3

I'm trying to check if my API is available within a unit test, to be sure that it responds with 200.

Now, my problem is that I'm not really sure when to use Local Test and when I have to use Android Instrumentation Tests. I know that I have to use Instrumented Tests for UI testing but how to test the endpoint?

I use Retrofit2 for communication. And tried to test Endpoint in 2 ways with Local Tests.

Example 1 (synchronous, does not work)

public class EndpointTest {

    EndpointApi api;
    SimpleInjection simpleInjection;

    @Before
    public void setUp() {
        simpleInjection = new SimpleInjection();
        api = simpleInjection.getEndpointApi();
    }

    @Test
    public void endpoint_1_isAvailable() {
        Call<ApiResponse> rootCall = api.getRoot();
        try {
            int reponseCode = rootCall.execute().code();
            Assert.assertEquals(200, reponseCode);

        } catch (IOException e) {
            Assert.fail();
        }
    }         
}

Example 2 (asynchronous, does work)

public class EndpointTest {

    EndpointApi api;
    SimpleInjection simpleInjection;

    @Before
    public void setUp() {
        simpleInjection = new SimpleInjection();
        api = simpleInjection.getEndpointApi();
    }

    @Test
    public void endpoint_2_isAvailable() {
    Call<ApiResponse> rootCall = api.getRoot();

        rootCall.enqueue(new Callback<ApiResponse>() {
            @Override
            public void onResponse(Call<ApiResponse> call, Response<ApiResponse> response) {
                Assert.assertEquals(200, response.code());
            }

            @Override
            public void onFailure(Call<ApiResponse> call, Throwable t) {
                Assert.fail();
            }
        });
    }         
}

Do I have to use Android Instrumentation Test for asynchronous mode?

2
  • 1
    you have got synchronous and asynchronous titles mixed up, from the code example 1 looks synchrnous while example 2 looks async – Bhargav Mar 3 '16 at 16:23
  • Yes, that's true. Already corrected. Thanks – shadox Mar 3 '16 at 16:57
1

The decision of whether to run your tests on a local JVM on your development machine or on an Android device/emulator is not based on whether your code is synchronous or not. Usually you would only want to run unit tests locally, as it's a lot faster and allows you to use TDD. Your tests do network requests, so they're not unit tests per say, since they have the dependency on the server - they are integration tests. It's preferable to run integration tests on an Android device to get better feedback.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.