0

This question already has an answer here:

According to this topic:

Can I use the ampersand in SASS to reference specific tags with the parent class?

following code

[try 1]

.specific-style {
  color: red;
  b& {
    color: green;
  }
  span& {
    color: blue;
  }
}

should return

.specific-style {
  color: red;
}
b.specific-style {
  color: green;
}
span.specific-style {
  color: blue;
}

but it gives

"&" may only be used at the beginning of a compound selector.

[try 2]

.specific-style {
  color: red;
  b#{&} {
    color: green;
  }
  span#{&} {
    color: blue;
  }
}

returns

.specific-style {
  color: red;
}
.specific-style b.specific-style {
  color: green;
}
.specific-style span.specific-style {
  color: blue;
}

[try 3]

.parent {
  .specific-style {
    color: red;

    @at-root b#{&}{
      color: green;
    }
    @at-root span#{&} {
      color: blue;
    }
  }
}

returns

.parent .specific-style {
  color: red;
}
b.parent .specific-style {
  color: green;
}
span.parent .specific-style {
  color: blue;
}

This one is closest so far, but i forgot to mention this should work for nested selectors too, as follows:

.parent .specific-style {
  color: red;
}
.parent b.specific-style {
  color: green;
}
.parent span.specific-style {
  color: blue;
}

Is there a mistake in my code or is it a Sass compiler bug?

marked as duplicate by Paulie_D, cimmanon css Mar 10 '16 at 16:46

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • I think you've read it wrong. I am not a Sass user but @at-root b#{&} seems to be what you need based on cimmanon's answer here in the original-original. – Harry Mar 10 '16 at 16:07
  • @Harry, Paulie_D Thanks for the comments, I have updated my question with suggested solutions, but still didn't achieve what I need, I forgot to mention this should work for nested selectors too. – Dariusz Sikorski Mar 10 '16 at 16:22
2

After some experimentation, you just repeat the process mentioned in the original answer

  .specific-style {
    color: red;

    @at-root b#{&}{

         @at-root .parent #{&}{
          color: green;
        }
    }


    @at-root span#{&} {
         @at-root .parent #{&}{
          color: blue;
        }

    }
  }

spits out

.specific-style {
  color: red;
}
.parent b.specific-style {
  color: green;
}
.parent span.specific-style {
  color: blue;
}

Sassmeister Demo

But that seems a complex way of doing things.

  • Haha, yeah repeating the parent selector Inside of the child seems to solve it, but it works only if i know what is the parent selector and paste it two times. I couldn't create an universal mixin by using this solution, but for this exact case, this would solve it, so here is the point. – Dariusz Sikorski Mar 10 '16 at 16:45
1

I wanted to avoid using "placeholder-selector", but that is a way i solved this:

%colors {
  color: red;
}
b%colors {
  color: green;
}
span%colors {
  color: blue;
}

@mixin colors{
  @extend %colors;
};

.parent {
  .specific-style {
    @include colors;
  }
}

returns

.parent .specific-style {
  color: red;
}

.parent b.specific-style {
  color: green;
}

.parent span.specific-style {
  color: blue;
}

\o/

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