9

I'm trying to add an authorization layer to an API, and the current design I have results in more SQL queries than it feels like should be required, so I'm wondering how I can simplify this.

Context

Here's the database schema for this piece of the problem:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS users (
  id          TEXT PRIMARY KEY,
  email       CITEXT NOT NULL UNIQUE,
  password    TEXT NOT NULL,
  name        TEXT NOT NULL,
  created_at  DATE NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
);

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS teams (
  id          TEXT PRIMARY KEY,
  email       CITEXT NOT NULL,
  name        TEXT NOT NULL,
  created_at  DATE NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
);

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS memberships (
  id          TEXT PRIMARY KEY,
  "user"      TEXT NOT NULL REFERENCES users(id) ON UPDATE CASCADE ON DELETE CASCADE,
  team        TEXT NOT NULL REFERENCES teams(id) ON UPDATE CASCADE ON DELETE CASCADE,
  role        TEXT NOT NULL,
  created_at  DATE NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
  UNIQUE("user", team)
);

And the API endpoint in question is GET /users/:user/teams, which returns all of the teams a user is a member of. Here's what the controller for that route looks like:

(Note: all of this is Javascript, but it's been sort of pseudocode'd for clarity.)

async getTeams(currentId, userId) {
  await exists(userId)
  await canFindTeams(currentUser, userId)
  let teams = await findTeams(userId)
  let maskedTeams = await maskTeams(currentUser, teams)
  return maskedTeams
}

Those four asynchronous functions are the core logical steps that need to happen for the authorization to be "complete". Here's what each of those functions roughly looks like:

async exists(userId) {
  let user = await query(`
    SELECT id
    FROM users
    WHERE id = $[userId]
  `)
  if (!user) throw new Error('user_not_found')
  return user
}

exists simply checks whether a user by that userId even exists in the database, and throws the proper error code if not.

query is just pseudocode for running a SQL query with escaped variables.

async canFindTeams(currentUser, userId) {
  if (currentUser.id == userId) return
  let isTeammate = await query(`
    SELECT role
    FROM memberships
    WHERE "user" = $[currentUser.id]
    AND team IN (
      SELECT team
      FROM memberships
      WHERE "user" = $[userId]
    )
  `)
  if (!isTeammate) throw new Error('team_find_unauthorized')
}

canFindTeams ensures that either the current user is the one making the request, or that the current user is a teammate of the user in question. Anyone else should not be authorized to find the user in question. In my real implementation, it's actually done with roles that have associated actions, so that a teammate can teams.read but can't teams.admin unless they are an own. But I simplified that for this example.

async findTeams(userId) {
  return await query(`
    SELECT
      teams.id,
      teams.email,
      teams.name,
      teams.created_at
    FROM teams
    LEFT JOIN memberships ON teams.id = memberships.team
    LEFT JOIN users ON users.id = memberships.user
    WHERE users.id = $[userId]
    ORDER BY
      memberships.created_at DESC,
      teams.id
  `)
}

findTeams will actually query the database for the teams objects.

async maskTeams(currentUser, teams) {
  let memberships = await query(`
    SELECT team
    FROM memberships
    WHERE "user" = $[currentUser.id]
  `)
  let teamIds = memberships.map(membership => membership.team)
  let maskedTeams = teams.filter(team => teamIds.includes(team.id))
  return maskedTeams
}

maskTeams will return only the teams that a given user should see. This is needed because a user should be able to see all of their teams, but teammates should only be able to see their teams in common, so as to not leak information.

Problems

One of the requirements that led me to break it up like this is that I need a way to throw those specific error codes, so that the errors returned to API clients are helpful. For example, the exists function runs before the canFindTeams function so that not everything errors with a 403 Unauthorized.

Another, that's not well communicated here in pseudocode, is that the currentUser can actually be an app (a third-party client), a team (an access token that pertains to the team itself) or a user (the common case). This requirement makes it difficult to implement the canFindTeams or the maskTeams function as single SQL statements, since the logic has to be forked three ways... In my implementation, both functions are actually switch statements around the logic for handling all three cases—that the requester is an app, a team and a user.

But even given those constraints, this feels like a lot of extra code to write to ensure all of these authentication requirements. I'm worried about performance, code maintainability, and also about the fact that these queries aren't all in single transactions.

Questions

  • Do the extra queries meaningfully affect performance?
  • Can they be combined into fewer queries easily?
  • Is there a better design for the authorization that simplifies this?
  • Does not using transactions pose problems?
  • Anything else you'd change?

