54

I have a byte array, with a fixed length of 4.

token := make([]byte, 4)

I need to set each byte to a random byte. How can I do so, in the most efficient matter? The math/rand methods do not provide a Random Byte function, as far as I am concerned.

Perhaps there is a built-in way, or should I go with generating a random string and converting it to a byte array?

1
  • 1
    1. You have a byte slice (not an array). 2. Don't worry about efficiency until needed. 3.) Consider crypto/rand instead of math/rand (or seed math/rand from crypto/rand occasionally). 4) io.ReadFull is handy.
    – Volker
    Mar 4, 2016 at 7:40

4 Answers 4

69

Package rand

import "math/rand" 

func Read

func Read(p []byte) (n int, err error)

Read generates len(p) random bytes from the default Source and writes them into p. It always returns len(p) and a nil error.

func (*Rand) Read

func (r *Rand) Read(p []byte) (n int, err error)

Read generates len(p) random bytes and writes them into p. It always returns len(p) and a nil error.

For example,

package main

import (
    "math/rand"
    "fmt"
)

func main() {
    token := make([]byte, 4)
    rand.Read(token)
    fmt.Println(token)
}

Output:

[187 163 35 30]
2
  • 4
    call rand.Seed() before rand.Read, otherwise you will get the same output each run
    – QIFENG LI
    Feb 8, 2020 at 7:26
  • 1
    For newer versions of go math/rand is considered deprecated and crypto/rand should be used instead.
    – marko1777
    Sep 2, 2023 at 8:50
19

Go 1.6 added a new function to the math/rand package:

func Read(p []byte) (n int, err error)

which fills the passed byte slice with random data. Using this rand.Read():

token := make([]byte, 4)
if _, err := rand.Read(token); err != nil {
    // Handle err
}
fmt.Println(token)

rand.Read() has 2 return values: the number of "read" bytes and an (optional) error. This is to conform with the general io.Reader interface, but the documentation of rand.Read() states that (despite its signature) it will never actually return a non-nil error, so we may omit checking it, which simplifies it to this:

token := make([]byte, 4)
rand.Read(token)
fmt.Println(token)

Don't forget to call rand.Seed() to properly initialize it before you use the math/rand package, e.g.:

rand.Seed(time.Now().UnixNano())

Note: Prior to Go 1.6 there was no math/rand.Read() function, but there was (and still is) a crypto/rand.Read() function, but the crypto/rand package implements a cryptographically secure pseudorandom number generator, so it is much slower than math/rand.

2
  • 2
    rand.Read always returns nil error, so there's no need to handle it - even if it's a respectable habit... :) Mar 3, 2016 at 19:52
  • @Aedolon Yeah, just added that.
    – icza
    Mar 3, 2016 at 20:02
16

Using math.Rand means that you are using the system CSPRNG that your operating system provides. This means using /dev/urandom/ and Windows’ CryptGenRandom API. Go’s crypto/rand package, thankfully, abstracts these implementation details away to minimise the risk of getting it wrong.

import(
   "crypto/rand"
   "encoding/base64"
 )

// GenerateRandomBytes returns securely generated random bytes. 
// It will return an error if the system's secure random
// number generator fails to function correctly, in which
// case the caller should not continue.
func GenerateRandomBytes(n int) ([]byte, error) {
     b := make([]byte, n)
    _, err := rand.Read(b)
    // Note that err == nil only if we read len(b) bytes.
    if err != nil {
       return nil, err
   }

   return b, nil
}
1
  • I don't think it's correct that math.rand is using a cryptographically secure PRNG. pkg.go.dev/math/rand says package rand implements pseudo-random number generators unsuitable for security-sensitive work.
    – poolie
    Apr 22, 2023 at 22:31
2

For newer versions of go math/rand is considered deprecated and crypto/rand should be used instead. Cited from it's doc: rand.Read is deprecated: For almost all use cases, crypto/rand.Read is more appropriate

package main

import (
    "crypto/rand"
    "fmt"
)

func main() {
    token := make([]byte, 4)
    rand.Read(token)
    fmt.Println(token)
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.