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I have two questions to ask;

The first is that I am needing to know what the importance is of signing a java project's artifacts with "GnuPG".

My current situation is that I am looking into releasing my first public java project. I am using Maven to build and manage the project, and came across the "Maven-GPG-Plugin". The documentation on the plugin is extremely vague and does not describe why one should sign artifacts with "GnuPG". I have no experience with GnuPG/Maven-GPG, so I am wondering what the benefit is of using this maven plugin?

The second question I have is how would I go about using this plugin on my java project in Eclipse?

Would just adding the following to my pom.xml sign the project for me when I build it?

<build>
<plugins>
  <plugin>
    <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
    <artifactId>maven-gpg-plugin</artifactId>
    <executions>
      <execution>
        <id>sign-artifacts</id>
        <phase>verify</phase>
        <goals>
          <goal>sign</goal>
        </goals>
      </execution>
    </executions>
  </plugin>
</plugins>
</build>

If not, how would I go about properly signing the project with maven in Eclipse?

Thank you!

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I have no experience in actually using GnuPG with Maven (I have never released Maven-plugins), thus I'll limit my answer to the first part of your question.

The documentation on the plugin is extremely vague and does not describe why one should sign artifacts with "GnuPG". I have no experience with GnuPG/Maven-GPG, so I am wondering what the benefit is of using this maven plugin?

Simple hash sums that can only be used to realize accidental transmission problems like bit flips. Unlike those, GnuPG issues cryptographic signatures, which also are capable of recognizing transmission issues, but additionally enables you to verify the author of the signed data.

Without cryptographic signatures, there is no way to know whether the code/program you're downloading and executing is actually the one you're expecting. Missing or unverified cryptographic signatures again and again result in downloads with backdoors, just recently Linux Mint had such an issue.

Cryptographic signatures do not mean the code is correct and has no (security) issues, but at least know you have the same code the author published, which reduces chances of backdoors significantly.

  • Thanks. Do you know of anywhere a person new to this, such as myself, could learn about creating these "online repositories" of my project that require the project to be signed? I have found information on how to now generate my gpg key and add it to a public server, but how would I go about uploading my project to a repository? (These two may not have anything in common, but I've seen that "maven central repositories" or w/e require gpg keys for the project). – C_Neth Mar 3 '16 at 3:22
  • Also, if you wouldnt mind answering this; Can't someone just steal the key of my project? How is it secure? I can't find any information no matter what I google on how this actually works and secures my project. Also, would a hacker need to have my information that is required to upload my project in order to even create a "back door" to my project, or could a "back door" be created if someone were to re-upload my work and pretend as if I were to upload it? If you could just tell/lead/link me to this information I would be extremely appreciative. I've been looking all day with no luck. Thanks! – C_Neth Mar 3 '16 at 3:26
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    Read about public/private key cryptography to get a grasp why you only need to publish your public key, and can (and have to!) keep the private key secret. An attacker still would have to find a way to distribute the backdoored release, but this might be because of leaked credentials, security issues on the server, ... – Jens Erat Mar 3 '16 at 12:57

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