98

I haven't seen any examples that do this. Is this not allowed in the API spec?

I am searching for an easy drag-drop solution for uploading an entire folder tree of photos.

2

11 Answers 11

87

It's now possible, thanks to Chrome >= 21.

function traverseFileTree(item, path) {
  path = path || "";
  if (item.isFile) {
    // Get file
    item.file(function(file) {
      console.log("File:", path + file.name);
    });
  } else if (item.isDirectory) {
    // Get folder contents
    var dirReader = item.createReader();
    dirReader.readEntries(function(entries) {
      for (var i=0; i<entries.length; i++) {
        traverseFileTree(entries[i], path + item.name + "/");
      }
    });
  }
}

dropArea.addEventListener("drop", function(event) {
  event.preventDefault();

  var items = event.dataTransfer.items;
  for (var i=0; i<items.length; i++) {
    // webkitGetAsEntry is where the magic happens
    var item = items[i].webkitGetAsEntry();
    if (item) {
      traverseFileTree(item);
    }
  }
}, false);

More info: https://protonet.info/blog/html5-experiment-drag-drop-of-folders/

11
  • 9
    Even 2 years later, IE and Firefox don't seem to be willing to implement this. Jul 3, 2014 at 9:09
  • 9
    Now, for Firefox as well: stackoverflow.com/a/33431704/195216 It shows folder uploading via drag'n'drop and via dialog in chrome and firefox!
    – dforce
    Nov 5, 2015 at 7:42
  • 2
    Edge supports this too.
    – ZachB
    Dec 9, 2016 at 22:52
  • 9
    Important warning: The code in this answer is limited to 100 files in a given directory. See here : bugs.chromium.org/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=514087
    – johnozbay
    Mar 2, 2018 at 6:26
  • 5
    @johnozbay it's unfortunate that more people picked up your important warning, and it's not necessarily a Chromium issue since the spec says readEntries won't return all the entires in a directory. Based on the bug link your provided, I've written up a complete answer: stackoverflow.com/a/53058574/885922
    – xlm
    Oct 30, 2018 at 23:42
79

Unfortunately none of the existing answers are completely correct because readEntries will not necessarily return ALL the (file or directory) entries for a given directory. This is part of the API specification (see Documentation section below).

To actually get all the files, we'll need to call readEntries repeatedly (for each directory we encounter) until it returns an empty array. If we don't, we will miss some files/sub-directories in a directory e.g. in Chrome, readEntries will only return at most 100 entries at a time.

Using Promises (await/ async) to more clearly demonstrate the correct usage of readEntries (since it's asynchronous), and breadth-first search (BFS) to traverse the directory structure:

// Drop handler function to get all files
async function getAllFileEntries(dataTransferItemList) {
  let fileEntries = [];
  // Use BFS to traverse entire directory/file structure
  let queue = [];
  // Unfortunately dataTransferItemList is not iterable i.e. no forEach
  for (let i = 0; i < dataTransferItemList.length; i++) {
    // Note webkitGetAsEntry a non-standard feature and may change
    // Usage is necessary for handling directories
    queue.push(dataTransferItemList[i].webkitGetAsEntry());
  }
  while (queue.length > 0) {
    let entry = queue.shift();
    if (entry.isFile) {
      fileEntries.push(entry);
    } else if (entry.isDirectory) {
      queue.push(...await readAllDirectoryEntries(entry.createReader()));
    }
  }
  return fileEntries;
}

// Get all the entries (files or sub-directories) in a directory 
// by calling readEntries until it returns empty array
async function readAllDirectoryEntries(directoryReader) {
  let entries = [];
  let readEntries = await readEntriesPromise(directoryReader);
  while (readEntries.length > 0) {
    entries.push(...readEntries);
    readEntries = await readEntriesPromise(directoryReader);
  }
  return entries;
}

// Wrap readEntries in a promise to make working with readEntries easier
// readEntries will return only some of the entries in a directory
// e.g. Chrome returns at most 100 entries at a time
async function readEntriesPromise(directoryReader) {
  try {
    return await new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
      directoryReader.readEntries(resolve, reject);
    });
  } catch (err) {
    console.log(err);
  }
}

Complete working example on Codepen: https://codepen.io/pen/QWmvxwV

FWIW I only picked this up because I wasn't getting back all the files I expected in a directory containing 40,000 files (many directories containing well over 100 files/sub-directories) when using the accepted answer.

Documentation:

This behaviour is documented in FileSystemDirectoryReader. Excerpt with emphasis added:

readEntries()
Returns a an array containing some number of the directory's entries. Each item in the array is an object based on FileSystemEntry—typically either FileSystemFileEntry or FileSystemDirectoryEntry.

