7

I'm using logging module, and I've passed in the same parameters that I have on other jobs that are currently working:

import logging
from inst_config import config3

logging.basicConfig(
    level=logging.INFO,
    format='%(asctime)s [%(levelname)s] - %(message)s',
    filename=config3.GET_LOGFILE(config3.REQUESTS_USAGE_LOGFILE))
logging.warning('This should go in the file.')

if __name__ == '__main__':
    logging.info('Starting unload.')

Using this method to create the filename:

REQUESTS_USAGE_LOGFILE = r'C:\RunLogs\Requests_Usage\requests_usage_runlog_{}.txt'.format(
        CUR_MONTH)
def GET_LOGFILE(logfile):
    """Truncates file and returns."""
    with open(logfile, 'w'):
        pass
    return logfile

When I run it, however, it is creating the file, and then still outputting the logging info to the console. I'm running in Powershell.

Just tried putting it inside the main statement like this:

if __name__ == '__main__':
    logging.basicConfig(
    level=logging.INFO,
    format='%(asctime)s [%(levelname)s] - %(message)s',
    filename=config3.GET_LOGFILE(config3.REQUESTS_USAGE_LOGFILE))

    logging.warning('This should go in the file.')

Still no luck.

  • can you show us the code you're usign to write to the log file? – dot.Py Mar 9 '16 at 17:17
  • 1
    Have you created the log file before the if __name__ == '__main__': runs? I mean... if you run your program, it'll know where's the log file? Can you make a test by putting the logging.basicConfig() and creating the log file inside the if __name__ == '__main__': block? – dot.Py Mar 9 '16 at 17:28
  • 1
    Sure I'll try that. EDIT: I placed it inside the main statement, and still printing to the console:/ – flybonzai Mar 9 '16 at 17:29
5

Can you try run this in your main file:

import logging 
logging.basicConfig(
    level=logging.INFO, 
    format='%(asctime)s [%(levelname)s] - %(message)s',
    filename='filename.txt')  # pass explicit filename here 
logger = logging.get_logger()  # get the root logger
logger.warning('This should go in the file.')
print logger.handlers   # you should have one FileHandler object
| improve this answer | |
  • I didn't include my imports, but it is indeed loaded at the top of the file. I've added my imports to the OP. – flybonzai Mar 9 '16 at 17:32
  • Still didn't work. It's not creating the file since it's never writing to it. Could the problem be powershell? The weird thing is I have other jobs with the exact same configuration that run without a hitch. – flybonzai Mar 9 '16 at 17:42
  • 1
    You say here that it's not creating the file, but in the main post you say When I run it, however, it is creating the file. Which is it? – John Gordon Mar 9 '16 at 18:15
  • That led me to the solution @Forge, for some reason it defaulted to a streaming handler this time around, so I added a fileHandler. – flybonzai Mar 9 '16 at 20:16
15

I add the following lines before the logging.basicConfig() and it worked for me.

for handler in logging.root.handlers[:]:
    logging.root.removeHandler(handler)
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    This tip helped me immensely. – Maggie S. Nov 16 '18 at 2:17
  • 1
    sheeze ... yes this works. (wasted 1 hour trying to fix this!) – P Moran May 29 '19 at 18:41
  • @yue dong - Can you explain why this solved the problem (p.s. - it solved for me as well) ? – Guy Avraham Sep 12 '19 at 7:19
  • @yue dong, I'm second. Could you explain, why removing handlers from root logger helps? – wl2776 May 14 at 13:35
  • BUT WHY THIS WORK? – fatih_dur Aug 1 at 9:24
0

If you are using 'root' logger which is by default has name "", than you can do this trick:

logging.getLogger().setLevel(logging.INFO)    
logger = logging.getLogger('')
logger.handlers = []

In addition you may want to specify logging level as in code above, this level will persist for all descendant loggers.

If instead, you specified particular logger, than do

logger = logging.getLogger('my_service')
logger.handlers = []
fh = logging.FileHandler(log_path)
fh.setLevel(logging.INFO)
# create console handler
ch = logging.StreamHandler()
ch.setLevel(logging.INFO)
logger.addHandler(fh)
logger.addHandler(ch)
logger.info('service started')

The above code will create new logger 'my_service'. In case that logger has been already created it clears all handles. That it adds handles for writing in specified file and console. See official documentation as well.

You can also use hierarchical loggers. It is done directly.

logger = logging.getLogger('my_service.update')
logger.info('updated successfully')
| improve this answer | |

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