Thanks!

2
  • have you considered using single plpgsql function which combines all above mentioned logic and returns a single json field which contains all necessary response info? Mar 10, 2016 at 8:58
  • @LongBeard_Boldy I'm unsure of how to make that happen. For example how to return "response info" from the query in a way that makes it usable to the application code, but also doesn't make the query insane to read/edit again later. But I'd definitely consider it! Mar 10, 2016 at 15:57

4 Answers 4

2

I made it a function and simplified the tables just to be easier to test. SQL Fiddle. I'm making assumptions since some of the rules are embedded in the javascript pseudo code which I do not quite understand.

create or replace function visible_teams (
    _user_id int, _current_user_id int
) returns table (
    current_user_role int,
    team_id int,
    team_email text,
    team_name text,
    team_created_at date
) as $$
    select
        m0.role,
        m0.team,
        t.email,
        t.name,
        t.created_at
    from
        memberships m0
        left join
        memberships m1 on m0.team = m1.team and m1.user = _user_id
        inner join
        teams t on t.id = m0.team
    where m0.user = _current_user_id

    union

    select null, null, null, null, null
    where not exists (select 1 from users where id = _user_id)

    order by role nulls first
    ;
$$ language sql;

Returns all current user's teams plus the the user common teams:

select * from visible_teams(3, 1);
 current_user_role | team_id | team_email | team_name | team_created_at 
-------------------+---------+------------+-----------+-----------------
                 1 |       1 | email_1    | team_1    | 2016-03-13
                 1 |       3 | email_3    | team_3    | 2016-03-13
                 2 |       2 | email_2    | team_2    | 2016-03-13
(3 rows)

When the user does not exist it returns the first line containing nulls plus all current user's teams:

select * from visible_teams(5, 1);
 current_user_role | team_id | team_email | team_name | team_created_at 
-------------------+---------+------------+-----------+-----------------
                   |         |            |           | 
                 1 |       1 | email_1    | team_1    | 2016-03-13
                 1 |       3 | email_3    | team_3    | 2016-03-13
                 2 |       2 | email_2    | team_2    | 2016-03-13
(4 rows)

When the current user does not exist then an empty set:

select * from visible_teams(1, 5);
 current_user_role | team_id | team_email | team_name | team_created_at 
-------------------+---------+------------+-----------+-----------------
(0 rows)
1
+200

Your intent/requirement to reflect details about the failure to the user showing different errors is a major reason for not joining the queries into fewer ones.

For answering your explicit questions:

Do the extra queries meaningfully affect performance?

This really depends on the number of rows with the tables. For performance you should go and measure the timings of the queries. This really can't be judged from the queries (alone). Usually queries with "column=VALUE" have a good chance to be performing OK, given the table is small or there is a proper index in place.

Can they be combined into fewer queries easily?

Given the queries you showed, combining would be possible. This will likely loose the distinction of the actual cause of the auth failure (or add extra complexity to the query). However, you already stated the real queries are likely a bit more complex. Combining several tables and (supposedley) lots of alternatives (ORs, UNIONs needed to cover the variants) might cause the query optimizer to no longer find a good plan. So, as you are concerned with performance, combining the queries might have a negative effect on overall performance (subject to measurement as usual). The overall performance also couls sufffer as you then have less queries running in parallel. (Which only is a benefit as long as the number of parallel requests really is low).

Is there a better design for the authorization that simplifies this?

This can't be answered based on the few criteria presented that led to this design. We would need input about what needs to be achieved and what the musts and shouds of the security strategy are. In some case e.g. you might get by with using row level security available from PG asof version 9.5.

Does not using transactions pose problems?

Yes, not having transactions could lead to inconsistent decision results as soon as there are changes to your authorisation tables while queries are being executed. E.g. consider a user is being removed and the canFindTeam is completed before the exists query, or similar race conditions.

Those effects need not necesarily be harmful, but they definitely exist. PFor getting a clearer picture on this, please consider the possible modifications (Insert, delete, update) on the auth tables and the effect on your auth queries (and do not assume the queries are executed in order - you are running the async!) and the final decision and return to the user. If all of these results are not exhiiting a risk then you may stick with not using transactions. Otherwise using transactions is strongly recommended.

Anything else you'd change?

