1

Thanks in advance for considering this question.

Would anyone be able to advise why trimfill analysis using the "metafor" package gives very different results to the "meta" package (0.6803 [95% 0.3456 1.0151] with metafor compared to 0.3657 [95% -0.0213; 0.7526] with meta). Am I doing something wrong? Which is the more accurate or are both fine? I have provided some reducible code below.

install.packages("metafor")
install.packages("meta")
library("metafor")
library("meta")

es<-c(.5,.6,.3,.1,.4,.7,1.1,.2,.2,1,2,1.1)
se<-c(.1,.1,.2,.3,.1,.1,.2,.1,.05,0.5,.1,.1)
df<-data.frame(es,se)

trimfill(rma(yi=es,sei=se,data=df,method="DL"))
trimfill(metagen(TE=es,seTE=se,data=df))

Thanks,

P

0

In the meta package, the trim and fill method is done using a fixed-effects model, but the final analysis is done using a random-effects model. In metafor, the trim and fill method is done under the same type of model that you pass to it. Since you passed a random-effects model to it, a random-effects model is also used for the trim and fill method (and the final analysis is then also done using a random-effects model).

If you want to replicate what meta does, you have to first pass a fixed-effects model to the function and then manually fit a random-effects model. Vectors yi and vi in a trim and fill object contain the original plus (in case there are any) imputed data. So, you can do this:

res <- rma(yi=es,sei=se,data=df,method="FE")
res <- trimfill(res)
rma(res$yi, res$vi, method="DL")

You will find that this yields the same results as obtained with the meta package.

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