168

I want using JavaScript to see if there is history or not, I mean if the back button is available on the browser or not.

2
  • 1
    related stackoverflow.com/questions/19417084/… – Adrien Be Jun 20 '14 at 8:05
  • If your purpose is to check goback is work, I think you can setup a timer after the goback call ... so you can redirect to a fallback link if the goback not work. – towry Dec 21 '20 at 1:57

20 Answers 20

128

Short answer: You can't.

Technically there is an accurate way, which would be checking the property:

history.previous

However, it won't work. The problem with this is that in most browsers this is considered a security violation and usually just returns undefined.

history.length

Is a property that others have suggested...
However, the length doesn't work completely because it doesn't indicate where in the history you are. Additionally, it doesn't always start at the same number. A browser not set to have a landing page, for example, starts at 0 while another browser that uses a landing page will start at 1.

alt text

Most of the time a link is added that calls:

history.back();

or

 history.go(-1);

and it's just expected that if you can't go back then clicking the link does nothing.

4
  • This is good info, but it does not resolve the problem. It'd be to elaborate some code that actually works on any browser. Perhaps a code that first checks the browser you are using. – Santiago Bendavid Aug 14 '17 at 21:01
  • 7
    What I'm saying is that there is not a definitive answer. You are saying the pros and cons of each approach but not how to get a script that checks what browser you are using and conditionally execute one or the other pieces of code. – Santiago Bendavid Aug 17 '17 at 21:43
  • May I know what do you mean by 'The problem with this is that in most browsers this is considered a security violation' Another user in another thread also pointed that being able to get client's browser history is violating the security, but doesn't explain why is that. Can anyone give some example what are the security threats? – Kevin Chandra Mar 15 '20 at 12:29
  • A website shouldn't be able to know a user's history which could include indirect personal information. A site can use tracking/cookies to know what the user is doing on the site itself but they shouldn't, for example, be allowed to figure out what bank I use, which school my kids go to, etc... Therefore, the browsers won't allow access to that property – McAden Mar 16 '20 at 15:12
92

There is another way to check - check the referrer. The first page usually will have an empty referrer...

if (document.referrer == "") {
    window.close()
} else {
    history.back()
}
9
  • 3
    Referrer can be hidden for privacy reasons. – Kornel Aug 16 '12 at 15:57
  • 11
    The referrer is always empty when a page was not loaded by a link but by entering the URL into the address bar, or loading a bookmark. Such pages can sure have a history though, when the browser tab/window had loaded another page before! – ygoe Sep 19 '12 at 9:02
  • 1
    But is applicable solution for navigation across the multipage website – Dan Mar 26 '13 at 13:05
  • 37
    Does not work if a window was opened with target="_blank" to force a new window. The back button on the browser won't work, but there will be a document.referrer – Mike_K Mar 26 '13 at 15:54
  • 3
    This will not work if you are coming from a secure (HTTPS) page to an insecure page (HTTP), as that will strip the referrer. – Kevin Borders Apr 7 '15 at 15:31
59

My code let the browser go back one page, and if that fails it loads a fallback url. It also detect hashtags changes.

When the back button wasn't available, the fallback url will be loaded after 500 ms, so the browser has time enough to load the previous page. Loading the fallback url right after window.history.go(-1); would cause the browser to use the fallback url, because the js script didn't stop yet.

function historyBackWFallback(fallbackUrl) {
    fallbackUrl = fallbackUrl || '/';
    var prevPage = window.location.href;

    window.history.go(-1);

    setTimeout(function(){ 
        if (window.location.href == prevPage) {
            window.location.href = fallbackUrl; 
        }
    }, 500);
}
4
  • 7
    I think this really nails the heart of the question, the why a person cares and what can actually be done about it in a reliable manner and consistent. – Chris Marisic Apr 12 '16 at 14:22
  • 1
    This worked until I took the url where the back-button resides and pasted it in a new tab in chrome. Clicking on the back-button resulted in being sent to an empty tab. :( – karlingen Apr 4 '17 at 7:17
  • 4
    That's Chrome's default behaviour. You "visited" the page chrome://newtab and thus you can go back in history. – redelschaap Apr 4 '17 at 8:31
  • Careful with this because with a slow network connection you will hit the fallback url pretty regularly. – cameck Mar 23 '20 at 21:31
18

Here is how i did it.

