166

I have two separately unique columns in a table: col1, col2. Both have a unique index (col1 is unique and so is col2).

I need INSERT ... ON CONFLICT ... DO UPDATE syntax, and update other columns in case of a conflict, but I can't use both columns as conflict_target.

It works:

INSERT INTO table
...
ON CONFLICT ( col1 ) 
DO UPDATE 
SET 
-- update needed columns here

But how to do this for several columns, something like this:

...
ON CONFLICT ( col1, col2 )
DO UPDATE 
SET 
....

Currently using Postgres 9.5.

2
  • 5
    "col1, col2, they both are unique indexed." does that mean col1 is unique and col2 is unique or are combinations of col1,col2 unique?
    – e4c5
    Jun 27, 2016 at 4:54
  • 3
    does that mean col1 is unique and col2 is unique, individually Jun 27, 2016 at 17:19

13 Answers 13

126
+50

ON CONFLICT requires a unique index* to do the conflict detection. So you just need to create a unique index on both columns:

t=# create table t (id integer, a text, b text);
CREATE TABLE
t=# create unique index idx_t_id_a on t (id, a);
CREATE INDEX
t=# insert into t values (1, 'a', 'foo');
INSERT 0 1
t=# insert into t values (1, 'a', 'bar') on conflict (id, a) do update set b = 'bar';
INSERT 0 1
t=# select * from t;
 id | a |  b  
----+---+-----
  1 | a | bar

* In addition to unique indexes, you can also use exclusion constraints. These are a bit more general than unique constraints. Suppose your table had columns for id and valid_time (and valid_time is a tsrange), and you wanted to allow duplicate ids, but not for overlapping time periods. A unique constraint won't help you, but with an exclusion constraint you can say "exclude new records if their id equals an old id and also their valid_time overlaps its valid_time."

10
  • 15
    What this creates is a together unique index create unique index idx_t_id_a on t (id, a); Of course the OP doesn't state clearly whether the two columns are unique individually or together.
    – e4c5
    Jun 27, 2016 at 4:53
  • Why postgres sometimes says there is no column named after the index and fails to use ON CONFLICT ?
    – Pak
    Dec 20, 2016 at 18:03
  • @Pak it sounds like you should write your own question with the specific command you're using and the error message you receive. Dec 20, 2016 at 21:08
  • 2
    -1: doesn't answer the question and ON CONFLICT DO UPDATE not supported with exclusion constraints is the error you'll get if you try to use an exclusion constraint here. Oct 8, 2021 at 19:28
  • 3
    The OP clearly states that both columns are independently unique: col1 is unique and so is col2. Your answer provides no solution for this.
    – cdonner
    Nov 13, 2023 at 21:09
83

A sample table and data

CREATE TABLE dupes(col1 int primary key, col2 int, col3 text,
   CONSTRAINT col2_unique UNIQUE (col2)
);

INSERT INTO dupes values(1,1,'a'),(2,2,'b');

Reproducing the problem

INSERT INTO dupes values(3,2,'c')
ON CONFLICT (col1) DO UPDATE SET col3 = 'c', col2 = 2

Let's call this Q1. The result is

ERROR:  duplicate key value violates unique constraint "col2_unique"
DETAIL:  Key (col2)=(2) already exists.

What the documentation says

conflict_target can perform unique index inference. When performing inference, it consists of one or more index_column_name columns and/or index_expression expressions, and an optional index_predicate. All table_name unique indexes that, without regard to order, contain exactly the conflict_target-specified columns/expressions are inferred (chosen) as arbiter indexes. If an index_predicate is specified, it must, as a further requirement for inference, satisfy arbiter indexes.

This gives the impression that the following query should work, but it does not because it would actually require a together unique index on col1 and col2. However such an index would not guarantee that col1 and col2 would be unique individually which is one of the OP's requirements.

INSERT INTO dupes values(3,2,'c') 
ON CONFLICT (col1,col2) DO UPDATE SET col3 = 'c', col2 = 2

Let's call this query Q2 (this fails with a syntax error)

Why?

