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I have tables A and B in which A has a PRIMARY key on (X,Y) and an additional key on the column 'id'; B has a PRIMARY key on (X,Y,Z). X, Y, and Z are all the same type, for both tables; A.id is an integer.

I want to run the following query:

SELECT B.* 
FROM 
A INNER JOIN B 
USING (X,Y)
WHERE A.id = 1234

However, the EXPLAIN for this select indicates that while the primary key is used for A, it is not used for B and will search ~10M rows as a result.

+----+-------------+-------+--------+------------------+---------+---------+--------------+----------+-------------+
| id | select_type | table | type   | possible_key     | key     | key_len | ref          | rows     | Extra       |
+----+-------------+-------+--------+------------------+---------+---------+--------------+----------+-------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | B     | ALL    | PRIMARY          | NULL    | NULL    | NULL         | 10659636 |             | 
|  1 | SIMPLE      | A     | eq_ref | PRIMARY,id       | PRIMARY | 8       | db.A.X,db.A.Y|        1 | Using where | 
+----+-------------+-------+--------+------------------+---------+---------+--------------+----------+-------------+

How can I optimize this query to make use of the primary keys for both A and B?

  • 1
    Try a composite index on B(x,y) – krokodilko Mar 2 '16 at 23:27
  • 1
    @kordirko If the primary on B is (X,Y,Z) then braymp already has a composite index of (X,Y) as part of that primary key. – Willem Renzema Mar 3 '16 at 1:26
  • About what percentage of A rows have id=1234? – Rick James Mar 5 '16 at 18:48
  • Please provide SHOW CREATE TABLE for both tables; the may be subtle thing (datatypes, Engines, etc) that are adding to the problem. – Rick James Mar 5 '16 at 18:49
  • If your version has it, please provide EXPLAIN FORMAT=JSON SELECT ... – Rick James Mar 5 '16 at 18:51

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