2

I have a class which inherits from another class, and I wish to call [index] to access the index'th element of some allocated storage.

Here is a minimal example:

class A
{
    protected:
    double *mem;

    double operator[](const size_t index)
    {
        return mem[index];
    }
}

class B : public A
{
    void function()
    {
        double var = this->operator[](0);
    }
}

So here I step around the problem by calling this->operator[](0) which is kind of messy.

Is this the correct way to access elements of mem considering that I don't have access to that variable from the derived class, or is there an alternative way?

Edit: I think it might be significant that I'm conforming to C++11, so can't call mem[0]?

Edit, template classes

As discussed below, the compiler error I see isn't showing up for this example, because there are no templates here.

To reproduce the compiler error:

template <typename T>
class A
{
    protected:
    double *mem;

    double operator[](const size_t index)
    {
        return mem[index];
    }
}

template <typename T>
class B : public A<T>
{
    void function()
    {
        double var = this->operator[](0);
    }
}

Possible Solutions

return this->operator[](0);
return (*this)[0];
return (this->mem)[0];
return *((this->mem)+0);
return (*this).mem[0];
return *((*this).mem+0);

... I think all of these do what I expect them to. Any more suggestions?

Even better solution:

return A::mem[0];

Exactly what I wanted!

6

You could say (*this)[0].

There's nothing stopping you from using mem[0] either though, in any version of C++.

  • Nothing except sanity. You shouldn't directly access base members when they're already "controlled" through a tidy interface. I'd actually make mem private as soon as possible. – Lightness Races with Monica Mar 5 '16 at 17:51
  • 1
    I think anything declared as protected is fair game. If you're not supposed to access it, it should be private. But otherwise I agree, I was just pointing it out there is no mystery rule in C++11 that would prevent you from doing that if you really wanted to. – Matti Virkkunen Mar 5 '16 at 17:52
  • mem is protected, but I cannot access it! error: 'mem' was not declared in this scope – user3728501 Mar 5 '16 at 17:53
  • 1
    @userrandomnumbers: If you want precise help you are going to have to post precise code and not just something that's kinda-sorta like what you actually have. – Matti Virkkunen Mar 5 '16 at 17:56
  • 1
    @user3728501: Might want to make it a new question even. Maybe. – Matti Virkkunen Mar 5 '16 at 18:01
0

Yes, this is a good approach. You can make the call more pleasing by writing it as (*this)[0].

However, if you don't mind bypassing the base class's interface (I wouldn't — I'd actually make mem private), you can write mem[0]!

If you're having trouble with that, it's due to something not in your testcase. For example, if it's a base member in a class template, you may need to write this->mem[0] due to a C++ oddity.

  • Why is this->[0]; not allowed? Seems syntactically inconsistent? – user3728501 Mar 5 '16 at 17:55
  • @user3728501: It's not inconsistent. – Lightness Races with Monica Mar 5 '16 at 17:55
  • I could call this->Get(0), or this->anyotherfunction() ? – user3728501 Mar 5 '16 at 17:56
  • @user3728501: [] is not function call notation. You don't write obj.[0] so a lack of ptr->[0] is not an inconsistency. – Lightness Races with Monica Mar 5 '16 at 17:56
  • ie; Why does the compiler not interpret this->[N]; as this->operator[](N); – user3728501 Mar 5 '16 at 17:57

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