From a security perspective giving details about a failure is a bad thing to do. So you should really always return a "not authorized" on failure or just return an empty result (and only log the detailed reasult of the checks for analysis or debug).

1

I might (and probably am) over simplifying this, but lets start with simplified clarification. You want information for a specific user, and whatever teams they MAY be affiliated with. By starting with a given user, you will ALWAYS get at least the user components if it is a valid user in question. Only IF there is a membership record and a corresponding team will you get all the team information that this one person is directly associated with. If this query returns NO records, then the user ID is invalid to begin with, and you can respond accordingly with 0 records.

SELECT
      u.id as userid,
      u.email,
      u.password,
      u.name,
      u.created_at,
      m.id as memberid,
      m.team as teamid,
      m.role,
      m.created_at as membercreated,
      t.email as teamEmail,
      t.name as teamName,
      t.created_at as teamCreated
   from
      users u
         LEFT JOIN memberships m
            ON u.id = m.user
            LEFT JOIN teams t
               ON m.team = t.id
   where
      u.id = UserIDYouAreInterestedIn

So this is going from the user to the membership to the teams that one person IS directly associated with and has no bearing on another person. I was not seeing where this "other person" reference was coming from which restricts showing details only for the common teams. So, until further clarification, I will expand this answer and take it another level down to get all memberships of another user and they share the same team... Basically by reversing the nesting of tables on common membership / team back to the user table.

SELECT
      u.id as userid,
      u.email,
      u.password,
      u.name,
      u.created_at,
      m.id as memberid,
      m.team as teamid,
      m.role,
      m.created_at as membercreated,
      t.email as teamEmail,
      t.name as teamName,
      t.created_at as teamCreated,
      u2.name as OtherTeamMate,
      u2.email as TeamMateEMail
   from
      users u
         LEFT JOIN memberships m
            ON u.id = m.user
            LEFT JOIN teams t
               ON m.team = t.id
            LEFT JOIN memberships m2
               on m.team = m2.team
              AND m2.user = IDOfSomeOtherUser
              LEFT JOIN users u2
                 on m2.user = u2.id
   where
      u.id = UserIDYouAreInterestedIn

I hope this makes sense, and let me clarify the re-join to memberships as m2. If person "A" has a membership to teams "X", "Y" and "Z", then I want to join the memberships table by the SAME TEAM -- AND Some Other Person ID. IF one such entry DOES exist, go to the user's table again (alias u2) and grab the teammate's name and email.

If there are 50 teams available, but person "A" is only applicable to 3 teams, then it is only looking for other POSSIBLE members of those 3 teams AND the user on the secondary (m2 alias) membership table is that "other" person's ID.

0

I wanted to summarize a few things after having thought about the problem some more and implemented a solution... @rpy's answer helped a lot, read that first!

There are a few things that are inherent to the authorization code and the database querying code that allow for a better, more future-proof design that lets you get rid of two of those queries.

404's not 403's

The first problem, which @rpy alluded to, is that for security purposes, you don't want to show users who aren't authorized to find an object a 403 response, since it leaks information. Instead, all errors like 403: user_find_unauthorized that are thrown from the code should be remapped (however you want to make that happen) to 404: user_not_found.

With that in place, it's also pretty easy to change the authorization code to not fail when a user object doesn't exist in the first place. (Actually, in my case my authorization code was already structured this way).

That lets you get rid of the exists check—one query down.

Think About Pagination

The second problem is a future problem: what will happen when you decide to add pagination to your API later? With my example code, pagination would be very hard to implement since "querying" and "masking" were separate, such that doing things like LIMIT 10 becomes near impossible to do correctly.

For this reason, although the masking code might get complex, you have to include it in your original find query, to allow for pagination LIMIT and ORDER BY clauses.

One more query down.

2 is Better than 1

After all of that, I don't think I'd want to combine the last two queries into a single query, because the separation of concerns between them is very useful. Not only that, but if someone isn't authorized to access an object, the current setup will fail fast without the chance that it negatively impacts database load by having to do unnecessary work.

With all of that you'd end up with something along the lines of:

async getTeams(currentId, userId) {
  await can(['users.find', 'teams.find'], currentUser, userId)
  let teams = await findTeams(currentUser, userId)
  return teams
}

can will perform the authorization, and by providing users.find in addition to teams.find it will ensure that unauthorized looks return 404s.

findTeams will perform the lookups, and by passing it currentUser it can also incorporate the necessary masking logic.

Hope that all helps anyone else who's wondering about this!

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