I have some Scala code that makes fairly heavy use of generics, and I have gleaned from the docs that using a manifest in the parametrization constraints can help me work around the type erasure issues (e.g. I want to instantiate a new object of the generic type). Only, I'd like to understand more about how this works. It almost feels like some sort of hashmap that's getting an entry for every invocation site... Can anyone here elaborate?

class Image[T <: Pixel[T] : Manifest](fun() => T, size: Array[Int], data: Array[T]) {
    def this(fun: () => T, size: Array[T]) {
        this(fun, size, new Array[T](size(0) * size(1));
    }
}

This is something that doesn't seem to be covered in any of the documentation that I found on the site, and on Google I mostly get older posts that have very different syntax, and since 2.8 seems to have a lot of things changed, I'm not sure those are still accurate.

  • possible duplicate of What is a Manifest in Scala and when do you need it? – Daniel C. Sobral Aug 27 '10 at 19:38
  • 1
    I'm not sure that those answers really answer how it works, though? At the very least it could be clearer. Is the point that the compiler adds an extra argument to methods/functions to hold the concrete class for the generic parameter? And what's the <:< operator, anyway? – djc Aug 27 '10 at 19:42
  • Have a look here: debasishg.blogspot.com/2010/08/… – michael.kebe Aug 27 '10 at 19:47
  • 1
    Thanks for the link; it doesn't talk about manifests, though. – djc Aug 27 '10 at 20:21
up vote 35 down vote accepted

It's been awhile since I dug through the source code for Scala in a quest to answer the same question... but the short answer, as I recall -

Manifest is a cheat code to allow the COMPILER to get around Type erasure (it isn't being used at runtime). It causes multiple code paths to be generated at compile time for the possible input types matching the manifest.

The Manifest is resolved implicitly, but if there is any ambiguity at compile time about what the Manifest type is, the compiler WILL stop.

With a copy of a Manifest you have a few things available. The main things you typically want is either the java.lang.Class that was erased via erasure:

class BoundedManifest[T <: Any : Manifest](value: T) {
  val m = manifest[T]
  m.erasure.toString match {
    case "class java.lang.String" => println("String")
    case "double" | "int"  => println("Numeric value.")
    case x => println("WTF is a '%s'?".format(x))
    }
}

class ImplicitManifest[T <: Any](value: T)(implicit m: Manifest[T]) {
  m.erasure.toString match {
    case "class java.lang.String" => println("String")
    case "double" | "int" => println("Numeric value.")
    case x => println("WTF is a '%s'?".format(x))
  }
}

new BoundedManifest("Foo Bar!")
// String 
new BoundedManifest(5)
// Numeric value.
new BoundedManifest(5.2)
// Numeric value.
new BoundedManifest(BigDecimal("8.62234525"))
// WTF is a 'class scala.math.BigDecimal'?
new ImplicitManifest("Foo Bar!")
// String 
new ImplicitManifest(5)
// Numeric value.
new ImplicitManifest(5.2)
// Numeric value.
new ImplicitManifest(BigDecimal("8.62234525"))
// WTF is a 'class scala.math.BigDecimal'?

This is a rather wonky example but shows what is going on. I ran that for the output as well FWIW on Scala 2.8.

The [T ... : Manifest] boundary is new in Scala 2.8... you used to have to grab the manifest implicitly as shown in ImplicitManifest. You don't actually GET a copy of the Manifest. But you can fetch one inside your code by saying val m = manifest[T] ... manifest[_] is defined on Predef and demonstrably will find the proper manifest type inside a boundaried block.

The other two major items you get from a Manifest is <:< and >:> which test subtype/supertype of one manifest versus another. If I recall correctly these are VERY naive implementation wise and don't always match but I have a bunch of production code using them to test against a few possible erased inputs. A simple example of checking against another manifest:

class BoundedManifestCheck[T <: Any : Manifest](value: T) {
  val m = manifest[T]
  if (m <:< manifest[AnyVal]) {
    println("AnyVal (primitive)")
  } else if (m <:< manifest[AnyRef]) {
    println("AnyRef")
  } else {
    println("Not sure what the base type of manifest '%s' is.".format(m.erasure))
  }
}


new BoundedManifestCheck("Foo Bar!")
// AnyRef
new BoundedManifestCheck(5)
// AnyVal (primitive)
new BoundedManifestCheck(5.2)    
// AnyVal (primitive)
new BoundedManifestCheck(BigDecimal("8.62234525"))
// AnyRef

Jorge Ortiz has a great blog post (albeit old) on this: http://www.scala-blogs.org/2008/10/manifests-reified-types.html

EDIT:

You can actually see what Scala is doing by asking it to print out the results of the erasure compiler phase.

