39

According to this talk there is a certain pitfall when using C++11 range base for on Qt containers. Consider:

QList<MyStruct> list;

for(const MyStruct &item : list)
{
    //...
}

The pitfall, according to the talk, comes from the implicit sharing. Under the hood the ranged-based for gets the iterator from the container. But because the container is not const the iterator will be non-const and that is apparently enough for the container to detach.

When you control the lifetime of a container this is easy to fix, one just passes the const reference to the container to force it to use const_iterator and not to detach.

QList<MyStruct> list;
const Qlist<MyStruct> &constList = list;

for(const MyStruct &item : constList)
{
    //...
}

However what about for example containers as return values.

QList<MyStruct> foo() { //... }

void main()
{
    for(const MyStruct &item : foo())
    {
    }
}

What does happen here? Is the container still copied? Intuitively I would say it is so to avoid that this might need to be done?

QList<MyStruct> foo() { //... }

main()
{ 
    for(const MyStruct &item : const_cast<const QList<MyStruct>>(foo()))
    {
    }
}

I am not sure. I know it is a bit more verbose but I need this because I use ranged based for loops heavily on huge containers a lot so the talk kind of struck the right string with me.

So far I use a helper function to convert the container to the const reference but if there is a shorter/easier way to achieve the same I would like to hear it.

13
  • 1
    Stop worrying about that. All Qt containers implements COW pattern. And in latest versions Qt team implements support of C++11, including move ctors. Mar 5, 2016 at 8:01
  • Btw, try const MyStruct& const item : foo() to iterate in const style. Mar 5, 2016 at 8:02
  • 1
    @SaZ I will try your suggestion. But regarding COW the Qt developer in the linked talk explicitly said that creating non-const iterator from a container means it detaches. It makes sense because otherwise they could not detect if you actually did use that iterator to change it, simply the fact you can is enough. Mar 5, 2016 at 8:49
  • i have literally never had a problem with just doing for(const auto& bla : blas) i dont see there could be a problem with this even
    – AngryDuck
    Mar 18, 2016 at 12:00
  • 1
    Shouldn't it be const QList<MyStruct> &constList = list; instead of Qlist<MyStruct> &constList = list; to get const iterators and prevent detach? If no, why not?
    – avb
    Nov 4, 2016 at 8:43

2 Answers 2

23

Qt has an implementation to resolve this, qAsConst (see https://doc.qt.io/qt-5/qtglobal.html#qAsConst). The documentation says that it is Qt's version of C++17's std::as_const().

3
  • 1
    When i write something like qAsConst( getStringList() ) i get compilation error call to deleted function. In the header there is // prevent rvalue arguments:\nvoid qAsConst(const T &&) = delete;
    – Youda008
    Jun 29, 2023 at 8:20
  • You probably have to store the result of the getStringList() call into a temp variable, then call qAsConst on that (or declare the temp as const directly?)
    – mBardos
    Jun 29, 2023 at 9:44
  • If i store the result to a local variable, then the compiler no longer warns about detaching a Qt container so the problem probably no longer exists. Also, as you said, i can already declare it as const. So the existence of qAsConst seems kinda pointless.
    – Youda008
    Jun 30, 2023 at 8:22
19
template<class T>
std::remove_reference_t<T> const& as_const(T&&t){return t;}

might help. An implicitly shared object returned an rvalue can implicitly detect write-shraring (and detatch) due to non-const iteration.

This gives you:

for(auto&&item : as_const(foo()))
{
}

which lets you iterate in a const way (and pretty clearly).

If you need reference lifetime extension to work, have 2 overloads:

template<class T>
T const as_const(T&&t){return std::forward<T>(t);}
template<class T>
T const& as_const(T&t){return t;}

But iterating over const rvalues and caring about it is often a design error: they are throw away copies, why does it matter if you edit them? And if you behave very differently based off const qualification, that will bite you elsewhere.

10
  • It turns out that one needs two overloads of the as_const, one taking l-value (T&) reference (as given) and the other for r-value (T&&) references (as is actually required in the example). Both have same return value and content of course. Mar 5, 2016 at 8:35
  • 2
    The reason I want it for temporaries as well is was for completeness sake on one hand and because of implicit sharing (COW) in Qt on the other. Basically making shallow copies is fast and cheap but the moment you spawn non-const iterator you perform deep copy. Qt classes often return containers by value because it is cheap. But if you iterate over them in non-const way you do the deep copy. If you don't need it it would be a waste (and sometimes significant) to do a deep copy to perform const for-range loop... But maybe I understand it wrongly. :-) Thanks a lot for the forward trick anyhow! Mar 18, 2016 at 15:07
  • 15
    Newer Qt versions will have qAsConst, see doc-snapshots.qt.io/qt5-dev/qtglobal.html#qAsConst. Mar 18, 2016 at 22:21
  • 3
    Just for completeness, std::as_const was introduced in C++17 and it is equivalent to qAsConst.
    – cbuchart
    Feb 13, 2020 at 11:28
  • 1
    as_const( foo() ) doesn't work, it is declared as void as_const(const _Tp&&) = delete;
    – Youda008
    Jun 29, 2023 at 8:26

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