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I have a batch process that converts WAV to MP3 sequentially. The problem is that after a few thousand there are too many files left open, and it runs up against the file limit.

The reason it does this is because of the code in SystemCommandTasklet:

FutureTask<Integer> systemCommandTask = new FutureTask<Integer>(new Callable<Integer>() {
    public Integer call() throws Exception {
        Process process = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(command, environmentParams, workingDirectory);
        return process.waitFor();
    }
});

This has the nasty side effect of making me rely on the JVM to clean up the processes, leaving files open and such.

I've rewritten it to be so:

FutureTask<Integer> systemCommandTask = new FutureTask<Integer>(new Callable<Integer>() {
    public Integer call() throws Exception {
        Process process = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(command, environmentParams, workingDirectory);
        int status = process.waitFor();

        process.getErrorStream().close();

        process.getInputStream().close();

        process.getOutputStream().flush();
        process.getOutputStream().close();

        process.destroy();

        return status;
    }

});

I'm 95% certain that this works on my mac (thanks to lsof), but how do I make a proper test that will work on any system to PROVE that what I am trying to do is actually working?

3 Answers 3

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  1. You should not use Runtime#exec() for that, because the process is not attached to the JVM's. Please take a look on the j.l.ProcessBuilder which returns a Process which is controlled by the JVM's process. So dumping the process may force the system to free / close resources.
  2. You should schedule and limit the processes as well using j.u.c.Executors.
  3. You also may read the limit using "ulimit -Sn" ("ulimit -Hn" should not be prefered due to system health ;).
  4. Check your tool that converts your media whether it keeps resources reserved after completion (leakage, waiting for caller signals etc).
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  • My first task, however, is to be able to recreate this error on command on any system. It does NOT happen on my mac, ever. and changing ulimit or launchctl actually causes the JVM to clean up the file handles faster! The spring batch folks wrote the original, so I'm leery of changing it willy-nilly. Aug 27, 2010 at 20:47
  • Additionally, ProcessBuilder leaves me with the same problem. How do I prove that calling Process.destroy is doing anything at all? Aug 27, 2010 at 21:31
  • I spent some time considering your #2 suggestion, but this does NOT answer my question of how to properly recreate/test this. Aug 28, 2010 at 17:10
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A proof will be difficult. But ...

Create a (Dummy)command that doesn't do much but keeps a lock on the files, just as the real thing. This makes sure your test doesn't depend on the actual command used.

Create a test that starts SystemCommandTask, using the old version, but the DummyCommand. Make it start the task often, until you get the expected exception. Lets call the number of Tasks needed N

Change the test to start 100xN Tasks.

Change the Task to the new version. If the test goes green you should be reasonably sure that your code works.

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  • My current problem is that N seems to be infinite on my dev machine. Aug 27, 2010 at 20:47
  • If you can't reproduce the problem on your system, you need a system that allows to reproduce the problem for running the test. Or a check if a file is actually opened, but I'd guess on your system no files get left open so that wouldn't work either. Aug 27, 2010 at 21:50
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You could try and code to avoid it.

Why don't you proactively limit number of tasks at a time say 100 ?

In that case you could use some pooling mechanism to execute you work like Thread Pools.

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  • I'm not running in parallel, though... this is just one .exec after the other. The problem is that unless you explicitly call process.destroy, you're depending on the JVM to close out the file. If you're going fast enough, you'll swamp the OS's limits. Aug 27, 2010 at 19:28
  • Then you could try putting sleep for few milli seconds after each processing (afer process.destroy). This way GC should get executed.
    – YoK
    Aug 27, 2010 at 19:51

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