But to be fair, the MDN documentation could make this clearer in other sections. The readEntries() documentation simply notes:

readEntries() method retrieves the directory entries within the directory being read and delivers them in an array to the provided callback function

And the only mention/hint that multiple calls are needed is in the description of successCallback parameter:

If there are no files left, or you've already called readEntries() on this FileSystemDirectoryReader, the array is empty.

Arguably the API could be more intuitive as well.

It's also worth noting that DataTransferItem.webkitGetAsEntry() is a non-standard feature and may change e.g. renamed getAsEntry(). Its usage is necessary to handle uploading files nested within directories.

Related:

  • johnozbay comments that on Chrome, readEntries will return at most 100 entries for a directory (verified as of Chrome 64).
  • Xan explains the correct usage of readEntries quite well in this answer (albeit without code).
  • Pablo Barría Urenda's answer correctly calls readEntries in a asynchronous manner without BFS. He also notes that Firefox returns all the entries in a directory (unlike Chrome) but we can't rely on this given the specification.
13
  • 5
    Thanks a lot for the shout-out, and getting this content out there. SOF needs more fantastic members like yourself! ✌🏻
    – johnozbay
    Nov 1, 2018 at 10:48
  • 6
    I appreciate that @johnozbay I'm just concerned that it seems that many users are overlooking this small but significant fact re: specification/API and this edge case (100+ files in a directory) isn't that unlikely. I only realised it when I wasn't getting back all the files I expected. Your comment should have been answer.
    – xlm
    Nov 2, 2018 at 2:43
  • 1
    To get all relevant metadata (size, lastModified, mime type), you need to convert all FileSystemFileEntry to File, via the file(successCb, failureCb) method. If you also need the full path, you should take that from fileEntry.fullPath (file.webkitRelativePath will be just the name). Feb 9, 2020 at 8:37
  • 1
    @Andrey the main issue is that the File object does not enable us to readily handle the case where we have a directory and wish to get its files or sub-directories. This is the reason why we call dataTransferItemList[i].webkitGetAsEntry() instead of dataTransferItemList[i].getAsFile()
    – xlm
    May 5, 2021 at 1:46
  • 1
    Converting to File doesn't appear to be intensive so I wouldn't worry about that operation. I've got this code in production and it easily handles tens of thousands of files. In fact my test harness was 40,000 files arbitrarily nested. Uploading of the content itself will of course depend on file size, disk, network etc.
    – xlm
    May 5, 2021 at 15:12
23

This function will give you a promise for array of all dropped files, like <input type="file"/>.files:

function getFilesWebkitDataTransferItems(dataTransferItems) {
  function traverseFileTreePromise(item, path='') {
    return new Promise( resolve => {
      if (item.isFile) {
        item.file(file => {
          file.filepath = path + file.name //save full path
          files.push(file)
          resolve(file)
        })
      } else if (item.isDirectory) {
        let dirReader = item.createReader()
        dirReader.readEntries(entries => {
          let entriesPromises = []
          for (let entr of entries)
            entriesPromises.push(traverseFileTreePromise(entr, path + item.name + "/"))
          resolve(Promise.all(entriesPromises))
        })
      }
    })
  }

  let files = []
  return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    let entriesPromises = []
    for (let it of dataTransferItems)
      entriesPromises.push(traverseFileTreePromise(it.webkitGetAsEntry()))
    Promise.all(entriesPromises)
      .then(entries => {
        //console.log(entries)
        resolve(files)
      })
  })
}

Usage:

dropArea.addEventListener("drop", function(event) {
  event.preventDefault();

  var items = event.dataTransfer.items;
  getFilesFromWebkitDataTransferItems(items)
    .then(files => {
      ...
    })
}, false);

NPM package: https://www.npmjs.com/package/datatransfer-files-promise

Usage example: https://github.com/grabantot/datatransfer-files-promise/blob/master/index.html

5
  • 4
    This should be the new accepted answer. It is better than other answers because it returns a promise when complete. But there were a few mistakes: function getFilesWebkitDataTransferItems(dataTransfer) should be function getFilesWebkitDataTransferItems(items), and for (entr of entries) should be for (let entr of entries).
    – RoccoB
    Sep 3, 2017 at 3:47
  • 2
    Won't actually get all the files in a directory (for Chrome it will only return 100 entries in a directory). Spec stipulates the need to call readEntries repeatedly until it returns an empty array.
    – xlm
    Oct 30, 2018 at 23:28
  • @xlm Updated npm package. Now it handles >100 entries.
    – grabantot
    Nov 15, 2018 at 16:01
  • Very helpful! Thanks for the solution. So far this is the most precise and clean one. This should be new accepted answer, I agree. Jul 13, 2020 at 8:45
  • This is perfect! Thanks thanks thanks! Dec 26, 2021 at 16:54
14

In this message to the HTML 5 mailing list Ian Hickson says:

HTML5 now has to upload many files at once. Browsers could allow users to pick multiple files at once, including across multiple directories; that's a bit out of scope of the spec.

