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Recently, I am installing the PC^2 on my Ubuntu14.04LTS to make up our university's ACM-ICPC Contest environment. But when I run the shell file "pc2server", the system gives me an error alert which is

pc2server: 27: pc2server: Syntax error: "&" unexpected

So I check the file pc2server and find the line 27. I found that the code is

java -d64 -version |& grep -q "Error" && JAVA32=1

I know what syntax | and & means, but what I only just want to know is that what syntax |& means.

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  • What has become of the good tradition of reading the fine manual?
    – Jens
    Mar 11, 2016 at 13:50

3 Answers 3

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From the bash man page:

Pipelines

A pipeline is a sequence of one or more commands separated by one of the control operators | or |&. The format for a pipeline is:

[time [-p]] [ ! ] command [ [|│|&] command2 ... ]

The standard output of command is connected via a pipe to the standard input of command2. This connection is performed before any redirections specified by the command (see REDIRECTION below). If |& is used, the standard error of command is connected to command2’s standard input through the pipe; it is shorthand for 2>&1 |. This implicit redirection of the standard error is performed after any redirections specified by the command.

Check your hash-bang line. Plain sh doesn't support |&.

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  • Thanks a lot, but now I find that if I delete the & or replace the |& to the 2>&1 |, the shell code will be right. Why? Mar 11, 2016 at 5:31
  • What shell does the script use? It must be one that doesn't support |&. Mar 11, 2016 at 12:01
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    It is the Bourne shell. The PC^2 system pc2.ecs.csus.edu is developed by California State University and I think maybe they would not make mistakes. Mar 11, 2016 at 13:26
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    What is the hash-bang line: #!/bin/sh? #!/bin/bash? Other? Plain sh doesn't support |&. Mar 11, 2016 at 13:38
  • The hash-bang line is #!/bin/sh. (sh is the Bourne shell,bash is the Bourne again shell). I think I got it, thanks a lot! Mar 11, 2016 at 13:41
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Please check answer of John. Here I am adding example for detail understating.

# cat /tmp/test1
cat: /tmp/test1: No such file or directory
# cat /tmp/test1 2> /dev/null | grep "No such file or directory"
# cat /tmp/test1 2> /dev/null |& grep "No such file or directory"
cat: /tmp/test1: No such file or directory

First command returns error as file does not exist (stderr output from command).

Second command do not return any output as stderr of cat command is redirect /dev/null, so grep command do not get stderr of cat command through pipe.

Third command returns output even stderr of cat command is redirected to /dev/null because of pipe with ampersand (|&). It connects stdout and stderr of command1 to command2’s stdin; The implicit redirection of the standard error is performed after any redirections specified by the command.

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I would like to commend the third example given by Nils:

#cat /tmp/test1 2> /dev/null |& grep "No such file or directory"
cat: /tmp/test1: No such file or directory

|& is shorthand for 2>&1 | as John Kugelman mentioned above, so stderr (the descriptor 2) of the command cat /tmp/test1 is redirected to the pipe |, not the /dev/null no longer, thus grep can receive the output of stderr but /dev/null cannot.

Another example explaining that:

bash-4.2$ cat /tmp/test1 2> a.txt 2> b.txt
bash-4.2$ cat a.txt 
bash-4.2$ cat b.txt
cat: /tmp/test1: No such file or directory

The output is because the second redirection statement 2> a.txt overrides the first statement 2> a.txt.

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