12

I've got an iterator with some objects in it and I wanted to create a collection of uniqueUsers in which I only list every user once. So playing around a bit I tried it with both a list and a dict:

>>> for m in ms: print m.to_user  # let's first look what's inside ms
...
Pete Kramer
Pete Kramer
Pete Kramer
>>> 
>>> uniqueUsers = []  # Create an empty list
>>> for m in ms:
...     if m.to_user not in uniqueUsers:
...         uniqueUsers.append(m.to_user)
...
>>> uniqueUsers
[Pete Kramer]  # This is what I would expect
>>> 
>>> uniqueUsers = {}  # Now let's create a dict
>>> for m in ms:
...     if m.to_user not in uniqueUsers:
...         uniqueUsers[m.to_user] = 1
...
>>> uniqueUsers
{Pete Kramer: 1, Pete Kramer: 1, Pete Kramer: 1}

So I tested it by converting the dict to a list when doing the if statement, and that works as I would expect it to:

>>> uniqueUsers = {}
>>> for m in ms:
...     if m.to_user not in list(uniqueUsers):
...         uniqueUsers[m.to_user] = 1
...
>>> uniqueUsers
{Pete Kramer: 1}

and I can get a similar result by testing against uniqueUsers.keys().

The thing is that I don't understand why this difference occurs. I always thought that if you do if object in dict, it simply creates a list of the dicts keys and tests agains that, but that's obviously not the case.

Can anybody explain how object in dict internally works and why it doesn't behave similar to object in list (as I would expect it to)?

  • 2
    @vaultah It has to (otherwise you would get a unhashable TypeError), but the implementation is likely not aligned with the implementation of __eq__. – poke Mar 6 '16 at 12:01
  • How did you implemented the to_user and main class? Python dictionaries doesn't preserve duplicate objects because thy have same __hash__ value, but if you create multiple instance from one class each time you'll get a new object with different hash value. (with due to this point that they have same representation), but the result in your dictionary wont be the representation because they are same strings and hence have same hash value. – Kasramvd Mar 6 '16 at 12:03
  • @poke You've posted a great answer below +1. However, your comment about unhashable TypeError isn't correct, as shown in this answer. – aneroid Mar 6 '16 at 12:29
  • @aneroid OP’s code suggests that there is a custom __eq__ implementation. That means if it wasn’t implemented as well, __hash__ would return None, making the object unhashable. – poke Mar 6 '16 at 12:32
  • @poke Agreed on the OP's implementation of to_user details determining the cause of the issue. I also suspect it's returning an object and not a string, since the output of uniqueUsers is not the standard repr of a string/string keys. But... I just tried it without implementing __hash__ and no Error is raised and the behaviour is identical to his issue. So it's either a badly implemented hash as you've said in your answer or a non-existent one, which doesn't raise an error. – aneroid Mar 6 '16 at 13:03
16

In order to understand what’s going on, you have to understand how the in operator, the membership test, behaves for the different types.

For lists, this is pretty simple due to what lists fundamentally are: Ordered arrays that do not care about duplicates. The only possible way to peform a membership test here is to iterate over the list and check every item on equality. Something like this:

# x in lst
for item in lst:
    if x == item:
        return True
return False

Dictionaries are a bit different: They are hash tables were keys are meant to be unique. Hash tables require the keys to be hashable which essentially means that there needs to be an explicit function that converts the object into an integer. This hash value is then used to put the key/value mapping somewhere into the hash table.

Since the hash value determines where in the hash table an item is placed, it’s critical that objects which are meant to be identical produce the same hash value. So the following implication has to be true: x == y => hash(x) == hash(y). The reverse does not need to be true though; it’s perfectly valid to have different objects produce the same hash value.

When a membership test on a dictionary is performed, then the dictionary will first look for the hash value. If it can find it, then it will perform an equality check on all items it found; if it didn’t find the hash value, then it assumes that it’s a different object:

# x in dct
h = hash(x)
items = getItemsForHash(dct, h)
for item in items:
    if x == item:
        return True
# items is empty, or no match inside the loop
return False

Since you get the desired result when using a membership test against a list, that means that your object implements the equality comparison (__eq__) correctly. But since you do not get the correct result when using a dictionary, there seems to be a __hash__ implementation that is out of sync with the equality comparison implementation:

>>> class SomeType:
        def __init__ (self, x):
            self.x = x
        def __eq__ (self, other):
            return self.x == other.x
        def __hash__ (self):
            # bad hash implementation
            return hash(id(self))

>>> l = [SomeType(1)]
>>> d = { SomeType(1): 'x' }
>>> x = SomeType(1)
>>> x in l
True
>>> x in d
False

Note that for new-style classes in Python 2 (classes that inherit from object), this “bad hash implementation” (which is based on the object id) is the default. So when you do not implement your own __hash__ function, it still uses that one. This ultimately means that unless your __eq__ only performs an identity check (the default), the hash function will be out of sync.

