bind('bind_dn');
die if $result->code;

my $search = $ldap->search(
    base   => 'ou=yaddayadda',
    scope  => 'subtree',
    filter => 'objectClass=person',
    attrs  => ['manager'],
);
foreach my $found ( $search->entries ) {
    my $mgr = $found->get_value('manager');
    my $dn  = $result->dn;
    push( @{ $people{$mgr} }, $dn );
}

What this gives me is a hash of managers and the people who work for them (using DN, which is unique).

An entry from %people looks like:

$VAR1 = { 
            'cn=Firstname Lastname,ou=OrgUnit' => [
                          'cn=Personame Lastname,ou=OrgUnit',
                          'cn=AnotherPerson NameHere,ou=OrgUnit', 
                         ],
            'cn=AnotherPerson NameHere,ou=OrgUnit' => [
                         'cn=Someone Else,ou=OrgUnit', 
                         ]
           };

But I'm having trouble with turning that parent-child mapping into a hierarchical structure.

e.g.:

'ceo' => [
             'pa' => [],
             'head_of_dept' => [ 
                       'person' => [],
                       'person_with_staff' => [ 'person3', 'person4' ]
                    ]
          ]

I'm at something of a loss for how to accomplish this. It seems it shouldn't be too hard to do, given that each person is unique within the organisation structure.

NB - in the above, I've got cn=AnotherPerson NameHere,ou=OrgUnit who has a subordinate, and I'm after making a nested mapping out of this:

e.g.:

$VAR1 = {
          'cn=Firstname Lastname,ou=OrgUnit' => [
                                                  'cn=Personame Lastname,ou=OrgUnit',
                                                  'cn=AnotherPerson NameHere,ou=OrgUnit',
                                                  [
                                                    'cn=Someone Else,ou=OrgUnit'
                                                  ]
                                                ]
        };
  • Just for reference, could you post the managers hash too? – Hunter McMillen Mar 2 '16 at 13:56
  • 1
    So manager is the parent id? – simbabque Mar 2 '16 at 14:00
  • Yes. Each employee has a DN in LDAP, and a manager DN (which references the same directory). – Sobrique Mar 2 '16 at 14:01
  • And it's a 1:N relationship? – simbabque Mar 2 '16 at 14:02
  • Yes. Each person has exactly one 'manager'. (I don't think there are any loops - that would be weird). – Sobrique Mar 2 '16 at 14:05
3

What you need is a directed graph, and I suggest using the Graph::Directed module, whose methods are documented in Graph

This program will build the graph for you, but without any data I couldn't test it beyond making sure it compiles

use strict;
use warnings 'all';
use feature 'say';

use Net::LDAP;
use Graph::Directed;
use Data::Dumper;

my $ldap   = Net::LDAP->new('my_ldap_server');
my $result = $ldap->bind('bind_dn');
die if $result->code;

my $search = $ldap->search(
    base   => 'ou=yaddayadda',
    scope  => 'subtree',
    filter => 'objectClass=person',
    attrs  => ['manager'],
);

my $g = Graph::Directed->new;

for my $found ( $search->entries ) {
    my $mgr = $found->get_value('manager');
    my $dn  = $result->dn;
    $g->add_edge($mgr, $dn);
}

say $g;

The resulting Graph::Directed object has a stringification overload so you can examine it superficially by simply printing it, but when you want to interrogate the structure further you will need to know some of the terms of graph theory. For instance, $g->source_vertices will return a list of all nodes that have descendants but no parents—in this case, a list of senior management, or $g->is_cyclic will return true if your data has any loops anywhere