Postgresql behaves this way is because what should happen when a conflict occurs on the second column is not well defined. There are number of possibilities. For example in the above Q1 query, should postgresql update col1 when there is a conflict on col2? But what if that leads to another conflict on col1? how is postgresql expected to handle that?

A solution

A solution is to combine ON CONFLICT with old fashioned UPSERT.

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION merge_db(key1 INT, key2 INT, data TEXT) RETURNS VOID AS
$$
BEGIN
    LOOP
        -- first try to update the key
        UPDATE dupes SET col3 = data WHERE col1 = key1 and col2 = key2;
        IF found THEN
            RETURN;
        END IF;

        -- not there, so try to insert the key
        -- if someone else inserts the same key concurrently, or key2
        -- already exists in col2,
        -- we could get a unique-key failure
        BEGIN
            INSERT INTO dupes VALUES (key1, key2, data) ON CONFLICT (col1) DO UPDATE SET col3 = data;
            RETURN;
        EXCEPTION WHEN unique_violation THEN
            BEGIN
                INSERT INTO dupes VALUES (key1, key2, data) ON CONFLICT (col2) DO UPDATE SET col3 = data;
                RETURN;
            EXCEPTION WHEN unique_violation THEN
                -- Do nothing, and loop to try the UPDATE again.
            END;
        END;
    END LOOP;
END;
$$
LANGUAGE plpgsql;

You would need to modify the logic of this stored function so that it updates the columns exactly the way you want it to. Invoke it like

SELECT merge_db(3,2,'c');
SELECT merge_db(1,2,'d');
6
  • 4
    This is way works but a bit more work/logic than is necessary, all you have to do really is create a unique constraint on the two columns. See my answer below.
    – Zia
    Aug 18, 2016 at 4:02
  • can I use merge_db solution also if I am inserting multiple sets of VALUES at once?
    – daniyel
    Dec 6, 2016 at 11:42
  • 4
    It is unclear to me how it's useful to suggest using the old-fashioned upsert - this question is well referenced for "postgres upsert 9.5" and it could be better by explaining how to use it with all constraint_names options.
    – Pak
    Dec 20, 2016 at 18:02
  • 9
    @Pak It is unclear to you because you have not read the question clearly. The op is not looking for a composite key on those fields. The other answer works for composite keys
    – e4c5
    Dec 20, 2016 at 23:58
  • 1
    Thanks for answering the question as written.
    – spro
    Apr 17, 2021 at 21:07
10

In nowadays is (seems) impossible. Neither the last version of the ON CONFLICT syntax permits to repeat the clause, nor with CTE is possible: not is possible to breack the INSERT from ON CONFLICT to add more conflict-targets.

4

If you are using postgres 9.5 or later, you can use the EXCLUDED space.

Example taken from What's new in PostgreSQL 9.5:

INSERT INTO user_logins (username, logins)
VALUES ('Naomi',1),('James',1)
ON CONFLICT (username)
DO UPDATE SET logins = user_logins.logins + EXCLUDED.logins;
2
2
ON CONFLICT ( col1, col2 )
DO UPDATE 
SET 

works fine. but you should not update col1, col2 in the SET section.

1
1

It seems to be the case that for the OP col1 and col2 are independently unique. So that a combined unique constrained will NOT solve the insert/on conflict problem, as suggested in other answers.

One solution to this is a CTE which firstly only inserts a new row with col1 set and assigns a random value for col2 (avoiding a constraint violation on col2). And only then it updates col2 to its final value. Now this is what happens:

  1. If col1 is duplicated, the first clause's conflict will hit and not insert a new row. Otherwise a new row is inserted with col1 set to its final value and col2 set to a temporary and unique value.
  2. If col2 is duplicated, the second clause's conflict will hit and simply store the final value of :col2. Either for the existing row or for the newly created row from the insert clause.