Running, on my last example above scala -Xprint:erasure test.scala produces the following result:

final class Main extends java.lang.Object with ScalaObject {
  def this(): object Main = {
    Main.super.this();
    ()
  };
  def main(argv: Array[java.lang.String]): Unit = {
    val args: Array[java.lang.String] = argv;
    {
      final class $anon extends java.lang.Object {
        def this(): anonymous class $anon = {
          $anon.super.this();
          ()
        };
        class BoundedManifestCheck extends java.lang.Object with ScalaObject {
          <paramaccessor> private[this] val value: java.lang.Object = _;
          implicit <paramaccessor> private[this] val evidence$1: scala.reflect.Manifest = _;
          def this($outer: anonymous class $anon, value: java.lang.Object, evidence$1: scala.reflect.Manifest): BoundedManifestCheck = {
            BoundedManifestCheck.super.this();
            ()
          };
          private[this] val m: scala.reflect.Manifest = scala.this.Predef.manifest(BoundedManifestCheck.this.evidence$1);
          <stable> <accessor> def m(): scala.reflect.Manifest = BoundedManifestCheck.this.m;
          if (BoundedManifestCheck.this.m().<:<(scala.this.Predef.manifest(reflect.this.Manifest.AnyVal())))
            scala.this.Predef.println("AnyVal (primitive)")
          else
            if (BoundedManifestCheck.this.m().<:<(scala.this.Predef.manifest(reflect.this.Manifest.Object())))
              scala.this.Predef.println("AnyRef")
            else
              scala.this.Predef.println(scala.this.Predef.augmentString("Not sure what the base type of manifest '%s' is.").format(scala.this.Predef.genericWrapArray(Array[java.lang.Object]{BoundedManifestCheck.this.m().erasure()})));
          protected <synthetic> <paramaccessor> val $outer: anonymous class $anon = _;
          <synthetic> <stable> def Main$$anon$BoundedManifestCheck$$$outer(): anonymous class $anon = BoundedManifestCheck.this.$outer
        };
        new BoundedManifestCheck($anon.this, "Foo Bar!", reflect.this.Manifest.classType(classOf[java.lang.String]));
        new BoundedManifestCheck($anon.this, scala.Int.box(5), reflect.this.Manifest.Int());
        new BoundedManifestCheck($anon.this, scala.Double.box(5.2), reflect.this.Manifest.Double());
        new BoundedManifestCheck($anon.this, scala.package.BigDecimal().apply("8.62234525"), reflect.this.Manifest.classType(classOf[scala.math.BigDecimal]))
      };
      {
        new anonymous class $anon();
        ()
      }
    }
  }
}
  • 1
    Also notable, that removing : Manifest from the final example causes a compile failure - error: could not find implicit value for parameter m: Manifest[T] when you call val m = manifest[T]. The context boundary provides information the manifest[_] call needs to operate, so it's not optional. – Brendan W. McAdams Aug 27 '10 at 23:17

The "context bound" T ... : Manifest is syntactic sugar for an implicit argument: (implicit man: Manifest[T]). Thus at the point of instantiation of the type constructor specified by class Image, the compiler finds / supplies the Manifest for the actual type used for the type parameter T and that value "sticks with" the resulting class instance throughout its existence and "anchors" each particular instance of Image[Something] to the Manifest for its T.

  • Thanks, that helps, though I would be interested to know how the value sticks with the instance, i.e. where it is saved. – djc Aug 27 '10 at 21:17
  • Same as any constructor parameter (that is referenced outside the constructor): In a field. – Randall Schulz Aug 27 '10 at 21:24
  • edited my answer to include the output of the erasure phase. You can actually have Scalac show you what it's generating by passing the -Xprint:erasure argument to the compiler/runtime. This prints out the state of your Scala code after the erasure phase runs. – Brendan W. McAdams Aug 27 '10 at 21:27

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