5

I was creating a function to compute trimmed mean. To do this I removed highest and lowest percent of data and then the mean is computed as usual. What I have so far is :

def trimmed_mean(data, percent):
    from numpy import percentile

    if percent < 50:
        data_trimmed = [i for i in data
                        if i > percentile(data, percent)
                        and i < percentile(data, 100-percent)]
    else:
        data_trimmed = [i for i in data
                        if i < percentile(data, percent)
                        and i > percentile(data, 100-percent)]

    return sum(data_trimmed) / float(len(data_trimmed))

But I do get the wrong result. So, for [37, 33, 33, 32, 29, 28, 28, 23, 22, 22, 22, 21, 21, 21, 20, 20, 19, 19, 18, 18, 18, 18, 16, 15, 14, 14, 14, 12, 12, 9, 6] by 10% mean should be 20.16 while I get 20.0.

Is there any other way to do removing top and bottom data in python? Or is there anything else that I have done wrong?

8
  • @Анастасия, perhaps there's no need to thank people for editing your question because there might be tens of them while the comment section will get flooded with thanks.
    – ForceBru
    Mar 7, 2016 at 15:12
  • In the data that you gave, what should you get in the values for data_trimmed using 10%?
    – jtitusj
    Mar 7, 2016 at 15:14
  • It should be data_trimmed = [32, 29, 28, 28, 23, 22, 22, 22, 21, 21, 21, 20, 20, 19, 19, 18, 18, 18, 18, 16, 15, 14, 14, 14, 12] Mar 7, 2016 at 15:17
  • should 12 be included in data_trimmed? percentile(data, 10) = 12.
    – jtitusj
    Mar 7, 2016 at 15:22
  • Yes, 12 should be there. Mar 7, 2016 at 15:23

4 Answers 4

7

You can take a look at this related question:Trimmed Mean with Percentage Limit in Python?

In short for scipy version > 0.14.0 the following does the job

from scipy import stats
m = stats.trim_mean(X, percentage)

If you do not want to have an dependency on an external library then you can of course revert to an approach as shown in Chip Grandits answer.

5

I would suggest sorting the array first and then just take a "slice in the the middle."

#some "fancy" numpy sort or even just plain old sorted()
#sorted_data = sorted(data) #uncomment to use plain python sorted 
n = len(sorted_data)
outliers = n*percent/100 #may want some rounding logic if n is small
trimmed_data = sorted_data[outliers: n-outliers]
1
2

Here:

import numpy as np
def trimmed_mean(data, percent):
    data = np.array(sorted(data))
    trim = int(percent*data.size/100.0)
    return data[trim:-trim].mean()
2

Maybe this'll work:

data = [37, 33, 33, 32, 29, 28, 28, 23, 22, 22, 22, 21, 21, 21, 20, 20, 19, 19, 18, 18, 18, 18, 16, 15, 14, 14, 14, 12, 12, 9, 6]
percent = .1 # == 10%

def trimmed_mean(data, percent):
    # sort list
    data = sorted(data)
    # number of elements to remove from both ends of list
    g = int(percent * len(data))
    # remove elements
    data = data[g:-g]
    # cast sum to float to avoid implicit casting to int
    return float(sum(data)) / len(data)

print trimmed_mean(data, percent)

Output:

$ python trimmed_mean.py 
20.16

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.