I used the 'beforeunload' event to set a boolean. Then I set a timeout to watch if the 'beforeunload' fired.

var $window = $(window),
    $trigger = $('.select_your_link'),
    fallback = 'your_fallback_url';
    hasHistory = false;

$window.on('beforeunload', function(){
    hasHistory = true;
});

$trigger.on('click', function(){

    window.history.go(-1);

    setTimeout(function(){
        if (!hasHistory){
            window.location.href = fallback;
        }
    }, 200);

    return false;
});

Seems to work in major browsers (tested FF, Chrome, IE11 so far).

1
  • 2
    This is by far the best answer to the question. You can easily replace window.location.href = fallback with window.close() and it works too. – Vitani Feb 1 '17 at 10:17
17

There is a snippet I use in my projects:

function back(url) {
    if (history.length > 2) {
        // if history is not empty, go back:
        window.History.back();
    } else if (url) {
        // go to specified fallback url:
        window.History.replaceState(null, null, url);
    } else {
        // go home:
        window.History.replaceState(null, null, '/');
    }
}

FYI: I use History.js to manage browser history.


Why to compare history.length to number 2?

Because Chrome's startpage is counted as first item in the browser's history.


There are few possibilities of history.length and user's behaviour:

  • User opens new empty tab in the browser and then runs a page. history.length = 2 and we want to disable back() in this case, because user will go to empty tab.
  • User opens the page in new tab by clicking a link somewhere before. history.length = 1 and again we want to disable back() method.
  • And finally, user lands at current page after reloading few pages. history.length > 2 and now back() can be enabled.

Note: I omit case when user lands at current page after clicking link from external website without target="_blank".

Note 2: document.referrer is empty when you open website by typing its address and also when website uses ajax to load subpages, so I discontinued checking this value in the first case.

3
  • This approach worked great for me. I actually store static fallback back links for my pages that I use on the fallback. – Greg Blass Apr 28 '16 at 5:19
  • 1
    But, if you go back, the history.length won't change.. So, it doesn't work properly – Ciprian Mocanu May 9 '18 at 16:49
  • Your're right, unfortunately. I use this snippet with "one-step-back" structure only… – gregmatys May 11 '18 at 8:23
16

this seems to do the trick:

function goBackOrClose() {  

    window.history.back();
    window.close(); 

    //or if you are not interested in closing the window, do something else here
    //e.g. 
    theBrowserCantGoBack();

}

Call history.back() and then window.close(). If the browser is able to go back in history it won't be able to get to the next statement. If it's not able to go back, it'll close the window.

However, please note that if the page has been reached by typing a url, then firefox wont allow the script to close the window.

5
  • 4
    I've found this doesn't work unless I use a setTimeout with a delay of a few hundred milliseconds or so before trying to run the next statement, otherwise it'll run anyway after running history.back() – Ken Fehling Apr 27 '14 at 2:28
  • I haven't experienced that personally, which browser was it? – xtrahelp.com May 1 '14 at 17:21
  • 1
    I had worked fine with setTimeout function in below answer. ex: setTimeout(function() { window.close() }, 400); – gilchris Aug 11 '14 at 8:16
  • 2
    window.close() is considered a security risk by many modern browsers. Some just wont let you do it. – Rudi Kershaw Nov 23 '15 at 15:25
  • you can do anything after window.history.back(); window.close(); is just an example – hariszaman Jan 27 '20 at 14:53
12

Be careful with window.history.length because it includes also entries for window.history.forward()

So you may have maybe window.history.length with more than 1 entries, but no history back entries. This means that nothing happens if you fire window.history.back()

9

You can't directly check whether the back button is usable. You can look at history.length>0, but that will hold true if there are pages ahead of the current page as well. You can only be sure that the back button is unusable when history.length===0.

If that's not good enough, about all you can do is call history.back() and, if your page is still loaded afterwards, the back button is unavailable! Of course that means if the back button is available, you've just navigated away from the page. You aren't allowed to cancel the navigation in onunload, so about all you can do to stop the back actually happening is to return something from onbeforeunload, which will result in a big annoying prompt appearing. It's not worth it.

