9

I'm using Microsoft Unity as my IoC container. I have a number of extension classes which adds useful methods to my business objects This is the sort of code I use today:

public static class BusinessObjectExtensions
{
    public static bool CanDoStuff(this BusinessObject obj) 
    {
        var repository = BusinessHost.Resolver.Resolve<IRepository>();
        var args = new EArgument { Name = obj.Name };
        return repository.AMethod(obj.UserName, args);
    }
}

Is there a better way to manage dependency injection for extension classes?

  • i think, It does not showing having any requirement to be an extension method .. so many dependency objects are their – Moumit Mar 8 '16 at 10:14
6

You should actually try to avoid extensionmethods unless they only work on internal data (properties in the class itself), or simple datatypes provided in the method. You should not talk to other dependencies in your extension methods. If you follow this rule, you should not need to inject extension-classes with your IoC at all.

  • 1
    That's a good point. Maybe I should create a management class instead... – Leonard Mar 8 '16 at 10:12
10

The de facto default way of Dependency Injection by Constructor Injection is not possible for static classes. It would be possible to use Parameter Injection like below, however that is not a very clean way.

public static class BusinessObjectExtensions
{
    public static bool CanDoStuff(this BusinessObject obj, IRepository repository)
    {
        var args = new EArgument { Name = obj.Name };
        return repository.AMethod(obj.UserName, args);
    }
}
  • 3
    This should be the accepted answer. The only way is method injection. – tocqueville May 23 '18 at 11:46
  • how can we have static variables, assigned using non-constructor because extension class does not have constructor? – kudlatiger Jul 18 at 10:11
  • @mnwsmit where did u assign repository? and where it is declared? – kudlatiger Jul 19 at 8:45
3

Why would you do that?

This raises the coupling in your application to the roof and can be very confusing for your teammates to use the extension method (they'll have to keep in mind to inject the repository each time the method is used).

Instead, create a separate class and use constructor injection to inject the IRepository instance:

public class StuffExecuter    
{
    private readonly IRepository _repository;

    public StuffExecuter(IRepository repository)
    {
        _repository = repository;
    }

    public bool CanExecute(BusinessObject obj)
    {
        _repository.Add(obj.UserName, new EArgument
        {
            Name = obj.Name
        });
    }
}
  • This is how we do it by design, but the example above was taken from a really specific, if not entirely isolated, use case, wherein we believed in the convenience of hooking the functionality we needed to our business object. In hindsight, it wasn't a good idea, so I'll move it elsewhere. Thank you! – Leonard Mar 8 '16 at 10:25

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.