99

I need a timer in Angular 2, which tick after a time interval and do some task (may be call some functions).

How to do this with Angular 2?

5
  • 2
    Include just enough code to allow others to reproduce the problem. For help with this, read How to create a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example. If it is possible to create a live example of the problem that you can link to (for example, on sqlfiddle.com or jsbin.com) then do so - but also include the code in your question itself. Not everyone can access external sites, and the links may break over time.
    – Prasad
    Mar 5, 2016 at 11:10
  • 16
    This is actually a very helpful question. Observables are important to learn and use. Even if the user didn't have code to go from this question will be helpful to others.
    – Winnemucca
    Apr 12, 2016 at 16:36
  • This comment falls in the same bucket, but neither of the previous 2 people have helped, just commented on the question... Apparently people are using setTimeout again now.
    – rbnzdave
    Aug 1, 2016 at 19:09
  • setTimeout is really old-school - checkout out the fresh TimerObservable below
    – Philip
    Sep 23, 2016 at 15:50
  • 2
    let this._timer = setInterval(() => this.getWidgetData(), 10000); and make sure to call clearInterval(this._timer); on destroy
    – crh225
    Nov 9, 2016 at 18:36

10 Answers 10

129

In Addition to all the previous answers, I would do it using RxJS Observables

please check Observable.timer

Here is a sample code, will start after 2 seconds and then ticks every second:

import {Component} from 'angular2/core';
import {Observable} from 'rxjs/Rx';

@Component({
    selector: 'my-app',
    template: 'Ticks (every second) : {{ticks}}'
})
export class AppComponent {
  ticks =0;
  ngOnInit(){
    let timer = Observable.timer(2000,1000);
    timer.subscribe(t=>this.ticks = t);
  }
}

And here is a working plunker

Update If you want to call a function declared on the AppComponent class, you can do one of the following:

** Assuming the function you want to call is named func,

ngOnInit(){
    let timer = Observable.timer(2000,1000);
    timer.subscribe(this.func);
}

The problem with the above approach is that if you call 'this' inside func, it will refer to the subscriber object instead of the AppComponent object which is probably not what you want.

However, in the below approach, you create a lambda expression and call the function func inside it. This way, the call to func is still inside the scope of AppComponent. This is the best way to do it in my opinion.

ngOnInit(){
    let timer = Observable.timer(2000,1000);
    timer.subscribe(t=> {
        this.func(t);
    });
}

check this plunker for working code.

14
  • Should I able to pass a function to ` timer.subscribe(t=>this.ticks = t);` which is call in every tick ?
    – kuntal
    Mar 6, 2016 at 14:40
  • @matrixwebtech Yes, the 't=>this.ticks = t' is a lambda expression, exactly the same as 'function(t){ this.ticks = t }' Mar 6, 2016 at 14:42
  • I try timer.subscribe(function name() { console.log("hhhhhh") }); which working but how I call a function which declared separately ngOnInit() { let timer = Observable.timer(2000,1000); timer.subscribe(function() { this.fun(); }); } fun() { console.log("hhhhhh") }
    – kuntal
    Mar 7, 2016 at 14:42
  • @matrixwebtech please check my updated answer for examples. Mar 7, 2016 at 17:17
  • 1
    @Notflip Under the hood, timer seems to use setInterval(). But, you can pass the animationFrame scheduler (which uses requestAnimationFrame()) to use it instead of the default async scheduler. All you need to do is Observable.timer(*,*,Scheduler.animationFrame), given import {Scheduler} from ‘rxjs’.Although, on timer it doesn't seem to work. It still seems to use setInterVal(). However, on other kinds of observable such as Observable.range(0,1000,Scheduler.animationFrame), the requestAnimationFrame is used for sure. performance wise, I can't answer you for sure right now. Feb 21, 2017 at 0:31
79

Another solution is to use TimerObservable

TimerObservable is a subclass of Observable.

import {Component, OnInit, OnDestroy} from '@angular/core';
import {Subscription} from "rxjs";
import {TimerObservable} from "rxjs/observable/TimerObservable";

@Component({
  selector: 'app-component',
  template: '{{tick}}',
})
export class Component implements OnInit, OnDestroy {

  private tick: string;
  private subscription: Subscription;

  constructor() {
  }

  ngOnInit() {
    let timer = TimerObservable.create(2000, 1000);
    this.subscription = timer.subscribe(t => {
      this.tick = t;
    });
  }

  ngOnDestroy() {
    this.subscription.unsubscribe();
  }
}

P.S.: Don't forget to unsubsribe.

