62

Hi i have the following:

bash_script parm1 a b c d ..n

I want to iterate and print all the values in the command line starting from a, not from parm1

1

5 Answers 5

154

You can "slice" arrays in bash; instead of using shift, you might use

for i in "${@:2}"
do
    echo "$i"
done

$@ is an array of all the command line arguments, ${@:2} is the same array less the first element. The double-quotes ensure correct whitespace handling.

3
  • 3
    Be careful, as slicing may cause problems with whitespace in e.g. globbed paths. The file folder/my file will be split to folder/my and file if invoked as ./script.sh folder/*. The accepted answer using shift and $1 works as intended in this case.
    – jkgeyti
    Jan 8, 2015 at 9:50
  • 7
    @jkgeyti This isn't a problem with globbed paths, just a problem with whitespace handling. Properly quoting like for i in "${@:2}"; do echo "$i"; done fixes that issue.
    – Erik
    Feb 5, 2016 at 19:25
  • Could someone edit the quotes into the answer? I'd have almost missed the comment that fixes the whitespace issue.
    – wrtlprnft
    Oct 25, 2017 at 12:00
29

This should do it:

#ignore first parm1
shift

# iterate
while test ${#} -gt 0
do
  echo $1
  shift
done
3
  • ecelletn thanx :) what does -gt do ? Sorry I know to lazy to google
    – piet
    Aug 26, 2010 at 14:04
  • greater than. just a comparison operator for test :-)
    – Scharron
    Aug 26, 2010 at 14:14
  • 1
    Wow, that's pretty lazy. Try help test which is only 9 characters and a <return>. Good luck.
    – msw
    Aug 26, 2010 at 14:15
10

Another flavor, a bit shorter that keeps the arguments list

shift
for i in "$@"
do
  echo $i
done
1
  • (You might also change echo $i to echo "$i" -- that way ./yourscript '*' actually prints *, not a list of files; it also means that ./yourscript $'argument\twith\ttabs' actually prints tabs, instead of having them changed to spaces). Sep 1, 2017 at 11:53
9

This method will keep the first param, in case you want to use it later

#!/bin/bash

for ((i=2;i<=$#;i++))
do
  echo ${!i}
done

or

for i in ${*:2} #or use $@
do
  echo $i
done
2
  • 1
    @logicor, it's an indirect expansion -- it looks up the value of the variable whose name is in the variable i. Aug 30, 2017 at 17:41
  • BTW, "${@:2}" is certainly more correct than ${*:2}. Describing them as alternatives is rather off-the-mark. Aug 30, 2017 at 18:15
7

You can use an implicit iteration for the positional parameters:

shift
for arg
do
    something_with $arg
done

As you can see, you don't have to include "$@" in the for statement.

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