I am trying to partition observations in a data frame into 36 groups, based on two continuous variables. More specifically, I am trying to cut each of the two variables into six groups, and then group the observations in one of the 36 different possible groups.

My attempt is below, which works. But is there a faster way to do this that avoids the double for loops?

Also, this isn't necessary, but how could I visualize the total number of observations in each group in a 6 by 6 grid? I know table() would produce a list of the 36 possible groups and their totals, but not in grid format.

set.seed(123)
x1 <- rnorm(1000)
x2 <- rnorm(1000)
data <- data.frame(x1,x2)

labs1 <- levels(cut(x1, 6))
ints1 <- cbind(lower = as.numeric(sub("\\((.+),.*", "\\1", labs1)),
               upper = as.numeric(sub("[^,]*,([^]]*)\\]", "\\1", labs1)))
labs2 <- levels(cut(x2, 6))
ints2 <- cbind(lower = as.numeric(sub("\\((.+),.*", "\\1", labs2)),
               upper = as.numeric(sub("[^,]*,([^]]*)\\]", "\\1", labs2)))

tmp <- expand.grid(labs1, labs2)
groups <- cbind(lower1 =  as.numeric(sub("\\((.+),.*", "\\1", tmp[,1])), 
                upper1 = as.numeric(sub("[^,]*,([^]]*)\\]", "\\1", tmp[,1])), 
                lower2 = as.numeric(sub("\\((.+),.*", "\\1", tmp[,2])),
                upper2 = as.numeric(sub("[^,]*,([^]]*)\\]", "\\1", tmp[,2])))

for (i in 1:1000){
  for (j in 1:36){
    if (x1[i] >= groups[j,1] & x1[i] <= groups[j,2] &
        x2[i] >= groups[j,3] & x2[i] <= groups[j,4]){
      data$group[i] <- j
    }
  }
}
  • table() can totally generate your 2D table, 6x6 or whatever you like! It's a one-liner! See my answer below. (Your mistake is to throw away the factor variable returned from cut(), instead of directly using it.) – smci Mar 12 '17 at 12:28
  • Also, if you really needed to get at the breaks values, no need for string-processing to unpack the output from cut(); just do as.vector(quantile(data$x1, probs=(0:6)/6)) which gives -2.810 -0.995 -0.389 0.009 0.411 0.962 3.241 – smci Mar 12 '17 at 12:41
  • And the term you want is binning continuous variables, not partitioning, or dividing. – smci Mar 12 '17 at 12:43
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can use a mix of apply() that will iterate thru your data.frame and which() that will iterate thru your groups array:

data$group <- apply(data, 1, FUN=function(dataRow) 
  which(
    dataRow[1] >= groups[,1] & 
    dataRow[1] <= groups[,2] & 
    dataRow[2] >= groups[,3] & 
    dataRow[2] <= groups[,4]))
  • This is way overkill, see my answer. This is just manually redoing the work already done by the cut(..., n=6) call. – smci Mar 12 '17 at 12:47
  • you're right @smci. At least OP hasn't been stuck waiting for your answer for over one year :) – HubertL Mar 13 '17 at 3:13
  • HubertL, I only saw the question yesterday and my time machine is out of action. (Can I use yours? :) – smci Mar 13 '17 at 3:18

You're overthinking things. Getting your 6x6 tables is a one-liner with table(). (Directly use the helpful factor variable created by cut(..., 6), don't just throw away the factor then manually reapply its levels and bin your variables) :

with(data, table(cut(x1, 6), cut(x2, 6)))

                 (-3.05,-1.97] (-1.97,-0.902] (-0.902,0.171] (0.171,1.24] (1.24,2.32] (2.32,3.4]
  (-2.82,-1.8]               2             10             11            7           3          0
  (-1.8,-0.793]              1             26             67           49          19          3
  (-0.793,0.216]            12             57            140          146          31          3
  (0.216,1.22]              11             49            109           95          36          6
  (1.22,2.23]                0             10             31           34          15          0
  (2.23,3.25]                0              3              5            6           2          1

# and to get the wide lines, you may need...
options('width'=199)

# or if you want more compact labels to keep it all narrow, use `cut(..., dig.lab)`
with(data, table(cut(x1, 6, dig.lab=2), cut(x2, 6, dig.lab=2)))

               (-3.1,-2] (-2,-0.9] (-0.9,0.17] (0.17,1.2] (1.2,2.3] (2.3,3.4]
  (-2.8,-1.8]          2        10          11          7         3         0
  (-1.8,-0.79]         1        26          67         49        19         3
  (-0.79,0.22]        12        57         140        146        31         3
  (0.22,1.2]          11        49         109         95        36         6
  (1.2,2.2]            0        10          31         34        15         0
  (2.2,3.2]            0         3           5          6         2         1

Admittedly the doc for both table() and cut() do not say so directly, and could use a 2D example like this. => Doc/Enhance-bug

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