7
  • 3
    the unsubscribe part is key
    – Tucker
    Jan 8, 2017 at 15:38
  • how do you unsubscribe? and when? Feb 20, 2017 at 15:54
  • 2
    @Notflip ngOnDestroy is called during component deinitialization: this.subscription.unsubscribe(); unsubscribes.
    – Philip
    Feb 21, 2017 at 10:06
  • How are you able to use this.subscription without referencing it above?
    – Winnemucca
    Mar 28, 2017 at 20:57
  • 2
    How do you pause and restart it?
    – Dani
    Jan 28, 2018 at 18:55
11
import {Component, View, OnInit, OnDestroy} from "angular2/core";

import { Observable, Subscription } from 'rxjs/Rx';

@Component({

})
export class NewContactComponent implements OnInit, OnDestroy {

    ticks = 0;
    private timer;
    // Subscription object
    private sub: Subscription;


    ngOnInit() {
        this.timer = Observable.timer(2000,5000);
        // subscribing to a observable returns a subscription object
        this.sub = this.timer.subscribe(t => this.tickerFunc(t));
    }
    tickerFunc(tick){
        console.log(this);
        this.ticks = tick
    }

    ngOnDestroy(){
        console.log("Destroy timer");
        // unsubscribe here
        this.sub.unsubscribe();

    }


}
1
  • 4
    This doesn't add anything that isn't already explained in other answers, or does it? May 11, 2017 at 7:10
7

With rxjs 6.2.2 and Angular 6.1.7, I was getting an:

Observable.timer is not a function

error. This was resolved by replacing Observable.timer with timer:

import { timer, Subscription } from 'rxjs';

private myTimerSub: Subscription;    

ngOnInit(){    
    const ti = timer(2000,1000);    
    this.myTimerSub = ti.subscribe(t => {    
        console.log("Tick");    
    });    
}    

ngOnDestroy() {    
    this.myTimerSub.unsubscribe();    
}
2
  • 3
    To do the unsubscribe, you have to have a subscription variable like @alexis-poo above. See: stackoverflow.com/questions/40181169/…. I base this on your answer not working as written in that regard.
    – Reid
    Oct 16, 2018 at 5:57
  • I love this guy who is always updating the Posts to the newest Angular versions... Everytime so much struggle with AngularJS and Angular. Thanks man!
    – chainstair
    Apr 2, 2019 at 22:24
4

You can simply use setInterval utility and use arrow function as callback so that this will point to the component instance.

For ex:

this.interval = setInterval( () => { 
    // call your functions like 
    this.getList();
    this.updateInfo();
});

Inside your ngOnDestroy lifecycle hook, clear the interval.

ngOnDestroy(){
    clearInterval(this.interval);
}
3

I faced a problem that I had to use a timer, but I had to display them in 2 component same time, same screen. I created the timerObservable in a service. I subscribed to the timer in both component, and what happened? It won't be synched, cause new subscription always creates its own stream.

What I would like to say, is that if you plan to use one timer at several places, always put .publishReplay(1).refCount() at the end of the Observer, cause it will publish the same stream out of it every time.

Example:

this.startDateTimer = Observable.combineLatest(this.timer, this.startDate$, (localTimer, startDate) => {
  return this.calculateTime(startDate);
}).publishReplay(1).refCount();
1
  • can you share you implementation ? Nov 20, 2017 at 8:33
1

Found a npm package that makes this easy with RxJS as a service.

https://www.npmjs.com/package/ng2-simple-timer

You can 'subscribe' to an existing timer so you don't create a bazillion timers if you're using it many times in the same component.

1

If you look to run a method on ngOnInit you could do something like this:

import this 2 libraries from RXJS:

import {Observable} from 'rxjs/Rx';
import {Subscription} from "rxjs";

Then declare timer and private subscription, example:

timer= Observable.timer(1000,1000); // 1 second for 2 seconds (2000,1000) etc
private subscription: Subscription;

Last but not least run method when timer stops

ngOnInit() {
  this.subscription = this.timer.subscribe(ticks=> {
    this.populatecombobox();  //example calling a method that populates a combobox
    this.subscription.unsubscribe();  //you need to unsubscribe or it will run infinite times
  });
}

That's all, Angular 5

0

Set Timer and auto call service after certain time

 // Initialize from ngInit
    ngOnInit(): void {this.getNotifications();}
    
    getNotifications() {
        setInterval(() => {this.getNewNotifications();
        }, 60000);  // 60000 milliseconds interval 
    }
    getNewNotifications() {
        this.notifyService.getNewNotifications().subscribe(
            data => { // call back },
            error => { },
        );
    }
0

on the newest version of Angular (I work on 12.2.*) Observable.timer is not supported. You can use it with a bit change at @Abdulrahman Alsoghayer example.

import {Component} from '@angular/core';
import {timer} from 'rxjs';

@Component({
    selector: 'my-app',
    template: 'Ticks (every second) : {{ticks}}'
})
export class AppComponent {
  ticks =0;
  ngOnInit(){
    let timer$ = timer(2000,1000);
    timer$.subscribe(t=>this.ticks = t);
  }
}

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