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I am writing CMake macros for the first time, and I have a hard time understanding how variables work. Most specifically, ${a} seems to have a different meaning than "${a}".

For example here: Passing a list to a CMake macro

I fail to understand when I am supposed to add quotes, and what are the bigger underlying principles.

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Two principles of CMake you have to keep in mind:

  1. CMake is a script language and arguments are evaluated after the variables are expanded
  2. CMake differentiates between normal strings and list variables (strings with semicolon delimiters)

Examples

  • set(_my_text "A B C") with message("${_my_text}") would give A B C
  • set(_my_list A B C) with message("${_my_list}") would give A;B;C
  • set(_my_list "A" "B" "C") with message("${_my_list}") would give A;B;C
  • set(_my_list "A" "B" "C") with message(${_my_list}) would give ABC

Some Rules of Thumb

There are some rules of thumb you should consider:

  1. a) When your variable contains text - especially one that could contain semicolons - you should add quotes.

    Reasoning: A semicolon is a delimiter for list elements in CMake. So put quotes around a text that is supposed to be one (it works everywhere and for me personally looks better with CMake syntax highlighting)

    EDIT: Thanks for the hint from @schieferstapel

    b) To be more precise: A variable content with spaces that already had quotes does keep those quotes (imagine as it getting part of the variable's content). This works everywhere also unquoted (normal or user-defined function parameters) with the prominent exception of if() calls, where CMake re-interprets the content of unquoted variables after variable expansion (see also rule of thumb #3 and policy CMP0054: Only interpret if() arguments as variables or keywords when unquoted)

    Examples:

    • set(_my_text "A B C") with message(${_my_text}) would also give A B C
    • set(_my_text "A;B;C") with if (${_my_text} STREQUAL "A;B;C") would give if given arguments: "A" "B" "C" "STREQUAL" "A;B;C" Unknown arguments specified
  2. If your variable contains a list you normally don't add quotes.

    Reasoning: If you give something like a file list to an CMake command it normally expect a list of strings and not one string containing a list. The difference you can see e.g. in the foreach() command accepting ITEMS or LISTS.

  3. if() statements are a special case where you normally don't even put the braces.

    Reasoning: A string could - after expansion - evaluate again to a variable name. To prevent this it's recommended to just name the variable whose content you want to compare (e.g. if (_my_text STREQUAL "A B C")).


COMMAND Examples

  • set(_my_text "A B C") with COMMAND "${CMAKE_COMMAND}" -E echo "${_my_text}" would
    • call cmake.exe -E echo "A B C" on VS/Windows
    • call cmake -E echo A\ B\ C on GCC/Ubuntu
    • give A B C
  • set(_my_text "A B C") with COMMAND "${CMAKE_COMMAND}" -E echo "${_my_text}" VERBATIM would
    • call cmake.exe -E echo "A B C" on VS/Windows
    • call cmake -E echo "A B C" on GCC/Ubuntu
    • give A B C
  • set(_my_list A B C) with COMMAND "${CMAKE_COMMAND}" -E echo "${_my_list}" would
    • call cmake.exe -E echo A;B;C
    • give A, B: command not found, C: command not found
  • set(_my_list A B C) with COMMAND "${CMAKE_COMMAND}" -E echo "${_my_list}" VERBATIM would
    • call cmake.exe -E echo "A;B;C"
    • give A;B;C
  • set(_my_list "A" "B" "C") with COMMAND "${CMAKE_COMMAND}" -E echo "${_my_list}" VERBATIM would
    • call cmake.exe -E echo "A;B;C"
    • give A;B;C
  • set(_my_list "A" "B" "C") with COMMAND "${CMAKE_COMMAND}" -E echo ${_my_list} VERBATIM would
    • call cmake.exe -E echo A B C
    • give A B C
  • set(_my_list "A + B" "=" "C") with COMMAND "${CMAKE_COMMAND}" -E echo ${_my_list} VERBATIM would
    • call cmake.exe -E echo "A + B" = C
    • give A + B = C

Some Rules of Thumb with add_custom_target()/add_custom_command()/execute_process()

There are some rules of thumb you should consider when you use variables in COMMAND calls:

  1. a) Use quotes for the arguments that contain file paths (like the first argument containing the executable itself).

    Reasoning: It could contain spaces and could be reinterpreted as separate arguments to the COMMAND call

    b) See above, works also if the variable set() did include quotes.

  2. Use quotes only if you want to concatenate something into a single parameter to be passed to executable that is called.

    Reasoning: A variable could contain a list of parameters which - when using quotes - won't be correctly extracted (semicolons instead of spaces)

  3. Always add the VERBATIM option with add_custom_target()/add_custom_command()

    Reasoning: Otherwise the cross-platform behavior is undefined and you could get surprises with your quoted strings.

References

  • -1 because the reasoning behind the first rule of thumb #1 is wrong. If you pass a variable to a function (func(${X}), without quotes) and X contains spaces, X is still only one argument and does not get expanded/evaluated like you say. It would be too error-prone (like it is in e.g. POSIX shells) to quote every variable that may contain a path with spaces. – schieferstapel Sep 29 '17 at 7:51
  • @schieferstapel Thanks for the hint. You're right and in that case there are no quotes necessary. I updated my answer accordingly. But I still think it would be necessary if I don't know if the variable may contain a list. And I've to check the add_custom_command() part again (thought I've tested it back then, but I'll double-check). – Florian Sep 30 '17 at 9:34

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