(Also see the original feature proposal.) So it's safe to assume he considers uploading folders using drag-and-drop also out of scope. Apparently it's up to the browser to serve individual files.

Uploading folders would also have some other difficulties, as described by Lars Gunther:

This […] proposal must have two checks (if it is doable at all):

  1. Max size, to stop someone from uploading a full directory of several hundred uncompressed raw images...

  2. Filtering even if the accept attribute is omitted. Mac OS metadata and Windows thumbnails, etc should be omitted. All hidden files and directories should default to be excluded.

2
  • Hmmm, I agree on point 2... but only as long as there is a way for the web developer to determine if they want to enable the upload of hidden files - as there is always the potential that a hidden file could be operative to the use of the uploaded folder. Especially if the folder is a full on document split into multiple parts like a final cut file might be.
    – CJT3
    Aug 6, 2014 at 14:57
  • Disagree with out of scope: this is a cause of incompatibilities for something many people want to do, so it should be specified. Aug 23, 2014 at 18:50
10

Now you can upload directories with both drag and drop and input.

<input type='file' webkitdirectory >

and for drag and drop(For webkit browsers).

Handling drag and drop folders.

<div id="dropzone"></div>
<script>
var dropzone = document.getElementById('dropzone');
dropzone.ondrop = function(e) {
  var length = e.dataTransfer.items.length;
  for (var i = 0; i < length; i++) {
    var entry = e.dataTransfer.items[i].webkitGetAsEntry();
    if (entry.isFile) {
      ... // do whatever you want
    } else if (entry.isDirectory) {
      ... // do whatever you want
    }
  }
};
</script>

Resources:

http://updates.html5rocks.com/2012/07/Drag-and-drop-a-folder-onto-Chrome-now-available

1
  • 1
    Is it possible to do the same for downloading without using compressed folders ? Aug 28, 2015 at 9:38
8

Firefox now supports folder upload, as of November 15, 2016, in v50.0: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/Firefox/Releases/50#Files_and_directories

You can drag and drop folders into Firefox or you can browse and select a local folder to upload. It also supports folders nested in subfolders.

That means you can now use either Chrome, Firefox, Edge or Opera to upload folders. You can't use Safari or Internet Explorer at present.

3

Here's a complete example of how to use the file and directory entries API:

var dropzone = document.getElementById("dropzone");
var listing = document.getElementById("listing");

function scanAndLogFiles(item, container) {
  var elem = document.createElement("li");
  elem.innerHTML = item.name;
  container.appendChild(elem);

  if (item.isDirectory) {
    var directoryReader = item.createReader();
    var directoryContainer = document.createElement("ul");
    container.appendChild(directoryContainer);

    directoryReader.readEntries(function(entries) {
      entries.forEach(function(entry) {
        scanAndLogFiles(entry, directoryContainer);
      });
    });
  }
}

dropzone.addEventListener(
  "dragover",
  function(event) {
    event.preventDefault();
  },
  false
);

dropzone.addEventListener(
  "drop",
  function(event) {
    var items = event.dataTransfer.items;

    event.preventDefault();
    listing.innerHTML = "";

    for (var i = 0; i < items.length; i++) {
      var item = items[i].webkitGetAsEntry();

      if (item) {
        scanAndLogFiles(item, listing);
      }
    }
  },
  false
);
body {
  font: 14px "Arial", sans-serif;
}

#dropzone {
  text-align: center;
  width: 300px;
  height: 100px;
  margin: 10px;
  padding: 10px;
  border: 4px dashed red;
  border-radius: 10px;
}

#boxtitle {
  display: table-cell;
  vertical-align: middle;
  text-align: center;
  color: black;
  font: bold 2em "Arial", sans-serif;
  width: 300px;
  height: 100px;
}
<p>Drag files and/or directories to the box below!</p>

<div id="dropzone">
  <div id="boxtitle">
    Drop Files Here
  </div>
</div>

<h2>Directory tree:</h2>

<ul id="listing"></ul>

webkitGetAsEntry is supported by Chrome 13+, Firefox 50+ and Edge.

