20

Currently running with:

l1 = [i for i in range(0,10)]
l2 = [i for i in range(0,10)]
l3 = [i for i in range(0,10)]
lists = [l1, l2, l3]
length = len(lists[0])
for l in lists:
    if length != len(l):
        raise ValueErrorr('not all lists have same length!')

Is there a prettier way to test for this than a for loop? Is there a faster/better way which isn't O(n) ?

2
  • Faster/better way could be if you count the difference in the range value after the first list is formed and use that count as a pre-condition before creating the other lists. That way, you avoid the for loop and O(n) solution as you are not even creating the other lists if difference in range of other lists exceeds the difference in range of first list.
    – YBathia
    Commented Mar 4, 2016 at 8:24
  • related: check if all elements in a list are identical
    – jfs
    Commented Mar 4, 2016 at 15:49

5 Answers 5

26

I'd do it with a generator expression and all:

it = iter(lists)
the_len = len(next(it))
if not all(len(l) == the_len for l in it):
     raise ValueError('not all lists have same length!')

This avoids checking the length of the first list twice and does not build throwaway list/set datastructures.

all also evaluates lazily, which means it will stop and return False as soon as the first list which differs in length is yielded by the generator.

1
  • 1
    add if not lists: return True
    – jfs
    Commented Mar 4, 2016 at 15:52
11

You can use a set comprehension in order to preserve the unique lengths, then check if you only have one item in set:

if len({len(i) for i in lists}) == 1:
    # do stuff

Or as a more efficient way you could use a generator expression within any or all.

def check_size_eq(lst):
    # returns true if there's any list with unequal length to the first one
    return not any(len(lst[0])!= len(i) for i in lst)
    # or you could do:
    # return all(len(lst[0])== len(i) for i in lst)

demo :

>>> a = {1}
>>> 
>>> a.pop() and not a
True
>>> a = {1,3}
>>> a.pop() and not a
False
5
  • 1
    The first one looks pretty sleek, but wouldn't it always loop through the entire list?
    – deepbrook
    Commented Mar 4, 2016 at 8:26
  • @j4ck Yes the first one is more pythonic. But what you mean by wouldn't it always loop through the entire list? I think that's what it's supposed to do.
    – Mazdak
    Commented Mar 4, 2016 at 8:29
  • 3
    I mean that it wouldn't exit on first len() being different, right? Hence, worst and best-case are O(n)?
    – deepbrook
    Commented Mar 4, 2016 at 8:31
  • 1
    @j4ck Ah, yeah, from an algorithmic perspective you are absolutely right. In that case the timgeb's answer is the best (or maybe implementing that using any())
    – Mazdak
    Commented Mar 4, 2016 at 8:33
  • Cheers for clearing that up :)
    – deepbrook
    Commented Mar 4, 2016 at 8:36
6

You can use the map function to get the length of your lists (in python3, this will be an iterator)

lengths = map(len,lists)

Then you can apply the set function to this to turn it into a set of the unique values. If there is only one value, then they are of the same length.

if len(set(map(len,lists)))==1:
    print("All are the same length")
else:
    print("They are not the same length!")
4

First of all, your solution is not O(logn). And there can't be a logarithmic algorithm. You'll have to check each item at least once, so O(n) is the optimal complexity.

#  import imap from itertools on Py2


if len(set(map(len, lists))) not in (0, 1):
    raise ValueErrorr('not all lists have same length!')
5
  • You're right, it isnt - I meant O(n); fixed that.
    – deepbrook
    Commented Mar 4, 2016 at 8:22
  • Same Question to you - wouldn't that always force it to loop through the entire list? I understand mine has the worst-case scenario being O(n), but isn't yours also best-case O(n)?
    – deepbrook
    Commented Mar 4, 2016 at 8:28
  • 1
    @j4ck yes, this does loop through the entire array. Use all if you want to break early (though that is still O(n) with a smaller constant). Commented Mar 4, 2016 at 8:35
  • use <= 1 instead of != 1. No lists (len(lists) == 0) means that there are no lists with diffferent lengths.
    – jfs
    Commented Mar 4, 2016 at 15:48
  • @J.F.Sebastian nice detail, thank you. Commented Mar 4, 2016 at 16:39
1

Defining 'prettier way' is in the eyes of the beholder, this one is sleek but not clear to understand as python code should be.

lists_are_length_equaled = False not in [len(i) == len(lists[0]) for i in lists]

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