7

I tried to use std::shared_pointer with deleter. I tried to use a member function as the deleter. However it could not compiled. Compiler gave me a error message but I could not understand why it did not work. Does someone knows why it did not work? Thank you very much.

Simplified code is following,

#include <memory>

class MemberFunctionPointerInConstructor {
public:
    MemberFunctionPointerInConstructor(void) {
        std::shared_ptr<int> a = std::shared_ptr<int>(new int(1), deleter);  // this line makes a compiler error message
    }

    void deleter(int* value) {
        delete value;
    }
};

The error message from compiler is following,

error: invalid use of non-static member function
std::shared_ptr<int> a = std::shared_ptr<int>(new int(1), deleter);
                                                                 ^

Thank you very much.

4 Answers 4

8

To use a member function that isn't bound to an instance of your class you'd have to declare the method static

static void deleter(int* value) {
    delete value;
}
2
  • Lovely simple answer. :)
    – erip
    Mar 4, 2016 at 15:24
  • Thank you CoryKramer for an focused answer.
    – mora
    Mar 5, 2016 at 1:13
3

If you want to use a non-static member function as a deleter, you have to bind it to an instance—but note that the instance would need to still be alive when the deleter is invoked. For example,

class ShorterName {
public:
    ShorterName(void) {
        using namespace std::placeholders;
        auto a = std::shared_ptr<int>(new int(1),
                   std::bind(&A::deleter, this, _1));
    }

    void deleter(int* value) {
        delete value;
    }
};

If you don't need a particular instance, you can make the function static, so it doesn't require an instance.

class ShorterName {
public:
    ShorterName(void) {
        auto a = std::shared_ptr<int>(new int(1), deleter);
    }

    static void deleter(int* value) {
        delete value;
    }
};
0
3

There are several ways to solve this. If you actually mean a non-static member function, one way of doing so (not the only one) would be through a lambda function:

class MemberFunctionPointerInConstructor {
public:
    MemberFunctionPointerInConstructor() {
        std::shared_ptr<int> a = std::shared_ptr<int>(
            new int(1), 
            [this](int *p){this->deleter(p);});  
    }   

    void deleter(int* value) {
        delete value;
    }   
};  
3
  • Thank you Ami Tavory again. It is the best answer for me. Let me ask you another favor. If I use lamda, does it take extra memory of pointer p in its lamda object? I am curious on memory size.
    – mora
    Mar 5, 2016 at 1:09
  • @mora Not exactly sure what you mean. The p is a placeholder - it says "when you know which p you want to delete, call this function with it". The lambda will store this, though - it needs to remember it.
    – Ami Tavory
    Mar 5, 2016 at 8:32
  • Thank you for replying. What I wanted know was sizeof(MemberFunctionPointerInConstructor). I could not think of test by sizeof(...) when I asked you. It was 1. It does not include two pointers, *this nor *p. Anyway thank you again.
    – mora
    Mar 5, 2016 at 10:00
1

The answer is very simple.

static void deleter(int* value) {
    delete value;
}

You must make the function static, because otherwise it might use member variables of that class, which can be only done if there is an instance for it to be done with, and here that is not the case.

0

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