Given that col1 and col2 are both strings/texts, we can use gen_random_uuid()::text to generate a unique string for the first insert clause:

with
    row as (
        insert into table(col1, col2)
        values(:col1, gen_random_uuid()::text)
        on conflict(col1) do set col1 = :col1
        returning col1
    )
update table
set col2 = :col2
from row
where row.col1 = :col1
returning col1, col2

with :col1 and :col2 being variables passed to the query.

Now if your column isn't a string/text you can come up with other unique values such as temporarily assigning -1 to col2, knowing that all your values are otherwise positive.

For when you have more than 2 independently unique columns, above approach scales in so far as you can move more (and even all) column updates into the CTE clause:

with
    row as (
        insert into table(col1, col2, ..., colN)
        values(
            :col1,
            gen_random_uuid()::text,
            ...
            gen_random_uuid()::text,
        )
        on conflict(col1) do set col1 = :col1
        returning col1
    ),
    col2_update as (
        update table
        set col2 = :col2
        from row
        where row.col1 = :col1
    ),
    ...
    colN_update as (
        update table
        set colN = :colN
        from row
        where row.col1 = :col1
    )
select col1, col2, ..., colN from row
1
  • While it is certainly a solution and it is helpful, this feels like a workaround. Why would we want to insert random values in our query just to avoid postgres from throwing ? There must be a way here...
    – Rose
    Feb 14 at 5:34
1

Clean solution

This achieves what the question asks for:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION f_upsert_double(_uniq1 int, _uniq2 int, _val text)
  RETURNS void 
  LANGUAGE plpgsql AS
$func$
BEGIN
   LOOP
      -- covers **all** unique violations
      INSERT INTO double_uniq
             ( uniq1,  uniq2,  val) 
      VALUES (_uniq1, _uniq2, _val) 
      ON     CONFLICT DO NOTHING;

      EXIT WHEN FOUND;

      -- updating *two* rows is a corner case possibility!
      -- take care to cover **all** possible unique violations
      UPDATE double_uniq
      SET    val = _val
      WHERE  uniq1 = _uniq1
      OR     uniq2 = _uniq2;

      EXIT WHEN FOUND;
   END LOOP;
END
$func$;

Call:

SELECT f_upsert_double(1, 2, 'foo');

fiddle

Can easily be adapted to return a resulting ID or whatever.

Works for single-row UPSERT.

It handles all race conditions that could develop with concurrent writes around the two UNIQUE constraints gracefully. The loop guarantees that either INSERT or UPDATE succeeds eventually. In reality, the function will hardly ever loop at all.
Here is a discussion and a step-by-step explanation why the loop is necessary:

Never raises an exception for either UNIQUE constraint, so no need for an EXCEPTION clause. That's important because an EXCEPTION clause in a PL/pgSQL code block butchers performance and results in problems like this one:

So it's also as cheap as it gets.

Note: address all possible unique violations in the UPDATE (from all PRIMARY KEY, UNIQUE and EXCLUDE constraints), or you can get an endless loop!

Related:

Dirty problem

That said, in most cases you should not have to do this to begin with. It's a questionable DB design and workflow.
Typically, the situation arises when only one of (col1, col2) can have a value, while the other one must be null. Then there is a clean solution with two mutually exclusive partial unique indexes.

Or, better yet, merge the two UNIQUE constraints into one using the NULLS NOT DISTINCT in Postgres 15 or later. See:

Related:

0

Vlad got the right idea.

First you have to create a table unique constraint on the columns col1, col2 Then once you do that you can do the following:

INSERT INTO dupes values(3,2,'c') 
ON CONFLICT ON CONSTRAINT dupes_pkey 
DO UPDATE SET col3 = 'c', col2 = 2
1
  • 26
    Sorry but you have misunderstand the question. The OP doesn't want a together unique constraint.
    – e4c5
    Aug 18, 2016 at 5:12
0

You can typically (I would think) generate a statement with only one on conflict that specifies the one and only constraint that is of relevance, for the thing you are inserting.

