23

Consider the following code (React JS code):

  poll() {
    var self   = this;
    var url    = "//" + location.hostname + "/api/v1/eve/history/historical-data/" + this.state.itemId + '/' + this.state.regionId + '/40';

    $.get(url, function(result) {
      console.log(result.data, result.data.reverse());
      self.setState({
        error:          null,
        historicalData: result.data.reverse(),
        isLoading: false
      });
    }).fail(function(response) {
      self.setState({
        error: 'Could not fetch average price data. Looks like something went wrong.',
      });
    });
  }

Notice the console.log. Lets see an image:

enter image description here

Last I checked, reverse should have reversed the order of the array. Yet it doesn't.

Am I Using this wrong (official MDN Docs)? Why isn't reverse working?

6
  • 3
    From the MDN docs: "The reverse() method reverses an array in place." (emphasis not mine)
    – JLRishe
    Commented Mar 3, 2016 at 19:00
  • I tried this thinking I could do: result.data.reverse() then just console.log() result.data. Alas it is not reversed
    – TheWebs
    Commented Mar 3, 2016 at 19:17
  • No, it is reversed. The console in whatever browser you're using shows objects in their current state, so result.data.reverse(); console.log(result.data); will give you exactly the same output as console.log(result.data); result.data.reverse();
    – JLRishe
    Commented Mar 3, 2016 at 19:47
  • 1
    But this doesn't help me at all because when the data is placed into charts the labels read from today to yesterday when if it was reversed they would read yesterday to today
    – TheWebs
    Commented Mar 3, 2016 at 19:49
  • Your code above calls result.data.reverse() twice. This means that when your array is shown, it will be in its original order. Have you tried using code that only calls result.data.reverse() once?
    – JLRishe
    Commented Mar 3, 2016 at 20:05

6 Answers 6

18

It has reversed it, the reverse() is executed before the console.log(). It mutates the actual array first in place returning a reference so then when it is logged, a is also reversed.

var a = [1,2,3,4];
console.log(a, a.reverse());
// [4, 3, 2, 1] [4, 3, 2, 1]

Everything inside the console.log parens is evaluated first. Try 2 reverses, can you guess what happens, it goes back to original order, like in your example.

var a = [1,2,3,4]
console.log(a, a.reverse());
// [4, 3, 2, 1] 
3
  • 3
    So I did: var reversedData = result.data.reverse(); console.log(reversedData); Still the array is not reversed. it shows the exact same as before. Some one suggested its because i call reverse else where, but never the less this piece of code does not reverse the array. I am unsure why.
    – TheWebs
    Commented Mar 3, 2016 at 19:13
  • In your example you call result.data.reverse() twice. So it's going back to original order. Commented Mar 3, 2016 at 19:16
  • @KyleAdams Your screenshot is already showing the array in reversed order. Remove all calls to result.data.reverse() and log result.data to the console, and I think you will see it in its original order.
    – JLRishe
    Commented Mar 3, 2016 at 19:46
11

reverse is destructive -- it changes the original array.

MDN Docs Array Reverse

example -

let a = [1,2,3,4]
console.log(a, a.reverse()) // [4,3,2,1],[4,3,2,1] 

It mutates the actual array first in place returning a reference

Solution

let a = [1,2,3,4]
let reverseArray = [...a].reverse()
console.log(a, reverseArray) // [1,2,3,4], [4,3,2,1]
3
  • If I'm not mistaken, you need to call reverse on the second line of your solution. let reverseArray = [...a].reverse(); Otherwise you get two identical copies of the original array [1,2,3,4]. Commented Apr 18, 2021 at 18:21
  • Thanks, @Eduardo06sp for the corrections Commented Sep 30, 2021 at 4:33
  • In React, my state getter is an array so [...arrayValue] to remove the reference worked
    – Zac
    Commented Oct 1, 2022 at 18:49
6

As described at https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/reverse, reverse() reverses the order of an array in place, so the array is reversed after it's been called. You're calling it twice, resulting in the array being restored to its original order. Try this:

poll() {
    var self   = this;
    var url    = "//" + location.hostname + "/api/v1/eve/history/historical-data/" + this.state.itemId + '/' + this.state.regionId + '/40';

    $.get(url, function(result) {
        result.data.reverse();
        console.log(result.data, result);
        self.setState({
            error:          null,
            historicalData: result,
            isLoading: false
        });
    }).fail(function(response) {
        self.setState({
            error: 'Could not fetch average price data. Looks like something went wrong.',
    });
}
2
  • No you do not understand. I am calling it once. Yes twice. But look at the console log. The console log is the first time. even if i remove the console.log, the array is NOT reversed.
    – TheWebs
    Commented Mar 3, 2016 at 19:10
  • Have you understood Matt Harrison's answer? The console is logging the array in reverse order twice, because it's evaluating the reverse() call before logging. Commented Mar 3, 2016 at 19:46
6

The source of your problem is that you don't understand how your browser's console works.

Many browsers have consoles that display objects in the state they are in when you expand them in the console or when you open the console, even if they change after console.log() is called. So if you do:

console.log(result.data);
result.data.reverse();
console.log(result.data);

you will see the same output twice. The second line reverses the array in place, so both log outputs are showing the same array, in its present state.

To demonstrate this console behavior, you can do the following:

var b = { a: [1, 2, 3] };
console.log(b);
b.a[1] = 9;
console.log(b);

what you will see is that b.a is [1, 9, 3] in both console outputs.

3

Initially your array was mutated thus causing it to appear normally. With below solution it mutates the array twice thus reverses the actual array to get the expected result.

Solution: [...result.data].reverse()

0

if you have a sortable property within your array of objects, 'sort' will do the rearranging after pushing an item in items

say,

let items = [{id: 1, color: 'blue'}, {id: 2, color: 'red'}];
let item = {id: 10, color: 'green'};
items.push(item);

items.sort((a, b)=>{
    return b.id - a.id  //this will sort according to .id descending
});

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