I have a DataFrame df with 40 columns and many records.

df:

User_id | Col1 | Col2 | Col3 | Col4 | Col5 | Col6 | Col7 |...| Col39

For each column except the user_id column I want to check for outliers and remove the hole record, if an outlier appears.

For outlier detection on each row I decided to simply use 5th and 95th percentile (I know it's not the best statistical way):

Code what I have so far:

P = np.percentile(df.Col1, [5, 95])
new_df = df[(df.Col1 > P[0]) & (df.Col1 < P[1])]

Question: How can I apply this approach to all columns (except user_id) without doing this by hand? My goal is to get a dataframe without records that had outliers.

Thank you!

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The initial dataset.

print(df.head())

   Col0  Col1  Col2  Col3  Col4  User_id
0    49    31    93    53    39       44
1    69    13    84    58    24       47
2    41    71     2    43    58       64
3    35    56    69    55    36       67
4    64    24    12    18    99       67

First removing the User_id column

filt_df = df.loc[:, df.columns != 'User_id']

Then, computing percentiles.

low = .05
high = .95
quant_df = filt_df.quantile([low, high])
print(quant_df)

       Col0   Col1  Col2   Col3   Col4
0.05   2.00   3.00   6.9   3.95   4.00
0.95  95.05  89.05  93.0  94.00  97.05

Next filtering values based on computed percentiles. To do that I use an apply by columns and that's it !

filt_df = filt_df.apply(lambda x: x[(x>quant_df.loc[low,x.name]) & 
                                    (x < quant_df.loc[high,x.name])], axis=0)

Bringing the User_id back.

filt_df = pd.concat([df.loc[:,'User_id'], filt_df], axis=1)

Last, rows with NaN values can be dropped simply like this.

filt_df.dropna(inplace=True)
print(filt_df.head())

   User_id  Col0  Col1  Col2  Col3  Col4
1       47    69    13    84    58    24
3       67    35    56    69    55    36
5        9    95    79    44    45    69
6       83    69    41    66    87     6
9       87    50    54    39    53    40

Checking result

print(filt_df.head())

   User_id  Col0  Col1  Col2  Col3  Col4
0       44    49    31   NaN    53    39
1       47    69    13    84    58    24
2       64    41    71   NaN    43    58
3       67    35    56    69    55    36
4       67    64    24    12    18   NaN

print(filt_df.describe())

          User_id       Col0       Col1       Col2       Col3       Col4
count  100.000000  89.000000  88.000000  88.000000  89.000000  89.000000
mean    48.230000  49.573034  45.659091  52.727273  47.460674  57.157303
std     28.372292  25.672274  23.537149  26.509477  25.823728  26.231876
min      0.000000   3.000000   5.000000   7.000000   4.000000   5.000000
25%     23.000000  29.000000  29.000000  29.500000  24.000000  36.000000
50%     47.000000  50.000000  40.500000  52.500000  49.000000  59.000000
75%     74.250000  69.000000  67.000000  75.000000  70.000000  79.000000
max     99.000000  95.000000  89.000000  92.000000  91.000000  97.000000

How to generate the test dataset

np.random.seed(0)
nb_sample = 100
num_sample = (0,100)

d = dict()
d['User_id'] = np.random.randint(num_sample[0], num_sample[1], nb_sample)
for i in range(5):
    d['Col' + str(i)] = np.random.randint(num_sample[0], num_sample[1], nb_sample)

df = DataFrame.from_dict(d)
  • Worked! But in my case, I had to change (lambda x: x[(x>quant_df.loc[low,x.name]) & (x < quant_df.loc[high,x.name])], axis=0) to (lambda x: x[(x >= quant_df.loc[low,x.name]) & (x <= quant_df.loc[high,x.name])], axis=0). Otherwise all records will be dropped. I have medians which are very close to zero, like 0,00001, maybe that's why. – Mi Funk Mar 6 '16 at 17:05
  • Great ! I don't see the difference between the two lambda except the line feed. – Romain Mar 6 '16 at 17:11
  • 1
    I included the upper and lower boundaries with ">=" and "<=" instead using ">" and "<". – Mi Funk Mar 6 '16 at 17:20
  • After that why are we getting lot of "NaN" which are not there in original dataset. How can we handle that? – DreamerP Mar 27 at 12:59

What you are describing is similar to the process of winsorizing, which truncates values to the 5th and 95th percentiles instead of eliminating them completely.

Here's an example:

import pandas as pd
from scipy.stats import mstats
%matplotlib inline

test_data = pd.Series(range(30))
test_data.plot()

Original data

# Truncate values to the 5th and 95th percentiles
transformed_test_data = pd.Series(mstats.winsorize(test_data, limits=[0.05, 0.05])) 
transformed_test_data.plot()

Winsorized data

Use an inner join. Something like this should work

cols = df.columns.tolist()
cols.remove('user_id') #remove user_id from list of columns

P = np.percentile(df[cols[0]], [5, 95])
new_df = df[(df[cols[0] > P[0]) & (df[cols[0]] < P[1])]
for col in cols[1:]:
    P = np.percentile(df[col], [5, 95])
    new_df = new_df.join(df[(df[col] > P[0]]) & (df[col] < P[1])], how='inner')

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.