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I have a perl script which emulates a tee command so I can get output written to the terminal and a log file. It works something like this (error checking &c omitted).

$pid = open(STDOUT, '-|');
# Above is perl magic that forks a process and sets up a pipe with the
# child's STDIN being one end of the pipe and the parent's STDOUT (in
# this case) being the other.
if ($pid == 0)
{
    # Child. 
    # Open log file
    while (<STDIN>)
    {
       # print to STDOUT and log file
    }
    #close log files
    exit;
}
# parent
open STDERR, '>&STDOUT';
# do lots of system("...") calls
close STDERR;
close STDOUT;
exit;

This sometimes hangs, and invariably if you look at the processes and the stacks of said processes, the parent is hanging in one of the closes, waiting for the child to exit, whereas the child is hanging reading something from a file (which has to be STDIN, because there's no other file).

I'm rather at a loss as to how to deal with this. The problem seems to happen if you are running the program from a shell that isn't attached to a console - running the script in a normal shell works fine - and the only piece of code that has changed recently in that script is the addition of an open/close of a file just to touch it (and it's before the script gets to this 'tee' code).

Has anybody had problems like this before and/or have a suggestion as to what I can do to fix this? Thanks.

  • Does this always happen when detached? Does STDOUT get redirected earlier -- on the cron-ed command line, or in the program? – zdim Mar 7 '16 at 0:06
  • I cannot see the problem, for me it works either way. I updated my post with specific things I'd try, and with exact code I am using. I am thinking of the buffering/STDIN getting messed up. For example, the last prints (last buffer) don't get flushed. – zdim Mar 7 '16 at 8:16
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Update

I cannot reproduce the offending behavior. For me it runs as expected both from the terminal and from cron. (If backgrounded it will get suspended when going for fd 1,2.) Given that the problem appears when console is redirected, this is what I wanted to try

1) Turn off buffering explicitly in both the child and the parent

2) Close STDIN explicitly after the while loop

3) Trap SIGPIPE to see whether something turns up

*) Is some other piece of code actually getting tripped up?


Below are thoughts on workarounds posted at first.


It seems that the problem is with what happens to STDOUT with redirected console and with what the child then can or cannot do with it. I don't (yet) know what that is, but in the meanwhile I think that something along the following lines should at least dodge the problem.

The child can write output meant for STDOUT to yet another file, if there is no tty. This file can be the parent's redirect (if known, appended to), or another explicitly opened file that the parent would later join. It's messy, crude, and it changes the design but it may make it possible for the child to exit (by not dealing with STDOUT which may be the source of the problem).

Alternatively, the parent can control this, opening the logger child differently when there is no tty, which would completely side-step the situation but which departs even further from the design.

None of this solves the problem but it may avoid it.


For reference, this is the code that behaves as expected from cmdline and out of cron

$| = 1;
$logfile = '/path/logfile.out';

$pid = open(STDOUT, '|-');
if ($pid == 0) {
    # $| = 1;
    open $log_fh, '>', $logfile;
    while (<STDIN>) {
        print $_;
        print $log_fh $_;
    }
    # close STDIN;
    close $log_fh;
    exit;
}
open STDERR, '>&STDOUT';

print "After the fork.\n";
warn "A warn --";

close STDERR;
close STDOUT;
exit;
  • when not attached to console, STDOUT is going to a file. there isn't a STDIN but then it doesn't use or need a STDIN. Also, it's not being run in the backgroundas in running 'script &'. When it happens to me, it's being run as a cron job. – Tom Tanner Mar 6 '16 at 21:33
  • that open call forks a child and creates a pipe, which the child gets as STDIN. The problem is not that it hangs because there's no STDIN, the problem is that it hangs when it gets to the exit in the main program (it can produce a considerable amount of output before that which is all generated correctly) – Tom Tanner Mar 6 '16 at 21:44
  • the childs STDIN is the STDOUT from the parent. It wouldn't work at all if I didn't use STDIN – Tom Tanner Mar 6 '16 at 21:54
  • 2: It's not getting out of the while loop to close STDIN 3: Ther'es only oen childand it's clearly not dead. – Tom Tanner Mar 7 '16 at 8:24
  • I was thinking of a messed up pipe, it's just not closing after it completes the read. – zdim Mar 7 '16 at 8:26
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Well, after some experimentation it seems that opening STDOUT directly appears to be at least part of the reason. My code now reads like this:

$pid = open($handle, '|-');
if ($pid == 0)
{
    # Child. 
    # Open log file
    while (<STDIN>)
    {
       # print to STDOUT and log file
    }
    #close log files
    exit;
}
# parent
open my $oldout, '>&STDOUT';
open my $olderr, '>&STDERR';
open STDOUT, '>&', $handle;
open STDERR, '>&', $handle;
# do lots of system("...") calls
open STDOUT, '>&', $oldout;
open STDERR, '>&', $olderr;
close $handle or die "Log child exited unexpectedly: $!\n";
exit;

which if nothing else, looks cleaner (but still messier than I'd like as I don't know what to do if any of those dups has an error). But I'm still unclear as to why opening and closing a handle much earlier in the code made such a difference to this bit.

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