Because typically, only one constraint is the "relevant" one, at a time. (If many, then I'm wondering if something is weird / oddly-designed, hmm.)

Example:
(License: Not CC0, only CC-By)

// there're these unique constraints:
//   unique (site_id, people_id, page_id)
//   unique (site_id, people_id, pages_in_whole_site)
//   unique (site_id, people_id, pages_in_category_id)
// and only *one* of page-id, category-id, whole-site-true/false
// can be specified. So only one constraint is "active", at a time.

val thingColumnName = thingColumnName(notfificationPreference)

val insertStatement = s"""
  insert into page_notf_prefs (
    site_id,
    people_id,
    notf_level,
    page_id,
    pages_in_whole_site,
    pages_in_category_id)
  values (?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?)
  -- There can be only one on-conflict clause.
  on conflict (site_id, people_id, $thingColumnName)   <—— look
  do update set
    notf_level = excluded.notf_level
  """

val values = List(
  siteId.asAnyRef,
  notfPref.peopleId.asAnyRef,
  notfPref.notfLevel.toInt.asAnyRef,
  // Only one of these is non-null:
  notfPref.pageId.orNullVarchar,
  if (notfPref.wholeSite) true.asAnyRef else NullBoolean,
  notfPref.pagesInCategoryId.orNullInt)

runUpdateSingleRow(insertStatement, values)

And:

private def thingColumnName(notfPref: PageNotfPref): String =
  if (notfPref.pageId.isDefined)
    "page_id"
  else if (notfPref.pagesInCategoryId.isDefined)
    "pages_in_category_id"
  else if (notfPref.wholeSite)
    "pages_in_whole_site"
  else
    die("TyE2ABK057")

The on conflict clause is dynamically generated, depending on what I'm trying to do. If I'm inserting a notification preference, for a page — then there can be a unique conflict, on the site_id, people_id, page_id constraint. And if I'm configuring notification prefs, for a category — then instead I know that the constraint that can get violated, is site_id, people_id, category_id.

So I can, and fairly likely you too, in your case?, generate the correct on conflict (... columns ), because I know what I want to do, and then I know which single one of the many unique constraints, is the one that can get violated.

-1
  1. Create a constraint (foreign index, for example).

OR/AND

  1. Look at existing constraints (\d in psq).
  2. Use ON CONSTRAINT(constraint_name) in the INSERT clause.
-1

Kind of hacky but I solved this by concatenating the two values from col1 and col2 into a new column, col3 (kind of like an index of the two) and compared against that. This only works if you need it to match BOTH col1 and col2.

INSERT INTO table
...
ON CONFLICT ( col3 ) 
DO UPDATE 
SET 
-- update needed columns here

Where col3 = the concatenation of the values from col1 and col2.

2
  • 4
    you can create a unique index for those two columns and give that constraint in on conflict. Feb 13, 2019 at 2:34
  • @KishoreRelangi What if they do not have a unique index rather a normal index? Aug 29, 2021 at 16:10
-1

I get I am late to the party but for the people looking for answers I found this: here

INSERT INTO tbl_Employee 
VALUES (6,'Noor')
ON CONFLICT (EmpID,EmpName)
DO NOTHING;
1
  • 3
    Ben, this is unfortunately wrong because you have omitted that the user needs to add a constraint on the EmpId and EmpNAme columns. Apr 6, 2021 at 10:09
-8

ON CONFLICT is very clumsy solution, run

UPDATE dupes SET key1=$1, key2=$2 where key3=$3    
if rowcount > 0    
  INSERT dupes (key1, key2, key3) values ($1,$2,$3);

works on Oracle, Postgres and all other database

2
  • 5
    It's not atomic, so it could fail and produce wrong results in case of multiple connections at the same time. Jan 19, 2020 at 19:40
  • Didn't you mean rowcount <= 0? (i.e. do the insert if the update failed) Jun 14, 2022 at 19:11

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