2

When I run the following:

growthRates = [3, 4, 5, 0, 3]
for each in growthRates:
    print each
    assert growthRates >= 0, 'Growth Rate is not between 0 and 100'
    assert growthRates <= 100, 'Growth Rate is not between 0 and 100'

I get:

3
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "ps4.py", line 132, in <module>
    testNestEggVariable()
  File "ps4.py", line 126, in testNestEggVariable
    savingsRecord = nestEggVariable(salary, save, growthRates)
  File "ps4.py", line 106, in nestEggVariable
    assert growthRates <= 100, 'Growth Rate is not between 0 and 100'
AssertionError: Growth Rate is not between 0 and 100

Why is that?

  • each is a poor choice for the loop variable. See how you confused even yourself. If you don't want to call the variable growthRate, how about for item in growthRates? – John La Rooy Aug 27 '10 at 23:04
  • @gnibbler I don't see the difference. For (each item) in x seems to be the same for me. I could see if you argued for for rate in growthRates, that being more useful! – Noah Clark Aug 28 '10 at 1:59
10

Do:

assert each >= 0, 'Growth Rate is not between 0 and 100'

not:

assert growthRates >= 0, 'Growth Rate is not between 0 and 100'
  • 8
    Better yet, it could be assert 0 <= each <= 100. – mjschultz Aug 27 '10 at 15:07
  • I had this syntax originally (with growthRates), but changed it out to troubleshoot it. I was really confused when one worked and one didn't, but as explained below it makes sense now! Thanks. – Noah Clark Aug 27 '10 at 15:36
6
assert 0 <= each <= 100, 'Growth Rate %i is not between 0 and 100.' % each

Your asserts do not fail of course then, but now the growthRates > 100 because growthRates is list and 0 is integer and 'list'>'integer'.

  • 2
    +1: This is the only response so far that answers the question -- which was "Why is that?" – martineau Aug 27 '10 at 20:42
4

assert (each >= 0) not assert (growthRates >= 0) :-)

2

You can also use:

growthRates = [0, 10, 100, -1]
assert all(0<=each<=100 for each in growthRates), 'growthRate is not between 0 and 100'

Traceback (most recent call last):
File "any.py", line 2, in <module>
assert all([0<=each<=100 for each in growthRates]), 'growthRate is not between 0 and 100'
AssertionError: growthRate is not between 0 and 100
  • You don't need the []. – Katriel Aug 27 '10 at 15:49
  • Thanks. <15 chars> – Chinmay Kanchi Aug 27 '10 at 15:54
0

Test for each instead of the list growthRates.

You could also use:

growthRates = [3, 4, 5, 0, 3]
testRange = range(0,100)
for each in growthRates:
    print each
    assert each in testRange, 'Growth Rate is not between 0 and 100'
  • It would be to use range checking (0<=rate<=100) rather than containment testing (i.e. in) here because it's more efficient and could easily handle all the possible floating point rates such as 6.789. – martineau Aug 27 '10 at 21:24

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