In fact it's normally a Really Bad Idea to be doing anything with the history. History navigation is for browser chrome, not web pages. Adding “go back” links typically causes more user confusion than it's worth.

3
  • 3
    regarding length - not even then in all browsers. Some browsers count the current page as a history item and start at 1. You'd have to include browser detection. – McAden Aug 27 '10 at 22:04
  • Actually I thought it was always 1! The 0 was a brainfart, I thought browsers would always respond with 1 or more. Turns out Opera and IE think otherwise—good catch. – bobince Aug 28 '10 at 0:21
  • 1
    "History navigation is for browser chrome, not web pages" - Agreed – Brian Mar 20 '15 at 17:27
5

history.length is useless as it does not show if user can go back in history. Also different browsers uses initial values 0 or 1 - it depends on browser.

The working solution is to use $(window).on('beforeunload' event, but I'm not sure that it will work if page is loaded via ajax and uses pushState to change window history.

So I've used next solution:

var currentUrl = window.location.href;
window.history.back();
setTimeout(function(){
    // if location was not changed in 100 ms, then there is no history back
    if(currentUrl === window.location.href){
        // redirect to site root
        window.location.href = '/';
    }
}, 100);
1
  • Works for me like this: function goBackOrTo(targetUrl){ var currentUrl = window.location.href; window.history.go(-1); setTimeout(function(){ // if location was not changed in 800 ms, then there is no history back if(currentUrl === window.location.href){ // redirect to site root window.location.href = targetUrl; } }, 800); } – alfonx Feb 27 '15 at 15:00
3

Building on the answer here and here. I think, the more conclusive answer is just to check if this is a new page in a new tab.

If the history of the page is more than one, then we can go back to the page previous to the current page. If not, the tab is a newly opened tab and we need to create a new tab.

Differently, to the answers linked, we are not checking for a referrer as a new tab will still have a referrer.

if(1 < history.length) {
    history.back();
}
else {
    window.close();
}
0
2

I came up with the following approach. It utilizes the onbeforeunload event to detect whether the browser starts leaving the page or not. If it does not in a certain timespan it'll just redirect to the fallback.

var goBack = function goBack(fallback){
    var useFallback = true;

    window.addEventListener("beforeunload", function(){
      useFallback = false;
    });

    window.history.back();

    setTimeout(function(){
        if (useFallback){ window.location.href = fallback; }
    }, 100); 
}

You can call this function using goBack("fallback.example.org").

1
  • 1
    I like this the most, I just changed windows.onbeforeunload to event listener window.addEventListener("beforeunload", function (event) { useFallback = false; }); so it doesn't overwrite window.onbeforeunload. – MiChAeLoKGB Jul 18 '17 at 14:28
1

There is another near perfect solution, taken from another SO answer:

if( (1 < history.length) && document.referrer ) {
    history.back();
}
else {
    // If you can't go back in history, you could perhaps close the window ?
    window.close();
}

Someone reported that it does not work when using target="_blank" but it seems to work for me on Chrome.

1

A solution that actually works

window.history.length == 1

This works on Chrome, Firefox, and Edge. You can use the following piece of JQuery code that worked for me on the latest versions of all of the above 3 browsers if you want to hide or remove a back button on your developed web page when there is no window history.

$(window).load(function() {
        if (window.history.length == 1) {
            $("#back-button").remove();
        }
    })
0

the browser has back and forward button. I come up a solution on this question. but It will affect browser forward action and cause bug with some browsers.

It works like that: If the browser open a new url, that has never opened, the history.length will be grow.

so you can change hash like

  location.href = '#__transfer__' + new Date().getTime() 

to get a never shown url, then history.length will get the true length.

  var realHistoryLength = history.length - 1

but, It not always work well, and I don't known why ,especially the when url auto jump quickly.

0

I was trying to find a solution and this is the best i could get (but works great and it's the easiest solution i've found even here).

In my case, i wanted to go back on history with an back button, but if the first page the user opened was an subpage of my app, it would go back to the main page.

