I'm gonna need to upload a potentially large csv file into my application. Each section of that file is indicated by a #TYPE *. How should I go about splitting it into chunks and doing further processing on each chunk? Each chunk is a list of headers followed by all the values.

Right now I have written the processing for a single chunk but I'm not sure how to do the operation for each chunk. I think that a regex operation would be the best option because of the constant return of #TYPE *.

#TYPE Lorem.Text.A
...
#TYPE Lorem.Text.B
...
#TYPE Lorem.Text.C
...

UPDATE

This solution has been changed from saving all sections in one file to saving all sections to separate files and zipping them into a zip file. This zip file is read by python and further analyzed. If someone would be interested in that explanation message me and I'll update this question.

Answer from @Padraic was the most helpful for the old course.

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could use a groupby presuming the sections are delimited by lines starting with #TYPE:

from itertools import groupby, chain


def get_sections(fle):
    with open(fle) as f:
        grps = groupby(f, key=lambda x: x.lstrip().startswith("#TYPE"))
        for k, v in grps:
            if k:
                yield chain([next(v)], (next(grps)[1]))  # all lines up to next #TYPE

You can get each section as you iterate:

In [13]: cat in.txt
#TYPE Lorem.Text.A
first
#TYPE Lorem.Text.B
second
#TYPE Lorem.Text.C
third

In [14]: for sec in get_sections("in.txt"):
   ....:     print(list(sec))
   ....:     
['#TYPE Lorem.Text.A\n', 'first\n']
['#TYPE Lorem.Text.B\n', 'second\n']
['#TYPE Lorem.Text.C\n', 'third\n']

If no other lines start with # then that alone will be enough to use in startswith, there is nothing complicated in your pattern so it is not really a use case for a regex. This also only stores a section at a time not the whole file into memory.

If you have no leading whitespace and the only place # appears is before TYPE it may be sufficient to just call groupby:

from itertools import groupby, chain


def get_sections(fle):
    with open(fle) as f:
        grps = groupby(f)
        for k, v in grps:
            if k:
                yield chain([next(v)], (next(grps)[1]))  # all lines up to next #TYPE

If there was some metadata at the start you could use dropwhile to skip lines until we hit the #Type and then just group:

from itertools import groupby, chain, dropwhile


def get_sections(fle):
    with open(fle) as f:
        grps = groupby(dropwhile(lambda x: not x.startswith("#"), f))
        for k, v in grps:
            if k:
                yield chain([next(v)], (next(grps)[1]))  # all lines up to next #TYPE

Demo:

In [16]: cat in.txt
meta
more meta
#TYPE Lorem.Text.A
first
#TYPE Lorem.Text.B
second
second
#TYPE Lorem.Text.C
third

In [17]: for sec in get_sections("in.txt"):
            print(list(sec))
   ....:     
['#TYPE Lorem.Text.A\n', 'first\n']
['#TYPE Lorem.Text.B\n', 'second\n', 'second\n']
['#TYPE Lorem.Text.C\n', 'third\n']
  • I'm gonna check your suggestion out. – Adrian Z. Mar 3 '16 at 13:44
  • @AdrianZ.. it will definitely work and avoid storing multiple copies of the data in memory, if you use .read with re.split you will be storing two full copies of the data in memory which if your files are large might not be possible – Padraic Cunningham Mar 3 '16 at 13:57
  • It looks really good and I like the idea of not wasting memory. Right now I'm getting no output from the print but I'll keep testing for a bit and will return with my result. – Adrian Z. Mar 3 '16 at 14:01
  • @AdrianZ. I edited the code since your firs comment so make sure you are using the latest. – Padraic Cunningham Mar 3 '16 at 14:02
  • For some reason I can't use @ for your name. I'm probably doing something wrong but both examples seem to be doing something different. Example with groupby(f) separates each row and the groupby with lamba seems to leave out the second section/chunk. – Adrian Z. Mar 3 '16 at 14:12

Do splitting according to the new line char exists before #TYPE

chunks = re.split(r'\n(?=#TYPE\b *)', f.read())

Example:

>>> import re
>>> s = '''#TYPE Lorem.Text.A
...
#TYPE Lorem.Text.B
...
#TYPE Lorem.Text.C
...'''
>>> re.split(r'\n(?=#TYPE *)', s)
['#TYPE Lorem.Text.A\n...', '#TYPE Lorem.Text.B\n...', '#TYPE Lorem.Text.C\n...']
>>> 
  • Shouldn't you start with ^ instead of \n? I believe your solution wouldn't work if the first line matches. – zondo Mar 3 '16 at 13:38
  • @zondo did you want the first line to be splitted as ['', '#TYPE'] ? And also it's not necessary to use ^ – Avinash Raj Mar 3 '16 at 13:41
  • It looks good in my test case. Just a bit messy but that's fine. I'm also gonna test the other answer. I'm curious which one is gonna have the least impact on performance. – Adrian Z. Mar 3 '16 at 13:44

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