So the solution is to implement __hash__ in a way that it aligns with the rules used in __eq__. For example, if you compare two members self.x and self.y, then you should use a compound hash over those two members. The easiest way to do that is to return the hash value of a tuple of those values:

class SomeType (object):
    def __init__ (self, x, y):
        self.x = x
        self.y = y

    def __eq__ (self, other):
        return self.x == other.x and self.y == other.y

    def __hash__ (self):
        return hash((self.x, self.y))

Note that you should not make an object hashable if it is mutable:

If a class defines mutable objects and implements an __eq__() method, it should not implement __hash__(), since the implementation of hashable collections requires that a key’s hash value is immutable (if the object’s hash value changes, it will be in the wrong hash bucket).

  • 2
    "and technically required too since there are only so many numbers" - in Python, there are not only so many numbers. – user253751 Mar 6 '16 at 20:06
  • 1
    Evaluate something like 9**100000 in Python, and then tell me Python has a limited amount of numbers. (Ignoring memory limits, because objects are also limited by memory) – user253751 Mar 6 '16 at 20:09
  • 1
    In the reference interpreter at least, every Python object can be assigned a unique number called a memory address. – user253751 Mar 6 '16 at 20:20
  • 2
    Actually, that part—and this discussion—is irrelevant to the question and my answer, so I’ve removed the part now from my answer (I didn’t think a side note in parentheses would have been this controversial). Since this comment thread will then lose its context, I’ll also delete my comments, so you may want to do the same. – poke Mar 6 '16 at 22:52
  • Thanks for your elaborate answer. The model was coming from the Peewee ORM, so I listed an issue on github, and the developer immediately added a commit to solve it (github.com/coleifer/peewee/commit/…). Thanks again for the explanation! – kramer65 Mar 7 '16 at 9:53
8

TL;DR: The in test calls __eq__ for lists. For dicts, it first calls __hash__ and if the hash matches, then calls __eq__.

  1. The in test only calls __eq__ for lists.
    • Without an __eq__, the in-ness comparison is always False.
  2. For dicts, you need a correctly implemented __hash__ and __eq__ to be able to compare objects in it correctly:

    • First gets the object's hash from __hash__

      • Without __hash__, for new-style classes, it uses id() which is unique for all objects created and hence never matches an existing one unless it's the same object.
      • And as @poke pointed out in a comment:

        In Python 2, new style classes (inheriting from object) inherit object’s __hash__ implementation which is based on id(), so that’s where that comes from.

    • If the hash matches, then __eq__ is called for that object with the other.

      • The result then depends on what __eq__ returns.
    • If the hash does not match, then __eq__ is not called.

So the in test calls __eq__ for lists and for dicts...but for dicts, only after __hash__ returns a matching hash. And not having a __hash__ doesn't return None, doesn't throw an error and doesn't make it "unhashable". ...in Python 2. To use your to_user class correctly as dict keys, you do need to have a __hash__ method which is implemented correctly, in sync with __eq__.

Details:

The check for m.to_user not in uniqueUsers "object in list" worked correctly because you have probably implemented an __eq__ method, as @poke pointed out. (And it appears to_user returns an object, not a string.)

The same check doesn't work for "object in dict" either because:
(a) __hash__ in that class is badly implemented, as @poke also pointed out.
(b) Or you have not implemented __hash__ at all. This doesn't raise an error in Python2 new-style classes.

Using the class in this answer as a starting point:

>>> class Test2(object):
...     def __init__(self, name):
...         self.name = name
...
...     def __eq__(self, other):
...         return self.name == other.name
...
>>> test_Dict = {}
>>> test_List = []
>>>
>>> obj1 = Test2('a')
>>> obj2 = Test2('a')
>>>
>>> test_Dict[obj1] = 'x'
>>> test_Dict[obj2] = 'y'
>>>
>>> test_List.append(obj1)
>>> test_List.append(obj2)
>>>
>>> test_Dict
{<__main__.Test2 object at 0x0000000002EFC518>: 'x', <__main__.Test2 object at 0x0000000002EFC940>: 'y'}
>>> test_List
[<__main__.Test2 object at 0x0000000002EFC518>, <__main__.Test2 object at 0x0000000002EFC940>]
>>>
>>> Test2('a') in test_Dict
False
>>> Test2('a') in test_List
True
  • 2
    Your tl;dr has a small mistake: The __eq__ is indeed called for finding elements in a dictionary, but only after evaluating the object’s hash and finding a hash match. – poke Mar 6 '16 at 22:58
  • Suspected that. And also, if __eq__ is not defined but __hash__ is, then the in tests still fails for dicts. It needs both. Of course, List uses only __eq__ so without it, it always false. – aneroid Mar 6 '16 at 23:24
  • Yeah, the hash value is only used as a first step in dictionaries to find the place where the element would go in the hash table. The dictionary will still use an equality check on all elements it finds to make sure. And if not overriden, __eq__ will fall back to an identity check. – poke Mar 6 '16 at 23:32
  • Wrote some test classes to show the different combos. I'll post a pastebin link instead of very long code. – aneroid Mar 6 '16 at 23:45

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