40

This code is giving me incomplete type error. What is the problem? Isn't allowed for a class to have static member instances of itself? Is there a way to achieve the same result?

struct Size
{
    const unsigned int width;
    const unsigned int height;

    static constexpr Size big = { 480, 240 };

    static constexpr Size small = { 210, 170 };

private:

    Size( ) = default;
};
  • 4
    Are you asking specifically about constexpr static members ? – Piotr Skotnicki Mar 3 '16 at 18:37
  • @PiotrSkotnicki Yes. Removing the keyword does'n make it work anyway. – nyarlathotep108 Mar 3 '16 at 18:38
  • 1
    Once you remove the keyword, you can initialize it ouside the class I guess, when it's already a complete type – Piotr Skotnicki Mar 3 '16 at 18:39
39

Is there a way to achieve the same result?

By "the same result", do you specifically intend the constexpr-ness of Size::big and Size::small? In that case maybe this would be close enough:

struct Size
{
    const unsigned int width = 0;
    const unsigned int height = 0;

    static constexpr Size big() {
        return Size { 480, 240 };
    }

    static constexpr Size small() {
        return Size { 210, 170 };
    }

private:

    constexpr Size() = default;
    constexpr Size(int w, int h )
    : width(w),height(h){}
};

static_assert(Size::big().width == 480,"");
static_assert(Size::small().height == 170,"");
59

A class is allowed to have a static member of the same type. However, a class is incomplete until the end of its definition, and an object cannot be defined with incomplete type. You can declare an object with incomplete type, and define it later where it is complete (outside the class).

struct Size
{
    const unsigned int width;
    const unsigned int height;

    static const Size big;
    static const Size small;

private:

    Size( ) = default;
};

const Size Size::big = { 480, 240 };
const Size Size::small = { 210, 170 };

see this here: http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/f43395e5d08a3952

This doesn't work for constexpr members, however.

  • 1
    Do you think this does not work for constexpr members because forbidden by the standard or because of a compiler bug? – nyarlathotep108 Mar 4 '16 at 9:40
  • 7
    @nyarlathotep108 It doesn't work because a static constexpr member is required to be initialized inline. – Brian Mar 4 '16 at 18:10
  • What about this approach? – xskxzr Jun 25 '18 at 14:15
-1

As a workaround you can use a separate base class which definition is complete when defining the constants in the derived class.

struct size_impl
{
//data members and functions here
    unsigned int width;
    unsigned int height;
};


struct size:  public size_impl
{
//create the constants as instantiations of size_impl
    static constexpr size_impl big{480,240};
    static constexpr size_impl small{210,170};

//provide implicit conversion constructor and assignment operator
    constexpr size(const size_impl& s):size_impl(s){}
    using size_impl::operator=;

//put all other constructors here
};

//test:
constexpr size a = size::big;

You can put the base class in a separate namespace to hide its definition if you want to.

The code compiles with clang and gcc

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