Here's an example of a program that uses your brief sample data to display a hierarchical tree of nodes

use strict;
use warnings 'all';
use Graph::Directed;

my $data = {
    'cn=Firstname Lastname,ou=OrgUnit' => [
        'cn=Personame Lastname,ou=OrgUnit',
        'cn=AnotherPerson NameHere,ou=OrgUnit',
    ],
    'cn=AnotherPerson NameHere,ou=OrgUnit' =>
        [ 'cn=Someone Else,ou=OrgUnit', ]
};

my $g = Graph::Directed->new;

for my $mgr ( keys %$data ) {
    $g->add_edge($mgr, $_) for @{ $data->{$mgr} };
}

dump_tree($_) for $g->source_vertices;


sub dump_tree {
    my ($node, $level) = ( @_, 0);
    print '   ' x $level, $node, "\n";
    dump_tree($_, $level+1) for $g->successors($node);
}

output

cn=Firstname Lastname,ou=OrgUnit
   cn=AnotherPerson NameHere,ou=OrgUnit
      cn=Someone Else,ou=OrgUnit
   cn=Personame Lastname,ou=OrgUnit
  • That looks to be what I'm after, but I'm going to have to do a bit more reading to figure it out. – Sobrique Mar 2 '16 at 14:58
  • I'd like to print a tree-style org chart as my starting point. (With a view to extracting JSON -> D3) – Sobrique Mar 2 '16 at 15:08
  • 1
    With my data set - I get a lot of results for "source_vertices" and given I'm pretty sure most of my entries have a 'manager' this seems unexpected. – Sobrique Mar 2 '16 at 15:15
  • @Sobrique: You should check your raw data. It may be useful to export it as a list of manager -> worker pairs directly from the LDAP data. The nodes listed by source_vertices certainly have no parent/predecessor and you should be able to see why. A chart would probably be best written as a recursive subroutine that starts at any of the nodes in the source_vertices list and (recursively) creates a list of workers using $node->successors – Borodin Mar 2 '16 at 15:21
  • 1
    Found the problem - some genius has decided that 'GB' needs to be lower case in the manager field, but upper case in the dn. – Sobrique Mar 2 '16 at 15:54
2

@Hunter McMillen unfortunately deleted his very good but slightly off answer. Here is my attempt to augment his code by turning the relationship from underling -> boss towards boss -> underlings.

To simulate the LDAP responses, I created a simple Moose class.

package Person;
use Moose;

has name => ( is => 'ro' );
has boss => ( is => 'ro', predicate => 'has_boss' );

package main;
use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Printer;

# make a randomized list of people
my %people = map { $_->name => $_ }
    map { 
      Person->new( 
        name => $_->[0], ( $_->[1] ? ( boss => $_->[1] ) : () ) 
      ) 
    } (
      [qw( ceo )],                       [qw( head_of_dept ceo)],
      [qw( person head_of_dept)],        [qw( person_with_staff head_of_dept )],
      [qw( person3 person_with_staff )], [qw( person4 person_with_staff )],
    );

my %manages;
foreach my $p (values %people) {
    push @{ $manages{ $p->boss } }, $p->name if $p->has_boss;
}

# this part shamelessly stolen from @HunterMcMillen's deleted answer
sub build_tree {
    my ($person) = @_;

    my @subtrees;
    foreach my $managee ( @{ $manages{$person} } ) {
        push @subtrees, build_tree($managee);
    }

    return { $person => \@subtrees };
}

p build_tree 'ceo';

Here's the output.

\ {
    ceo   [
        [0] {
            head_of_dept   [
                [0] {
                    person   []
                },
                [1] {
                    person_with_staff   [
                        [0] {
                            person4   []
                        },
                        [1] {
                            person3   []
                        }
                    ]
                }
            ]
        }
    ]
}

This should be more or less what you want.

  • @HunterMcMillen I was just commenting how to change the data structure so it would work with your code when you deleted. :P – simbabque Mar 2 '16 at 14:38
  • oops, I guess I misunderstood. I was pretty sure the algorithm was correct; but got caught up in other things so I couldn't revisit it this morning – Hunter McMillen Mar 2 '16 at 15:25
  • @hunter it's correct, you just assumed the wrong original structure. :) – simbabque Mar 2 '16 at 15:26

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