The solution was, as soon the app is loaded, i just did an replace on the history state:

history.replaceState( {root: true}, '', window.location.pathname + window.location.hash)

This way, i just need to check history.state.root before go back. If true, i make an history replace instead:

if(history.state && history.state.root)
    history.replaceState( {root: true}, '', '/')
else
    history.back() 
1
  • I don't think there is other good use case. Maybe isn't an good idea If you want to check the history outside your app. – Maxwell s.c Jun 30 '20 at 13:36
-1
var fallbackUrl = "home.php";
if(history.back() === undefined)
    window.location.href = fallbackUrl;
2
  • this looks super easy?! is it tested on the various browsers? – benzkji Feb 25 '16 at 8:14
  • in Chrome history.back() is undefined only on empty tab page – gregmatys Apr 15 '16 at 10:27
-1

I am using a bit of PHP to achieve the result. It's a bit rusty though. But it should work.

<?php 
function pref(){ 
  return (isset($_SERVER['HTTP_REFERER'])) ? true : '';
}
?>
<html>
<body>

<input type="hidden" id="_pref" value="<?=pref()?>">

<button type="button" id="myButton">GoBack</button>

<!-- Include jquery library -->
<script> 
  if (!$('#_pref').val()) { 
    $('#myButton').hide() // or $('#myButton').remove()
  } 
</script>
</body>
</html>
0
-2

Solution

'use strict';
function previousPage() {
  if (window.location.pathname.split('/').filter(({ length }) => length > 0).length > 0) {
    window.history.back();
  }
}

Explaination

window.location.pathname will give you the current URI. For instance https://domain/question/1234/i-have-a-problem will give /question/1234/i-have-a-problem. See the documentation about window.location for more informations.

Next, the call to split() will give us all fragments of that URI. so if we take our previous URI, we will have something like ["", "question", "1234", "i-have-a-problem"]. See the documentation about String.prototype.split() for more informations.

The call to filter() is here to filter out the empty string generated by the backward slash. It will basically return only the fragment URI that have a length greater than 1 (non-empty string). So we would have something like ["question", "1234", "i-have-a-question"]. This could have been writen like so:

'use strict';
window.location.pathname.split('/').filter(function(fragment) {
  return fragment.length > 0;
});

See the documentation about Array.prototype.filter() and the Destructuring assignment for more informations.

Now, if the user tries to go back while being on https://domain/, we wont trigger the if-statement, and so wont trigger the window.history.back() method so the user will stay in our website. This URL will be equivalent to [] which has a length of 0, and 0 > 0 is false. Hence, silently failing. Of course, you can log something or have another action if you want.

'use strict';
function previousPage() {
  if (window.location.pathname.split('/').filter(({ length }) => length > 0).length > 0) {
    window.history.back();
  } else {
    alert('You cannot go back any further...');
  }
}

Limitations

Of course, this solution wont work if the browser do not support the History API. Check the documentation to know more about it before using this solution.

-5

I'm not sure if this works and it is completely untested, but try this:

<script type="text/javascript">

    function goBack() {
        history.back();
    }

    if (history.length > 0) { //if there is a history...
        document.getElementsByTagName('button')[].onclick="goBack()"; //assign function "goBack()" to all buttons onClick
    } else {
        die();
    }
</script>

And somewhere in HTML:

<button value="Button1"> //These buttons have no action
<button value="Button2">

EDIT:

What you can also do is to research what browsers support the back function (I think they all do) and use the standard JavaScript browser detection object found, and described thoroughly, on this page. Then you can have 2 different pages: one for the "good browsers" compatible with the back button and one for the "bad browsers" telling them to go update their browser

2
  • 2
    history.back is a function. You want to check if history.length > 0 then if it is go back with history.back() – pixl coder Aug 27 '10 at 21:49
  • 3
    Also [] on a NodeList makes no sense, and you can't assign a string to an event handler. – bobince Aug 27 '10 at 21:57
-8

Check if window.history.length is equal to 0.

2
  • 6
    Not a good way, since history.length does not tell you where you are in the history... – Ron Reiter Oct 4 '11 at 16:43
  • @Ron Reiter: Yes, I think the top answer and other comments for this question had already established that over a year ago... – Cristian Sanchez Oct 6 '11 at 16:19

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