42

I need help with Python. I'm trying to open a file, and if the file doesn't exist, I need to create it and open it for writing. I have this so far:

#open file for reading
fn = input("Enter file to open: ")
fh = open(fn,'r')
# if file does not exist, create it
if (!fh) 
fh = open ( fh, "w")

The error message says there's an issue on the line if(!fh). Can I use exist like in Perl?

32

If you don't need atomicity you can use os module:

import os

if not os.path.exists('/tmp/test'):
    os.mknod('/tmp/test')

UPDATE:

As Cory Klein mentioned, on Mac OS for using os.mknod() you need a root permissions, so if you are Mac OS user, you may use open() instead of os.mknod()

import os

if not os.path.exists('/tmp/test'):
    with open('/tmp/test', 'w'): pass
31

Well, first of all, in Python there is no ! operator, that'd be not. But open would not fail silently either - it would throw an exception. And the blocks need to be indented properly - Python uses whitespace to indicate block containment.

Thus we get:

fn = input('Enter file name: ')
try:
    file = open(fn, 'r')
except IOError:
    file = open(fn, 'w')
  • I have been trying to figure out why this is preferable to open(fn, 'a').close(). Is it because the implicit seek in append may be too expensive? – kojiro Mar 28 '18 at 13:31
18
'''
w  write mode
r  read mode
a  append mode

w+  create file if it doesn't exist and open it in write mode
r+  open an existing file in read+write mode
a+  create file if it doesn't exist and open it in append mode
'''

example:

file_name = 'my_file.txt'
f = open(file_name, 'a+')  # open file in append mode
f.write('python rules')
f.close()

I hope this helps. [FYI am using python version 3.6.2]

  • 2
    r+ does not create any file. As also mentioned here and here(in the description) r+ is for opening a file in reading and writing mode. Correct it as it might confuse people :) – Stam Kaly Mar 29 '18 at 12:05
9

Using input() implies Python 3, recent Python 3 versions have made the IOError exception deprecated (it is now an alias for OSError). So assuming you are using Python 3.3 or later:

fn = input('Enter file name: ')
try:
    file = open(fn, 'r')
except FileNotFoundError:
    file = open(fn, 'w')
6

I think this should work:

#open file for reading
fn = input("Enter file to open: ")
try:
    fh = open(fn,'r')
except:
# if file does not exist, create it
    fh = open(fn,'w')

Also, you incorrectly wrote fh = open ( fh, "w") when the file you wanted open was fn

  • 5
    You are assuming that the file cannot be opened because it does not exist. It could be that you don't have read permissions, or the filename is invalid in some way. Bare except is not a good idea. – cdarke Mar 4 '16 at 23:03
  • I understand that, (now) but this will be effective enough for his level of programming, it's not like we are teaching him the etiquette of programming or prepping him for class though. – That One Random Scrub Mar 4 '16 at 23:07
  • 7
    OK, the poor guy comes from Perl so he needs all the help he can get. – cdarke Mar 4 '16 at 23:12
  • This made my day. We could explain the intricacies, but, I want to sleep, maybe I will explain pathing in the morning to him, or do you want to? – That One Random Scrub Mar 4 '16 at 23:14
1

Be warned, each time the file is opened with this method the old data in the file is destroyed regardless of 'w+' or just 'w'.

import os

with open("file.txt", 'w+') as f:
    f.write("file is opened for business")
  • 1
    There's a typo in the code. It should be with open('file.txt', 'w+') as f:. – Flux Mar 28 at 9:15
  • @Flux fixed typo – Brimstedt Mar 30 at 4:43
0

First let me mention that you probably don't want to create a file object that eventually can be opened for reading OR writing, depending on a non-reproducible condition. You need to know which methods can be used, reading or writing, which depends on what you want to do with the fileobject.

That said, you can do it as That One Random Scrub proposed, using try: ... except:. Actually that is the proposed way, according to the python motto "It's easier to ask for forgiveness than permission".

But you can also easily test for existence:

import os
# open file for reading
fn = raw_input("Enter file to open: ")
if os.path.exists(fn):
    fh = open(fn, "r")
else:
    fh = open(fn, "w")

Note: use raw_input() instead of input(), because input() will try to execute the entered text. If you accidently want to test for file "import", you'd get a SyntaxError.

  • The comments regarding input() and raw_input() only apply to Python 2. Python 3 has replaced raw_input() with input() and the "old" use of input() is gone. – cdarke Feb 1 '18 at 20:26
  • That's possible and would be/is a good improvement to make it more intuitive. – Michael S. Feb 1 '18 at 22:06
-2
fn = input("Enter file to open: ")
try:
    fh = open(fn, "r")
except:
    fh = open(fn, "w")

success

  • 5
    Please try to explain your answer to make it more useful for other people. – Samer Abu Gahgah Apr 24 at 9:29
  • 1
    This is 100% wrong as it doesn't even attempt to handle race conditions. – Henry Henrinson Jun 17 at 9:29

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