Source: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/DataTransferItem/webkitGetAsEntry

1
1

Does HTML5 allow drag-drop upload of folders or a folder tree?

Only Chrome supports this feature. It has failed to have any traction and is likely to be removed.

Ref : https://developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/Web/API/DirectoryReader#readEntries

4
  • Wow. Telling from the W3C Note at that link, this is indeed not continued. What is the basis of the assumption that it has failed to get any traction?
    – bebbi
    Feb 29, 2016 at 12:58
  • @bebbi no other browser vendors implemented it
    – basarat
    Feb 29, 2016 at 23:23
  • 1
    @PabloBarríaUrenda comment is not true; his issue is likely referring to his question: stackoverflow.com/questions/51850469/… which he solved/realised readEntries can't be called if another call of readEntries is still being run. The DirectoryReader API design isn't the best
    – xlm
    Oct 30, 2018 at 23:37
  • @xlm yes, indeed you are correct. I had posted this while I myself was puzzled by the issue, but I eventually resolved it (and forgot about this comment). I have now deleted the confusing comment. Oct 31, 2018 at 7:42
1

UPDATE: Since 2012 a lot has changed, see answers above instead. I leave this answer here for the sake of archeology.

The HTML5 spec does NOT say that when selecting a folder for upload, the browser should upload all contained files recursively.

Actually, in Chrome/Chromium, you can upload a folder, but when you do it, it just uploads a meaningless 4KB file, which represents the directory. Some servers-side applications like Alfresco can detect this, and warn the user that folders can not be uploaded:

The following cannot be uploaded because they are either folders or are zero bytes in size: undefined

1
  • @MoB: maybe it is some kind of pointer indeed. But since the actual file is on the client machine, the server machine will not be able to do anything with this pointer, of course. Aug 6, 2012 at 10:37
1

Recently stumbled upon the need to implement this in two of my projects so I created a bunch of utility functions to help with this.

One creates a data-structure representing all the folders, files and relationship between them, like so 👇

{
  folders: [
    {
      name: string,
      folders: Array,
      files: Array
    },
    /* ... */
  ],
  files: Array
}

While the other just returns an Array of all the files (in all folders and sub-folders).

Here's the link to the package: https://www.npmjs.com/package/file-system-utils

0

I had been happy copy/pasting @grabantot 's solution until I met the 100 file limit issue.

@xlm 's solution overcomes the 100-file-limit, and it returns an array of FileEntry objects.

However in my project I need to extract the file paths from fileEntry objects.

This works if you have access to the ChromeFileSystem api:


const getAllPaths = async (dataTransferItems) =>{

    async function getAllFileEntries(dataTransferItemList) {
        let fileEntries = [];
        // Use BFS to traverse entire directory/file structure
        let queue = [];
       
        for (let i = 0; i < dataTransferItemList.length; i++) {

          queue.push(dataTransferItemList[i].webkitGetAsEntry());

        }
        while (queue.length > 0) {
          let entry = queue.shift();
          if (entry.isFile) {
            fileEntries.push(entry);
          } else if (entry.isDirectory) {
            queue.push(...await readAllDirectoryEntries(entry.createReader()));
          }
        }
        return fileEntries;
      }
      
      // Get all the entries (files or sub-directories) in a directory 
      // by calling readEntries until it returns empty array
      async function readAllDirectoryEntries(directoryReader) {
        let entries = [];
        let readEntries = await readEntriesPromise(directoryReader);
        while (readEntries.length > 0) {
          entries.push(...readEntries);
          readEntries = await readEntriesPromise(directoryReader);
        }
        return entries;
      }
      
      // Wrap readEntries in a promise to make working with readEntries easier
      // readEntries will return only some of the entries in a directory
      // e.g. Chrome returns at most 100 entries at a time
      async function readEntriesPromise(directoryReader) {
        try {
          return await new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
            directoryReader.readEntries(resolve, reject);
          });
        } catch (err) {
          console.log(err);
        }
      }


     const getDisplayPath = (entry)=>{
        return new Promise((resolve, reject) =>{
            chrome.fileSystem.getDisplayPath(entry, (path)=>{
                if(chrome.runtime.lastError) {
                    reject(chrome.runtime.lastError)
                }else {
                    resolve(path);
                }
            })
        })
    }


    
    const fileEnties = await getAllFileEntries(dataTransferItems);

    const files = await Promise.all(fileEnties.map(async(x)=>{
        return (await getDisplayPath(x))
    }))

    return files;

}

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