4

I have a method on my user model to calculate the user's age and return a human readable string. My user's can be between 1 month old and above so the returned string is different depending on if the person is "2 months old" or "1 year old" or "2 years and 3 months old".

I have reviewed few SO posts to come to this solution. Is there anything I am missing? Leap years? Thank you!

def age
    dob = self.date_of_birth

    # if a date of birth is not nil
    if dob != nil 

      # get current date  
      now = Date.current

      # has person had their birthday yet this year
      had_birthday = ((now.month > dob.month || (now.month == dob.month && now.day >= dob.day)) ? true : false) 

      # if yes then subtract this year from birthday year, if not then also subtract 1 to get how many full years old they are
      years = now.year - dob.year - (had_birthday ? 0 : 1)

      # get the calendar month difference from birthdya calendar month and today's calendar month.  if they have not had their birthdya yet then subtract the difference from 12
      months = had_birthday ? now.month - dob.month : 12 - (now.month - dob.month)

      # for under 1 year olds
      if years == 0
        return months > 1 ? months.to_s + " months old" : months.to_s + " month old"  

      # for 1 year olds
      elsif years == 1
        return months > 1 ? years.to_s + " year and " + months.to_s + " months old" : years.to_s + " year and " + months.to_s + " month old" 

      # for older than 1
      else
        return months > 1 ? years.to_s + " years and " + months.to_s + " months old" : years.to_s + " years and " + months.to_s + " month old"
      end

    # No date of birth saved so can not calculate age
    else
      return "No Date of Birth"
    end
  end
  • 2
    "Is there anything missing? " this is exaclty where you want to use unit tests, even when you otherwise not using them. You can use them to ensure the right thing is happen when somebody is born at first march and today is 29 feb. To make it easier to test, make the "now/today" also a parameter. – Meier Mar 4 '16 at 18:56
5

While this may be better posted to a codereview site, I will still give you my thoughts.

You have written a fairly long method for what could be a couple smaller ones.

First, I would write one method that takes the number of years an months and separate that into its own function.

def readable_age(years, months)
  # for under 1 year olds
  if years == 0
    return months > 1 ? months.to_s + " months old" : months.to_s + " month old"  

  # for 1 year olds
  elsif years == 1
    return months > 1 ? years.to_s + " year and " + months.to_s + " months old" : years.to_s + " year and " + months.to_s + " month old" 

  # for older than 1
  else
    return months > 1 ? years.to_s + " years and " + months.to_s + " months old" : years.to_s + " years and " + months.to_s + " month old"
  end
end

Though, if you do not mind adding some dependencies to your project, you can take advantage of the actionview gem, you can take advantage of the pluralize function. Something along the lines of

def readable_age(years, months)
  year_text = ''
  if years == 0
    year_text = "#{years} #{pluralize('year', years)} and "
  end

  "#{year_text}#{pluralize('month', months)} old"
end

Now for your function to calculate the number of years and months.

def age(t)
  dob = self.date_of_birth

  months = (t.year * 12 + t.month) - (dob.year * 12 + dob.month)

  # months / 12 will give the number of years
  # months % 12 will give the number of months
  readable_age(months / 12, 15 % 12)
end

EDIT

The reason I am passing a date object into the age function is to allow you to calculate the the age of a person for a given time stamp. It also makes it easier to test a function if it produces the same result given the same inputs.

  • Thank you for all of the improvements! – MicFin Mar 4 '16 at 21:02
4

You could use time_ago_in_words:

Class.new.extend(ActionView::Helpers::DateHelper).time_ago_in_words(Time.parse("1981-11-20"))
=> "over 34 years"

Edit: it doesn't have the same granularity as your solution, I know. Just thought it might be a good reference.

1

Just another option based on the Rational class and some date calculations supported by Rails.

def age
  return 'No Date of Birth' unless date_of_birth.present?

  days_alive = Date.now - date_of_birth
  years = (days_alive / 365).to_i
  months = ((days_alive % 365) / 30).to_i
  [pluralized(years, 'year'), pluralized(months, 'month')].compact.join(' ')
end

def pluralized(quantity, noun)
  return nil if quantity.zero?
  return noun.singularize if quantity == 1
  noun.pluralize
end
  • Thanks! going to hav to get familiar with Raionali class – MicFin Mar 4 '16 at 21:03
  • While this seems like it would give a fairly close answer, I believe it fails to take leap years into consideration. – Justin Wood Mar 6 '16 at 17:19
  • With the level of precision set at months, I consider it a reasonable concession. It will mean, for example, a child born 1-Mar-2015 will be said to be "1 year" on 29-Feb-2016 and a person will be more than a century old before the age function reports the age in a truly inaccurate way. – AndyV Mar 7 '16 at 3:56
0

Using Rails helpers:

DateHelper = Class.new.extend(ActionView::Helpers::DateHelper)
DateHelper.time_ago_in_words(Time.parse("2002-02-20"))
=> "almost 15 years"

http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionView/Helpers/DateHelper.html#method-i-time_ago_in_words

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