I have a few questions about HPC. I have a code with serial and parallel sections. Parallel sections work on different chunks of memory and at some point they communicate with each other. For this I used MPI on our cluster. SLURM is the resource manager. Below is the specifications of a node in a cluster.

Specifications of a node:

Processor: 2x Intel Xeon E5-2690 (totally 16 cores 32 thread)
Memory : 256 GB 1600MHz ECC
Disk  : 2 x 600 GB 2.5" SAS (configured with raid 1)

Questions:

1) Do all cores on a node share the same memory (RAM)? If yes, do all of cores access memory at the same speed?

2) Consider a case:

--nodes = 1
--ntasks-per-node = 1
--cpus-per-task = 16 (all cores on a node)

If all cores share the same memory (depends on answer to question 1) will all cores be used or 15 of them sleep since OpenMP (for shared memory) is not used?

3) If required memory is less total memory of a node, isn't it much better to use a single node, use OpenMP to achieve core-level parallelism, and avoid time loss due to communication between nodes? That is, use this

--nodes = 1
--ntasks-per-core = 1

instead of this:

--nodes = 16
--ntasks-per-node = 1

Rest of the questions are related to statements in this link.

Use core allocation if your application is CPU bound; the more processors you can throw at it the better!

Does this statement mean that --ntasks-per-core is good when cores don't access RAM too often?

Use socket allocation if memory access is what bottlenecks your application’s performance. Since how much data can come in from memory is what limits the speed of the job, running more tasks on the same memory bus won’t result in speed-up since all of those tasks are fighting over the path to memory.

I just don't get this. What I know is all sockets and cores on sockets share the same memory. This is why I don't get why --ntasks-per-socket option is available?

Use node allocation if some node-wide resource is what bottlenecks your application. This is the case with applications that are relying heavily on access to disk or to networks resources. Running multiple tasks per node won’t result in a speed-up since all of those tasks are waiting for access to the same disk or network pipe.

Does this mean that, if memory required is more than total RAM of a single node then its better to use multiple nodes?

In order:

  1. Yes, all cores share the same memory. But not usually at the same speed. Usually, each Processor (in your configuration, you have 2 processors or sockets) has memory that is 'closer' to it. Usually the Linux kernel will attempt to allocate memory on nearby memory. This is not something that a user application usually has to worry about.
  2. If it is a serial job, then yes, 15 cores will sit idle. If your job uses MPI, then it can use the other cores on the same node. Actually, MPI on the same node usually much faster than MPI stretched across multiple nodes.
  3. You can use OpenMP or MPI on a single node. I'm not sure about the speed difference, but if you are already familiar with MPI, I would just stick with that. The difference probably isn't that big. But, the difference between running MPI on a single node vs. multiple nodes is going to be large. Running MPI on a single node will be significantly faster than across multiple nodes.

Use core allocation if your application is CPU bound; the more processors you can throw at it the better!

This is likely targeting OpenMP or single node parallel jobs.

Use socket allocation if memory access is what bottlenecks your application’s performance. Since how much data can come in from memory is what limits the speed of the job, running more tasks on the same memory bus won’t result in speed-up since all of those tasks are fighting over the path to memory.

See the answer to 1. Though it is the same memory, cores usually have separate bus's to memory.

Use node allocation if some node-wide resource is what bottlenecks your application. This is the case with applications that are relying heavily on access to disk or to networks resources. Running multiple tasks per node won’t result in a speed-up since all of those tasks are waiting for access to the same disk or network pipe.

If you need more RAM than a single node can provide, then you have no choice but to divide your program and use MPI.

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